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What Did I Do Wrong?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Sometimes when I cook something I end up barely tasting the ingredients I added. Here's an example, beer braised bratwurst last night. I fried up some onions (2) until they got brown, in olive oil, then I chopped one head of garlic and added it in. The I deglazed with two bottles of beer, I then poked some holes in the bratwurst and let it gently simmer in there for 40 min. Then I grilled them, in the end they just tasted like the bratwurst, no beer or onion flavor. What should I try differently next time? thanks. 

post #2 of 10

The flavors of the brat are much stronger than beer and onions in general. The beer and onions are supporting notes if that and you'll often be hard pressed to taste them especially if grilling after.  The skin of a sausage is fairly impermeable and the fork holes really arent' up to the task of sharing flavors. They are mostly to prevent the brat from bursting from internal pressure.  Although if you used a whole head of garlic rather than a clove or two, that I think you should have tasted that.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 10

Put the onions on top of the sausage and drink more beer?

post #4 of 10

I agree with Phatch, but in fact, this is not braising but poaching; the amount of liquid is way too much imo.

 

It's just a suggestion;

- first shortly fry the sausage in oil+butter on medium low fire, just to give them a little color

- take the sausages out and add the chopped onion and a few sage leaves. Let sweat.

- put the sausage back in and add dark beer until maximum 1/4th of the height of the sausages is in the liquid

- cover loosely with alu foil and simmer on low fire for approx. 40 minutes. Check on the liquid so it doesn't cook dry; add a little beer if necessary

No need to grill them afterwards; most of the liquid should have disappeared by now and the sausages nicely browned but still juicy.

Take the alu off and let them fry a while longer, turning the sausages a few times to color on all sides. Almost all liquid should be gone by now.

post #5 of 10

Not that braised brats wouldn't be wonderful -- but it's a different thing. Poaching bratwurst in a beer and onion bath before or after grilling is an upper Midwest tradition -- especially when tailgating or for big family gettogethers.    

 

  • You can grill first to get some char on the skin, and finish cooking the seasoned beer bath, which is my preference; or poach first and then grill as you tried.  The first method will give you more beer, the second more grill.  Either way, it is the same price.

 

  • Don't brown the onions first.  Just cut em into chunks and throw them in the beer before warming it to poaching temp.  If you want to get fancy, cut the onions into thick slices and grill them briefly to get some char into the poaching liquid.  And for heaven's sake don't be shy... lots of onions. 

 

  • If you want more beer taste, try a stronger tasting beer, even a porter or stout.  A touch of brown sugar or molasses will bring out the beer taste. 

 

  • Phatch is right that a few pin-pricks aren't going to let a lot of beer in, so poke the heck out of the wurst.  As Poe observed, Pierce boldly pierce... if you seek for El Beerado.

 

  • You can run the beer bath in a smoker or a covered grill set up to smoke.  Oh baby, oh baby.  Give it some thought. 

 

The subject probably doesn't need clarifying, but poaching is not boiling.  The poaching liquid should barely simmer at the "done" temperature for sausage.  160F - 170F is right.   

 

After you get beer poached brats down, the next step is the LA Street Dog aka Danger Dog.  That, you will taste. 
Guaranteed.

 

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 6/14/13 at 10:52am
post #6 of 10
Thread Starter 

You guys are great thanks. What's a street dog? do tell me more.....

post #7 of 10

An LA Street Dog aka Devil Dog aka Ghetto Dog aka Heart Attack Dog aka Tijuana Dog is an extra-long hot dog -- preferably spicy -- wrapped in bacon; dressed with mayo, mustard, and ketchup, smothered with fried jalapenos, grilled onions, and green onions; sometimes covered with the addition of a robust salsa cruda; sometimes with one of the preferred Los Angeles hot sauces (Tapatio, Huichol, Yucateco and a few others); and -- of course -- served on a bun. 

 

Bought on the street, the dog is cooked on a griddle.  Illegal vendors (the best kind) with propane fed home-made small-stand fold 'em up and get the hell out of Dodge fold-up griddles are ubiquitous in some neighborhoods.  

 

Bought from a stand -- and we're finally getting some good stands other than Pinks, Cupids and Tommy's -- the dog might be griddled, grilled or rippered.

 

My favorite stand version comes from an outfit called "Slaw Dogs," where you may have your LA street dog made with a ghost pepper sausage, and dressed with serranos and sri-racha for a little extra zip.  If you like that sort of thing.   

 

A little sloppy?  Yes.  A bit excessive?  Perhaps.  Lacking in flavor?  Not much. 

 

BDL

post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze View Post

A little sloppy?  Yes.  A bit excessive?  Perhaps.  Lacking in flavor?  Not much. 

You forgot to specify that those hot dogs get better as the evening (a.k.a. drinking) progresses. 9pm hot dogs are ok, 11pm hot dogs are good, 1am hot dogs are to die for, and 3am hot dogs are the best you've ever had. 

 

Pink's doesn't impress me. I never understood the people lining up around the corner for those. They're just hot dogs. Nothing special other than the choice on the menu... but once you've made your choice, all you're getting is... a hot dog. The illegal street vendors do a better job IMO. Then again I only go to the street vendors around... typically 3am. drinkbeer.gif

 

 

 

post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze View Post

An LA Street Dog aka Devil Dog aka Ghetto Dog aka Heart Attack Dog aka Tijuana Dog is an extra-long hot dog -- preferably spicy -- wrapped in bacon; dressed with mayo, mustard, and ketchup, smothered with fried jalapenos, grilled onions, and green onions; sometimes covered with the addition of a robust salsa cruda; sometimes with one of the preferred Los Angeles hot sauces (Tapatio, Huichol, Yucateco and a few others); and -- of course -- served on a bun. 




@bdl

sounds like a 'californicated'' version of Tuscon's famous Sonoran hot dog......it's a bit early here, and unlike FF i am starting my day not ending it, but I could really go for one of those 'gut busters' right now......love em' smile.gif

joey

Edited by durangojo - 6/15/13 at 6:34am

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #10 of 10
To really bring out the beer taste when eating sausage, I like to drink it on the side.
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