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Is Veritas® Honing Compound a good choice?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

For now I am using unloaded strop. But I deiced to make another one and load it with 0.5 micron compound. I found this compound, Veritas Honing Compound, on Lee Valley tools. Its local to me, and I can get it in the store.

Does anybody knows if it's a good choice, it says: "It is a blend of both chromium and aluminum oxide", so I am not sure if its what am I looking for, as I always read to use pure chromium oxide ones.....

Here is the link:

http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=32984&cat=1,43072

post #2 of 9

Don't know Vertias in particular, but generically, chromium oxide is not particularly good for kitchen knives, especially at the ultra fine grit size.  It's more shine than sharp; leaves a very slippery edge without any bite; and is incredibly messy.  Green everywhere. 

 

A lot of sharpeners have moved on to other compounds, particularly boron, CBN and diamond. 

 

0.5u is extremely fine.  Few kitchen knives will hold that level of polish -- or anything like it -- for very long; and there aren't many (any?) tasks which scream for it.  Why do you want to take a kitchen knife to that level of polish?  I'm not saying there aren't good reasons, just asking.

 

BDL 

post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the input BDL I will see if I can find any mentioned compounds around. The reason is purely experimental. There is no particular physical need for that at this point, just something I would like to play around and get some first person experience.
 

post #4 of 9

I use it and one stick has lasted me about 2 years and about 5K knives. I'm only maybe 1/3 through with it.

 

As BDL said it is a messy product but will leave a mirror shine. I knew a guy who used buffing wheels as his final sharpening stages and green chromium oxide was second to last. The last stage was jewelers rouge.

 

Jim

post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 

On the same website I found this interesting Diamond Lapping Films that come in different grits: 15;3;0.5;0.1 microns.

http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=68943&cat=1,43072

Anybody had any first hand experience with them, especially 0.5 and 0.1 microns as final polishing stages? They have adhesive back, so I can easily "glue" it to the back side of my strop. Looking very appealing in my newbie eyes....

 

 

 

Quote:
I use it and one stick has lasted me about 2 years and about 5K knives. I'm only maybe 1/3 through with it.

Wow, that's pretty cost effective! Do you have a leather strop you use this compound on?

post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by mostadonte2 View Post

Wow, that's pretty cost effective! Do you have a leather strop you use this compound on?

I have a few strops and leather belts that I use it on.

 

Jim

post #7 of 9

What is it with you and Lee Valley's carpenter's tool sharpening supplies?

 

Why would you want to strop a 10" kitchen knife on a 4x6 surface?  The 3M films LV sells are the wrong size for stropping kitchen knives.  Go with compound or "slurries," spread, splashed or sprayed (and spread) on mdf, leather, felt or whatever.  

 

I'm using US Products diamond and CBN water-based slurries, and HandAmerican water-based spray diamond slurry and boron paste on balsa.

 

When you're shopping for compound you want to be aware that the oil and oil/soap compound bases can irritate sensitive skin -- go for water-based slurries and pastes rather than oil.  The water-based compounds are almost always easier than oil for getting an even spread on the sorts of strops we use for hand stropping also.  So... 
 

USP stuff is pretty inexpensive as those things go, but at it's most concentrated it's still kind of dilute -- so you have to really douse your strop.  Even so, it's still more cost effective than any of the other alternatives I know.

If you want to try USP, here's a link to the purchasing page for their pain in the ass website.  Remember, "Slurries," not "Compounds," and also remember -- when you get to the option -- to choose the "Heavy" concentration.

    

HA stuff is very good, but on the expensive side.  I happen to have a lot on hand, and also have a very friendly and good relationship with Keith deGrau, the really great guy who is HA.  So, I don't mind spending a little extra for it, and think you shouldn't either.   I like using HA diamond more than USP, because it's an easier water-based alternative.  Available at CKtG. 

 

Ken Schwartz has some really nice, ultra-concentrated CBN out, but it's too expensive. 

 

FYI, the green chromium oxide followed by red jeweler's rouge is very old school razor sharpening.  There's nothing really wrong with it for razors, knives or tools; but there's new stuff that's faster, cleaner, easier and better.  Effective sharpening is technology, not tradition.

 

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 7/5/13 at 8:48am
post #8 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
What is it with you and Lee Valley's carpenter's tool sharpening supplies?

It's the only store located locally that sell variety of sharpening tools. And in my head if it's good for chisel, it's good for knife - both are made out of comparable steels. Keep in mind that any US web site usually ships to Canada for $35+, hence a $10 compound will cost $45 + possible taxes and brokerage fees.

Something cheap for you, converts to something not so for us, northern neighbors.

 

I will take a look at the options provided, maybe I will be able to find a decent shipping price somewhere or local suppliers.

Thanks again BDL.

post #9 of 9

Darn!  The Maple Leaf thing again!  Canadian location makes many things different. 

 

Lee Valley is an excellent store and Leonard Lee is one of the giants of 20th Century sharpening theory and practice.  However, the Lee Valley catalog has some limitations both in terms of the completeness of the information it provides, and -- less so -- in the sharpening materials it makes available. 

 

In some ways knives -- kitchen knives in particular -- are like carpentry tools and razors, but in some very important ways they are not.  You want to get things which are the right sizes and shapes.  You also want to avoid obsolete materials in favor of more effective modern ones if there are any available.   

 

BDL 

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