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Help with Gnocchi - gluten free and artichoke puree

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

So am hoping someone might be able to help me with my gluten free gnocchi (gluten intolerance here).

 

Its been Italian week at school all week and tomorrow is our menu development day - have tried making gluten free gnocchi two different ways but neither have results comparable to using AP.  

 

here is the first one:

 

1 russet potato 

1/3-1/2 beaten egg

salt, white pepper & nutmeg to taste

flour as needed

 

for this i substituted rice flour for the AP.  ended up tasting good but wasnt able to roll the gnocchi very well (tried adding more egg didn't seem to help) and using the gnocchi board was impossible b/c they just crumbled (ended up pressing with a fork instead)

 

simmered these until cooked then put them on a tray to cool.  put some EVOO on them also to hold until we needed them.  (am looking to add these to a cream sauce)

 

next up was spinach & ricotta gnocchi

 

1/2 bunch spinach (wilted, squeezed, chopped fine)

1 egg 

2 T ricotta (excess water squeezed out)

2 T parm

salt, pepper, nutmeg to taste

flour as needed

 

was told these work well with rice flour by one of my instructors who has done it before.  my question for this one is about substituting 

artichoke puree for the spinach.  has anyone ever done this before with good results?  this gnocchi is going to be deep fried.

 

my plan is to poach an artichoke - remove the heart and some of the inner leaves so the rest of the choke can be used as a vessel for plating.  hoping that the puree idea would work with the gnocchi so it tied better to the artichoke instead of having a random choke on a plate filled w/ pasta.

 

thanks so much everyone

will be posting pics of all the amazing pasta dishes i have made this week

~MissyD

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~MissyD

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post #2 of 14

First of all I would try this stuff

 

http://www.cup4cup.com/

 

It was put together by Thomas Kellers team.  Its made from cornstarch, white rice flour, brown rice flour, tapioca starch, milk powder, xanthan gum and potato starch.  I've used it for making extruded pasta.  It works well enough, but nothing is going to give elasticity to pasta or gnocchi like flour.  You can obviously make a mixture of your own since you probably don't have cup4cup readily available.

 

Since you're having issues with the binding of your GF gnocchi I dont think adding a wet puree of artichoke will help your cause.  I would try sticking to something less wet, maybe using dried, powdered mushrooms like porcini?  Nettles would be nice, too.  Let us know what you end up doing!

post #3 of 14

MissyD, I have no experience with gluten free flour in making gnocchi, but I guess many kinds of flour will do when you add it a step at a time to the gnocchi preparation. I usually use a ratio of potato + around 20-30% flour + optional 1 or more egg yolk(s). In your case of using glutenfree flour, using eggyolks may be advised as they are a good... glue. You can play with the amount of flour until you reach a stage where the dough comes together but still remains sticky. The less flour the better! Too much flour makes gnocchi rubbery and tough instead of fluffy, same with overworking the dough; kneed as little as possible! . Dust your board and your hands when rolling them very lighthandedly! You may find it alarming that the dough is quite soft, but that is perfect.

 

You probably know by now that you need to make gnocchi while your potatoes are still quite hot and nicely dried, preferably boiled in the skins or even better, ovenbaked for 1 hour.

 

When the gnocchi are made, put them on a kitchentowel that has been flowered but do boil them asap even when you need them hours later. Don't boil too many at a time! The moment they come to the surface of the boiling water, they are ready. Scoop them out with a slotted spoon and put in icecold water for a minute but no longer. You can now store them easily or process further like frying them or warm in a sauce.

 

On the artichoke puree; I make a gnocchi with butternut pumpkin added. In fact, you could use the same principle I use for your artichokes;

a ratio of potato + around 20% artichoke puree + 20-30% of that entire volume in flour + optional eggyolk(s).

 

Spinach ricotta gnocchi; I wouldn't use ricotta (you gonna lose consistency), parm though sounds ok. Same ratio using spinach that is squeezed out firmly and chopped;

potato + around 20% spinach + 20-30% of that volume in flour + optional eggyolk(s).

 

Good luck!

post #4 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cacioEpepe View Post

First of all I would try this stuff

 

http://www.cup4cup.com/

 

It was put together by Thomas Kellers team.  Its made from cornstarch, white rice flour, brown rice flour, tapioca starch, milk powder, xanthan gum and potato starch.  I've used it for making extruded pasta.  It works well enough, but nothing is going to give elasticity to pasta or gnocchi like flour.  You can obviously make a mixture of your own since you probably don't have cup4cup readily available.

 

 

I actually do use this GF flour blend at home all the time for baking - it's awesome.  I tried using it for laminated pasta the other day but it didn't work out well at all (fell apart when run through a sheeter so i ended up just rolling it myself - couldn't get it thin enough though).

