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Cobia fillet... What to do?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
I have a 6" Cobia fillet, about an 1 1/2" thick. What are your thoughts on best way to prepare? Fresh caught on a trip, frozen and thawed. Ready to prepare tonight.
post #2 of 14

Sorry you didn't get a reply. I'm not sure why someone didn't chime in here earlier. I have never caught (YET!) or eaten cobia so I didn't want to reply but since no one else has: Depending on preference you can trim out some of the blood line. The cooking methods are virtually unlimited..

 

My personal favorite way to prepare fish is to do what I will refer to as "speed basting" since BDL helped me define it.

You can read my post on it but in short.. you add sufficient oil to your pan to allow basting. Once the oil is hot add aromatics (thyme, rosemary, garlic, etc.) Season your fish with a little salt and pepper then place it in the pan. Carefully tilt the pan and using a larger spoon scoop up the aromatic infused oil and baste the fish with the oil. Do this repeatedly. You can flip the filet if you wish but keep basting until it's cooked to your desired temp.

 

Freaking delicious.

post #3 of 14

I saw Morimoto baste a huge slab of salmon that way on Iron Chef, been thinking of trying it ever since.

 

RealSoonNow.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #4 of 14

Cobia is a real great fish and yes you can do that way or even poached in clarified butter.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #5 of 14

Cobia is a very firm flesh. In the South I would see it fried and grilled often. I like both Cobia and Mahi grilled with Jerk Seasoning.

 

Dave

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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post #6 of 14
I get it when ever I see it. It firm and a bit oily. Don't over cook it. A few recent Cobia dish I've made. I usually just pan sear


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You can't lay on the beach and drink rum all day unless you start in the morning

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You can't lay on the beach and drink rum all day unless you start in the morning

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post #7 of 14

I fish a "Mermaid" (all female) off shore tournament every summer .

Gotta bag 3 species...Dolphinfish (Mahi), Kingfish (Mackerel) and a Ling (Cobia).

Prize awarded for heaviest fish of each species as well as total team weight (the heaviest (1) of each type added together)

I was always told that the King and the Ling were "trash" fish and so we either freeze them for chum or use for crab trap bait.

Am I missing out on some good eats?

 

mimi

post #8 of 14
Yes both Kingfish and Cobia and excellent table fair. But let's keep that a secret

You can't lay on the beach and drink rum all day unless you start in the morning

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You can't lay on the beach and drink rum all day unless you start in the morning

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post #9 of 14
Faint whisper.... Anything special re cleaning , portioning and cooking method?

mimi
post #10 of 14

It is done in under 3 minutes by this pro, tips included.

 

@ Scuba: Your dishes are always so inviting.

 

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post

Faint whisper.... Anything special re cleaning , portioning and cooking method?

mimi

 

No harder to clean than any other fish. Even kings are good eating but oily. We used to steak Kings and broil them.

 

Dave

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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post #12 of 14

I've seen a lot of people smoke kings, given that they are oily. The leftovers then go into smoked kingfish dip! I have never heard of cobia as being a trash fish, it's always been sought after by the fisherman I knew that targeted mahi as they both can be found around surface cover/weedlines.

post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by petalsandcoco View Post

It is done in under 3 minutes by this pro, tips included.

 

@ Scuba: Your dishes are always so inviting.

 


Thanks for the kind words Petals. You are too kind

You can't lay on the beach and drink rum all day unless you start in the morning

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You can't lay on the beach and drink rum all day unless you start in the morning

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post #14 of 14

Yes...the shadow under a shrimp boat (resting during the heat of the day) also makes a great fishing spot, lol!

 

mimi

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