or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Pastries & Baking › Question regarding homemade cake flour vs. store brand cake flour:
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Question regarding homemade cake flour vs. store brand cake flour:

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Hello out there. Here recently, I have stumbled upon quite a few blogs/websites with posts suggesting that cake flour is nothing more than all-purpose flour mixed with corn starch. So, I have been experimenting with homemade cake flour to see for myself. Here's the rub: the cake I baked with the homemade concoction turned out ok to me; however, I am an amateur cook who doesn't know what to look for other than how a cake tastes in this situation.

 

So my question to you seasoned cooks/bakers out there is this: is store brand cake flour really Evian water for novice bakers or is there a real difference between the homemade stuff and the store brand?  

post #2 of 9

Um, I'm fairly certain that "stroe brand cake flour" is NOT simply A/P flour and corn starch.

 

Cake flour, as I understand it, is made from soft, low protein, wheat and is only wheat flour. Different wheats, http://www.smallgrains.org/whfacts/6classwh.htm, are used to produce different classes of flour, basically:

  • Bread flour (high protein)
  • All purpose flour (medium protein)
  • Pastry (Cake) flour (low protein)

 

Now, a passable substitute when you cannot get cake flour is to reduce the amount of all purpose and add corn starch, thus diluting the protein level, but that, IMHO, is NOT home made cake flour.

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
post #3 of 9

deleted.


Edited by Antilope - 7/11/13 at 11:21am
post #4 of 9

Here in the deep south I've been using what I think is soft wheat from White Lily.  Their bread flour clocks in at 4g protein per serving and AP at 3g a serving.  What brings the flour down a notch is its SOFTNESS.  It's I think a  soft wheat flour.  So consider the bread flour actually an AP flour and the AP flour a cake flour.  It's good nonetheless.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the input and link.smile.gif
 

post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the descriptions. smile.gif

post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thanks, I'll give White Lily a try.smile.gif
 

post #8 of 9

If you are not in the South you might have trouble finding White Lily. Here in my part of the Midwest all you can find is Swan's Down Cake Flour. 

post #9 of 9

deleted.


Edited by Antilope - 7/11/13 at 11:21am
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Pastries & Baking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Pastries & Baking › Question regarding homemade cake flour vs. store brand cake flour: