or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Can someone please explain the difference of the terms "soup, stew and broth"?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Can someone please explain the difference of the terms "soup, stew and broth"?

post #1 of 3
Thread Starter 

Hello!
Sorry, but it is very difficult to find on Google the difference on these terms.
Can anyone help me?

 

Soup, stew and broth.

 

 

Thank you for your attention!
See you.


 

post #2 of 3

Soup is a finished dish, usually containg stock/broth. But in the case of a chowder, for example, I wouldn't use the term stock at all

 

Broth and stock are not rigourously defined or used in English. They're often used interchangably.  I tend to use the term stock for an unseasoned basic liquid from simmering the bones and aromatics. Broth for when that liquid is ready for use (because of seasoning/reduction) or in use in the soup.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
post #3 of 3

Soup - as defined above.

 

Stew - thick meat-based soup.

 

Broth - thin, clear soup/sauce base made from meat.

 

Stock - thin, clear soup/sauce base made from bones.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Can someone please explain the difference of the terms "soup, stew and broth"?