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Is this what Italians call sedano and Greeks call selino?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

I was just wondering if this is it. I regularly buy this at local farmer's market. Well, it's different from the stuff you can get in supermarkets. The sticks (stems) are much thinner, it's also grown for its leaves and it's much more aromatic. These are the qualities sedano/selino should have so is this it?

 

 

 

 

 

The banana is there so that you can infer how big the celery is. Also, as it's been sitting in the fridge for some 10 days, it's no longer in its best shape and you can see it on some of its leaves. So what do you think?

post #2 of 11

Looks like it.  In Greek cooking they do not use celery stems as we do here, they only use the leaves as an herb.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

Looks like it.  In Greek cooking they do not use celery stems as we do here, they only use the leaves as an herb.


Really? That strikes me as surprising. So what do they do with the stems? To my mind, it's wasteful to throw them away as they make terrific stew base. Do they have some other use for them? Or do Greek varieties come with even smaller and thinner stems (sort of like parsley)?

 

And of course, the leaves are great as a herb. In summer, when freshly shelled beans are in season, I like to bake them with those leaves roughly chopped, some onion and garlic, some cured pork meat, olive oil and perhaps a bit of smoked paprika. Celery compliments the chestnutty flavour of baked beans really nicely.

post #4 of 11

In italy "sedano" just means celery and is used as flavoring or to eat raw or cooked, but generally in salads, soups and sauces.  It depends on the variety and in particular how it was grown, in hothouses, outdoors, etc.  The tastiest one for seasoning is thinner and greener, and is like the one you pictured, but they also sell the more thick, large and juicy ones.

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #5 of 11
The celery we grow in Greece has virtually no stems. It looks like flat leaf parsley only a milder green color and the leaves are a little bigger than parsley. I've never seen celery like what we have there. Greeks waste nothing:)

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

The celery we grow in Greece has virtually no stems. It looks like flat leaf parsley only a milder green color and the leaves are a little bigger than parsley. I've never seen celery like what we have there. Greeks waste nothing:)


I guess I can get that here, too. Thanks to both of you for your replies.

post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slayertplsko View Post

I was just wondering if this is it. I regularly buy this at local farmer's market. Well, it's different from the stuff you can get in supermarkets. The sticks (stems) are much thinner, it's also grown for its leaves and it's much more aromatic.

 

Maybe you and also Koukou refer to lovage which has a thin stem when young. I have a plant in my garden, it's now flowering. It dies in wintertime but comes back each year more abundantly. Only the young leaves are used and only just a few because  the taste is much stronger than regular celery, especially the older and larger leaves. The leaves are impossible to dry as they lose all taste, but they can be frozen and keep all their taste! I use it many times in soups and in many other dishes like a few leaves (2-3) in steamed mussels.

 

In french it's called livèche but its more popular name is céleri perpétuel which means eternal celeri.

More interesting is the name in dutch; maggikruid which means Maggi herb, referring to the taste of the wellknown bottled Maggi seasoning! The more official name in dutch is lavas.

post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 

Interesting point, Chris. However, what I have posted is without a doubt celery. There are different varieties of it and some look like this. People at the farmer's market in my town also sell just celery leaves or only the root (in autumn) or the whole plant like I've posted. The aroma is much stronger than that of the thicker-stemmed and lighter-green celery sticks that are usually sold in supermarkets, but it still is celery aroma (just more intense). I'm familiar with lovage as many people sell that too, but lovage has a different fragrance, albeit quite similar. Lovage is terrific in vegetable soups. But it could be that the Greek selino is, in fact, lovage. Wikipedia doesn't have an entry on lovage in Greek, but I'm thinking it could be like the case of petroselinon, which in its Latin form is the scientific name for parsley and translates from Greek as rock parsley, so perhaps lovage is some ''kind of parsley''? I don't know, Koukou will know. But my guess is that they, too, just use a different variety of celery.

post #9 of 11
Hi Chris,


Totally off topic but I am a big time lovage lover. It means spring to me the way some people freak,over ramps or fiddleheads. If you have tall plants save some of the tall, thick, and hollow stems. Use as straws in bloody marys or ceasars. Thank me latter!

Al
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by AllanMcPherson View Post

... If you have tall plants save some of the tall, thick, and hollow stems. Use as straws in bloody marys or ceasars. Thank me latter!

Al

Well have I ever! Never though about that. Thanks Al!

post #11 of 11

I grew up eating just celery leaves and my grandma scoffed at the fact of eating the stocks. She always called celery a herb. Of course I use celery stalks for all of my soups, but I am glad that after all of those years of me throwing away the leaves, I have finally come back to them. 50/50 coriander and celery leave mix? OOOF. Perfect.

Gourmandise is an impassioned, rational and habitual preference for all objects that flatter the sense of taste.
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Gourmandise is an impassioned, rational and habitual preference for all objects that flatter the sense of taste.
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