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Keeping gazpacho red?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

So I decided with the heat I would try making gazpacho. I used what I found to be somewhat universal as a basic recipe, tomato juice along with fresh tomatoes (peeled and de-seeded), onion, bell pepper, cucumber, garlic, vinegar, olive oil, and flat leaf parsley. Also some french bread soaked in ice water.

 

My question is how do you avoid it turning kind of an off orange/brown color? I assume the green elements turned the color some. Perhaps my tomatoes weren't as red as they could have been, romas tend to be very red throughout. It tastes fine and I am going to serve it with jumbo lump crab and diced cucumber.

 

So what has your experience been? Google image search basically runs the gamit from deep red to orange to dark brown so I guess I am not alone in this. I ended up adding in paprika to try to give it some color back. I'll post a picture later.


Edited by eastshores - 6/28/13 at 11:12am
post #2 of 14

Flavor not an issue?  Thinking RED bell peppers instead of green might help... my preferrence over green anyway.  Thinking color-wheel... red + green = brown?!?

post #3 of 14

chairlady might be right.  Are you using the gazpacho right away?  Vinegar will break down colors pretty quick if left alone.  Maybe leave the parsley out and toss some chopped with your cucumber, crab salad.  Either way it sounds delicious.

post #4 of 14
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the input.. the pepper suggestion sounds good. I happened to have a green pepper so I used that. It tastes good, in the daylight the color wasn't too bad. Here's a shot I took from my phone.

 

post #5 of 14

Looks pretty darn good in pic!  I like green bells but fnd red/yellow/orange are MUCH sweeter.

post #6 of 14
I'd recommend less or a different onion as well. Too many Onions always turn my tomato sauces orange.
post #7 of 14

I kind of like the orangy color of gazpacho, it looks somewhat more authentic. But nothing should stop you from trying to tweek the color. I wonder what a dash of beetroot juice would do in it?

The comment of thatchairlady is very true concerning combining complementary colors like red and green, that doesn't work at all, it will indeed color brown or gray-ish.

 

Last november I was in Torremolinos, Spain. The hotel made a killer gazpacho every single day next to a hot soup which changed every day. I had gazpacho nearly every day! It always tasted very garlicky and slightly spicy, probably due to the amount of garlic and vinegar in it. Around the dish there were a set of trays with very finely chopped white onion and cucumber. I stole fried breadcrumbs from the hot soup area to go with it...

 

Here's one of my try-outs from last summer. I only use fresh tomatoes;

 

gazpacho 1 gazpacho 2

 

post #8 of 14

Sometimes what turns it more orange in color is blending. You might try using fresh tomatoes, not cooking them at all, and then passing them through a food mill and mixing them with your pureed/cooked vegetables. 

 

If you are using canned tomatoes then I would recommend cooking them, but if you can find really fresh, nice looking tomatoes (tis the season, or soon will be) there probably isnt a need to cook them. This will probably help keep them bright as well. 

post #9 of 14

You want to keep the red color?  Don't make your Gazpacho in the food processor.

Hand dice all your veggies and add them to the liquid.

Time consuming? Yes...

No color issues. Yes again.

post #10 of 14

Biggest color change culprits are parsley and green pepper.  Try whipping in some tomato puree or paste

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #11 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefross View Post

You want to keep the red color?  Don't make your Gazpacho in the food processor.

Hand dice all your veggies and add them to the liquid.

Time consuming? Yes...

No color issues. Yes again.

 

Well the time issue is not a problem because I have hand diced many batches of pico de gallo in the past. In fact, a friend commented that my pico reminded him of gazpacho which I had never heard of at the time so that is what lead me towards making this. I saw most gazpachos were texturally smooth and given it is a cold soup I figured it needed to be done in the blender. I will give that a go (or possibly mortar and pestle) next time. Flavor wise I prefer pico de gallo.. I favor a heavy lime and garlic component but like gazpacho the pico de gallo is SO MUCH better when left to marinate a day or two in the refrigerator!

 

Thanks to everyone for the feedback!

post #12 of 14
We normally do not cook any ingredients in our gazpacho, and try putting it through the smallest hole in a meat grinder instead of a food processor, season it after with olive oil and vinager..
post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 

Ahh! Now that's an idea, I have a grinder attachment for my kitchenaid but have never used it. I forget it can be used basically like a food mill. I also didn't cook any of the ingredients, just scalding the tomatoes to remove their skins. By the way ChrisB.. nice picture and is that a dang cheese chip?!! I finally got one of those silicon mats so I could make one!!

post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by eastshores View Post

.... By the way ChrisB.. nice picture and is that a dang cheese chip?!! I finally got one of those silicon mats so I could make one!!

 

Indeed, it's a parmezan crisp made in a dry non-stick pan. Simply put a serving ring in the pan, add some grated parmezan, remove the ring, put on medium fire and when it bubbles, soon it will get a little color and they're done. They crisp up when cooled.

 

I have to add a little more on gazpacho. This is a high summer cooling drink that should be all about freshness. You really need to taste the cucumber really well, the garlic, the acidity and of course the tomatoes. This means that using methods or ingredients that don't contribute to the fresh experience are out... imo that is. So, no boiling, no tomato paste, no parsley and what not.

I use a stick mixer in a narrow container. Mix all veggies first (cut them roughly before adding to the container), then the bread, then add cold water until you get the right consistency, then the vinegar a little at a time (keep tasting!!) then the olive oil. It's important to add the vinegar before the oil! Store in the fridge for at least 20 minutes before trying.

 

 

 


Edited by ChrisBelgium - 7/2/13 at 4:19am
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