 

Chris - thanks for the info - will try making them with those ratios and omitting the ricotta.  will post an update with pics when i get home from school

~MissyD

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~MissyD

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post #5 of 14

I'm a gnocchi-lover and have a question. I've heard of the spinach-ricotta version being called "gnudi". Is that a regional name? I read it in one of Lidia Bastianich's cookbooks and wondered.

 

As an aside, I'm delighted to see a good discussion of gluten free cooking seamlessly integrated the rest of good cooking. thumb.gif I'd been advocating for a GF/allergy forum, but I think this kind of discussion works even better.

 

Bring it on!

 

Mezz

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post #6 of 14
Thread Starter 

so my gnocchi turned out soooo much better yesterday.  i ended up using the cup-4-cup flour instead of rice flour and was able to roll and form them.  really impressed my chefs with this - i was the only person to do 2 different types of gnocchi.  

 

for the artichoke one i was strongly advised not to use artichoke due to the moisture content.  i did anyways.  wasnt able to roll them out really much at all but still turned out awesome.  so proud of myself especially because i didnt think i could pull it off & thanks so much everyone for helping :)

 

*

 

 

 

 

Mezzalunda - are you gluten intolerant or celiac?  i know a lot of people who are (myself included) and i always try to make my dished gluten free.  there are so many great flour substitutions why not utilize them.  i did my school presentation on food allergies and dietary restrictions (i also have a lot of other food allergies/intolerances) and brought in some gluten free & vegan cupcakes i baked (key lime pie & red velvet with vegan cream cheese frosting).  wanted to try and diminish the stereotype that GF/vegan food is tasteless and disgusting.

~MissyD

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~MissyD

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post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissyD View Post

.....for the artichoke one i was strongly advised not to use artichoke due to the moisture content.  i did anyways. ... 

 

 

Great cooks like Heston Blumenthal and all the others didn't get where they are now by following the book or taking strong advice from others as gospel. They follow their own path. thumb.gif

Also, stunning presentation MissyD.

post #8 of 14

Missy, I don't have any food allergies (although I do have to watch acid and excessive spice due to GERD) but I have a dear friend with celiac disease, so I'm trying to learn more about cooking and baking with her in mind. She's also my travel agent and just launched a part of her business for GF travellers, so she did some marketing at the Gluten-free/Allergy free food show near Chicago recently and asked me to go along as a food "consultant". I learned a LOT and connected with the King Arthur Flour people there, among others. The products are getting better and better. I have some recipes of my own I want to convert to gluten-free, so I'm trying to learn how the ingredients, such as xanthan gum, work together.

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post #9 of 14
Thread Starter 

Mezzaluna - havent heard of any travel agents doing that - good on her!  i went to the GF show earlier this year when it was in Vancouver - had a lot of great vendors.  got to see and test out so many great products i didnt even know were available.  i haven't seen king arthur flour - maybe its only available in the US?  have been planning on checking out a trader joes in WA sometime soon though - just have been far too busy with school to drive down there.

 

i am using http://www.cup4cup.com/ right now and it works really well.  have tried a few different GF flour mixes but this one has the best result for savory dishes (no almond flour like the other brand i was using for baking).  this one has the xanthan gum already in the mix.  had tried something with guar gum in it as well but can't remember which brand it was.  made some pretty good crepes out of chick pea flour last month in class also.

 

havent tried making bread yet with the mix - planning on trying that maybe later today.  GF bread is about $6 per loaf up here and the loafs are super small.  would rather make my own.  hopefully it turns out well

~MissyD

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~MissyD

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post #10 of 14

MissyD, I'm sure you can order King Arthur Flour's GF products from their website if you can't find a local source. You can ask if they have any retailers near you; if they do, they'll tell you where you can find their products.

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post #11 of 14

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/essentials/gluten-free/

the problem with most gluten free "flours" is that the components are mainly starches and the protein content is very low. doesn't structurally hold up as well. can be fixed by adding sorghum, millet, amaranth or teff and even more brown rice flours.

post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by katbalou View Post

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/essentials/gluten-free/

the problem with most gluten free "flours" is that the components are mainly starches and the protein content is very low. doesn't structurally hold up as well. can be fixed by adding sorghum, millet, amaranth or teff and even more brown rice flours.

 

love using amaranth as a binder - worked really good for a lot of different things ive done smile.gif

~MissyD

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~MissyD

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post #13 of 14

I see you got your solution but next time maybe try sweet potato flour from an Asian market.  I'd be curious to know if you try it and the result.

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post #14 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chiffonade View Post

I see you got your solution but next time maybe try sweet potato flour from an Asian market.  I'd be curious to know if you try it and the result.

 

have never seen sweet potato flour before - will have to check for it next time im at the store.  thanks so much

~MissyD

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~MissyD

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