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First aid for kitchen burns.

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
I have been a chef for over 20 years and fortunately I have not burnt myself severely to require first aid. I should really know what to apply to burns but all I know is to run cold water over the burn for several minutes then apply any cream or spray. Or ring emergency services if more serious.

The company I currently work for has hundreds of hotels and restaurants and one day a commis chef splashed hot oil over her hand and the 27 year old kitchen manager saw this and didn't do anything.

She ran her hand under cold water and a fortnight later it was still scarred. On separate occasions I asked the 27 year old kitchen manager, 23 year old head chef and the 21 year old assistant manageress about purchasing something to spray or rub onto kitchen burns and they all individually said the exact same thing and that the best thing is to run your burn under cold running water.

These 3 individuals have been with the company all their brief working lives and have been brainwashed into a particular way of thinking. Surely there is something better than cold water for minor kitchen burns?
post #2 of 7

ummmmm , you know it is actually medical correct to run the burn over cold running water for 5 minutes , to prevent any further or severe damage. 

 

At my place we all do the same thing run over cold water , and then spray an anticeptic to kill off any bacteria that or you can

wash the burn and apply aloe. But thats all you can really do.

 

When your on the job working 115 dishes and you burn yourself  , you will most likely go run some cold water on it , and go back to work before doing anything else.  Its not that we are stupid , we just cant let the crew down. 

 

Now if i burn myself severly , then obviously i will seek medical attention no matter the cost , 

2 weeks ago i dropped boiling water on my foot , i quickly ran to private space in the kitchen while taking off the shoes , took of the socks , ran cold water on it with a hose , sprayed anticeptic and in 6 minutes tops i was back in the stove boiling water again XD. 

 

Trust me if it was something extremely severe like lets say.... hot oil then the first thing i would do is run to the hose , run water over my feet , and tell my chef im clocking out , and that is that (obviously the burn would have to be pretty sever , painful and intolerable ) !! If the chef is smart enough he will demand you to leave the kitchen before you even ask. 

 

Now in you situation the commis splashed oil in her hand , and she did the right thing in running the cold water , now if she obviously felt she could handle the burn and it was something tolerable i guess its her risk , but the manager and or chef should have at least asked if she wanted medical attention...

 

Obviously the situation is relative , because most chefs are stubborn and wont leave the kitchen because of a burn , ( at least i dont , if i think its tolerable ) but it is the responibility of who ever is in charge to at least ask if one desires medical attention , if the answer from the employee is a no , i would probably keep an eye on said employee just to see if they arent attempting to play the hero. Aside from that the answer is....sure you can do other stuff to a burn , but the fastest , easiest ,and most common would be running cold water over it. 

Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

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Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

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post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 
Yes, totally agree .

Is there a product my company can stock in their first aid kits that can help kitchen burns. At there moment there is nothing for this specific injury. Should they provide aloe, ice spray, burn cream? Something is better than nothing, yes?
post #4 of 7

Well , in brazil our brand name creams would be different then yours, but why not just go and check your local pharmacy and ask for some advice on some good cream meant for burns. Tell them you work in a kitchen , explain to them what you would like , im sure someone would help you. 

Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

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Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

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post #5 of 7

cold water the sooner the better, silvadine for severe burns....aloe is amazing

cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #6 of 7
Sounds like the cooks in leadership roles need training, as well as all staff. The soldier-on logic is uniquely a cook ethos. I too, have waited until end of service to address serious wounds. Last major burn was from moving a saute pan off the line that just came out of a 500deg oven. I should have followed the habit of always toweling handles, but there was an escape. A few hours later the ER cut away blisters, applied silverdyne and wrapped it. The biggest risk is trying to keep hand dry - nearly impossible - during healing process. Every kitchen /should/ have a well-equipped aid kit. I have seen maybe two kitchens that actually had one. My knife roll has steri and butterfly, glue, tape, burn cream, etc. . And those items have been shared with plenty of unprepared cooks.
Do or Do not - There is no Try. - Yoda
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Do or Do not - There is no Try. - Yoda
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post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by kirkunit View Post

These 3 individuals have been with the company all their brief working lives and have been brainwashed into a particular way of thinking. Surely there is something better than cold water for minor kitchen burns?

Actually they are all right.

 

First degree burns:

 

1) Hold affected area under COOL  running water for 15-20 minutes.

 

Second degree burns:

 

1) Hold affected area under COOL running water for 15-20 minutes         

2) Cover with sterile non-adhesive bandage (which every kitchen should have in the emergency kit) and if by any chance they don't have one then  grab a piece of clean plastic wrap and cover the affected area.

 

 

 

Don't Apply ice

Don't Break blisters

Don't Remove peeled skin

Don't Remove any fabric stuck to the burn

Don't apply creams, ointments , lotions or even butter

 

( Easier said than done, I know , but this is typical first aid care for burns - I used to treat them in the hospital )

 

3rd Degree Burns ?

 

Get Professional Help.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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