or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Breading for Southern Style frying
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Breading for Southern Style frying

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

I am currently trying to find a better recipe for southern fried porkchops and fried chicken. Every recipe I have tried or made is just missing a little something. I'd like a little help from some of the chefs here.

Here is what I currently use and it is just "okay":

1 cup buttermilk
1/2 cup fine cornmeal
1/2 cup AP flour
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1 teaspoon black pepper
1/2 teaspoon cayenne
1 teaspoon onion powder

Would anyone care to share their recipes or ideas?

Thanks!

Gourmandise is an impassioned, rational and habitual preference for all objects that flatter the sense of taste.
Reply
Gourmandise is an impassioned, rational and habitual preference for all objects that flatter the sense of taste.
Reply
post #2 of 12

Are you using the buttermilk to make this into a batter or just for dredging?  As part of a dredge you're missing the egg component although I usually skip it too.  It doesn't sound like anything is missing from this although I like to add SALT and a bit of dried herb like oregano myself.  Maybe the onion powder isn't working?

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #3 of 12

I've seen a lot of people use "seasoned salt" in place of the individual seasonings. Otherwise you could try using some dried herbs such as an thyme, oregano, etc. Also paprika, a little turmeric. It really ends up being a preference. I really like the McCormick "Montreal Chicken" as a quick and easy multipurpose seasoning .. the ingredients are listed as:

 

"GARLIC, SALT, ONION, SPICES (INCLUDING BLACK PEPPER, PARSLEY, AND RED PEPPER), ORANGE PEEL, PAPRIKA, GREEN BELL PEPPERS"

post #4 of 12

For an ultimate flavor explosion in your mouth, soak the chicken pieces to be in buttermilk overnight.  The b'milk gives the meat great moistness even after battering it the next day.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #5 of 12

I agree whole-heartedly with Kokopuffs about the overnight soak in buttermilk.  It really helps.  The only thing that I would add is that to the buttermilk I add crushed garlic cloves, a dose of hot sauce (not enough to make it spicy just enough to help boost the flavors) and usually some fresh herb, usually fresh sage or fresh rosemary depending on my mood.

post #6 of 12

I usually do an egg wash.  If it is just for me, quite a bit of hot sauce goes into the egg.  A lot of the heat gets absorbed by the frying oil, so it takes a bit to get the taste into the finished chicken.  And it gives a different taste than just putting splashes of hot sauce on the finished chicken.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
post #7 of 12

I marinate in B milk overnight.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #8 of 12

You have waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay too much cornmeal in your mix.  You might as well be frying your chicken and pork in crushed cornflakes (which is okay, btw).  Maybe 1 cup flour to 2tbs corn meal.  And use a fairly soft flour.  I keep a mix of AP/Cake flour on hand for frying and biscuits. 

 

Lots -- probably most -- southern cooks, "single dip," as opposed to a double dip like flour/egg/flour.

 

Season EVERYTHING.  Chicken, liquid, flour, EVERYTHING.  That builds "layers."  I think that hot sauce on the chicken and in the dipping liquid is better than cayenne in the flour -- but your choice.

 

I use a buttermilk marinade of one sort or another for chicken, and sometimes a buttermilk brine.  Buttermilk does 75% of its magic in about two hours, and 90% in four.  Overnight is nice, but not necessary. 

 

Buttermilk helps chicken in ways pork doesn't need.  Pork, I just brine.   

 

If the chicken's coming straight from the buttermilk, then it's right into the flour still dripping. 

 

I dry the brine from the pork, then a seasoned egg-milk mix before the seasoned flour.  If I were doing the pork in bread crumbs instead of flour, I'd go flour/egg/crumb -- which is what I'm more likely to do unless smothering the pork chops.

 

Let the coating set up for at least fifteen minutes on a rack before frying to help it stick to the meat. 

 

Hope this helps,

BDL

post #9 of 12

That helped me BDL and I wasn't even asking! I need to try some chicken tenderloins with the buttermilk soak, I've never done that before.

post #10 of 12

Yes, definitely buttermilk, but after that I shake off the excess buttermilk, then shake the chicken in a mixture of flour, seasoning salt, msg, black pepper and a little baking powder.  Then shake off the excess flour mix, redip the chicken again in buttermilk, shake off excess, then reflour it again.  Deep fry in clean oil at 350 until golden brown and finish it in a 350 oven until center is 170 degrees and juices run clear.

post #11 of 12

Buttermilk and Louisiana hot sauce overnight, then into seasoned flour, then rest, then into your hot fat.  And for God's sake make sure your chicken is room temp before frying.

post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze View Post

You have waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay too much cornmeal in your mix.  You might as well be frying your chicken and pork in crushed cornflakes (which is okay, btw).  Maybe 1 cup flour to 2tbs corn meal.  And use a fairly soft flour.  I keep a mix of AP/Cake flour on hand for frying and biscuits. 

 

Lots -- probably most -- southern cooks, "single dip," as opposed to a double dip like flour/egg/flour.

 

Season EVERYTHING.  Chicken, liquid, flour, EVERYTHING.  That builds "layers."  I think that hot sauce on the chicken and in the dipping liquid is better than cayenne in the flour -- but your choice.

 

I use a buttermilk marinade of one sort or another for chicken, and sometimes a buttermilk brine.  Buttermilk does 75% of its magic in about two hours, and 90% in four.  Overnight is nice, but not necessary. 

 

Buttermilk helps chicken in ways pork doesn't need.  Pork, I just brine.   

 

If the chicken's coming straight from the buttermilk, then it's right into the flour still dripping. 

 

I dry the brine from the pork, then a seasoned egg-milk mix before the seasoned flour.  If I were doing the pork in bread crumbs instead of flour, I'd go flour/egg/crumb -- which is what I'm more likely to do unless smothering the pork chops.

 

Let the coating set up for at least fifteen minutes on a rack before frying to help it stick to the meat. 

 

Hope this helps,

BDL


WOW. This helped out a lot. Thanks everyone for your responses. I am going to give this one a try tonight!

Gourmandise is an impassioned, rational and habitual preference for all objects that flatter the sense of taste.
Reply
Gourmandise is an impassioned, rational and habitual preference for all objects that flatter the sense of taste.
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Breading for Southern Style frying