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egg tempering

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
Referring to eggs into milk, is the traditional tempering process actually needed, or can you just whip the cold eggs into the cold milk, then bring up the heat while stirring constantly? I understand the need for tempering is to avoid largely contrasting temperatures to avoid accidentally scrambling your eggs, but it seems like a waste of effort if they could just both be mixed together while still the same refrigerated temperature...

2nd question. Without me spending a whole day in a kitchen experimenting with trial and error and burning through gallons of milk and crates of egg: is there a maximum ratio of egg to milk that can be brought to 180F? obviously if I put straight egg into a double boiler and slowly brought the temp up to 180F while stirring, I'd probably end up with scrambled eggs. So what is the minimum amount of milk needed to keep the egg protein from solidifying?
post #2 of 5

What are you attempting to accomplish?
 

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #3 of 5
Thread Starter 
I guess I'll go ahead and state my business because I know I'm going to get asked, lol. The whole purpose of this is an attempt to dramatically increase the protein in a yogurt.

I know it sounds weird, but I've been enjoying playing with yogurts and trying new techniques the past few months, and have successfully made a few batches of some interesting stuff. Going in a different direction now. Any answers would be helpful, but I'll make sure to post results in a separate thread.

But in direct correlation with my original questions. My thought process is 1. I already first bring my milk to 180 before cooling, do if I could do the same with my eggs I can get an initial sterilization. 2. The bacteria that preserves the milk will do the same with eggs mixed in. (I already consume raw eggs semi regularly, so I'm not super concerned with it, I just always work with fresh eggs from healthy chickens and always wash my shells before cracking)
Edited by owendavidj - 7/7/13 at 9:59pm
post #4 of 5

OK, so your objective is to achieve a pasteurized (not sterilized wink.gif) milk/egg mixture that you can then cool and inoculate with bacteria to produce high protein yogurt?

 

You ARE aware that some egg proteins begin to coagulate at 158°F and virtually all of them do so at 180°F, correct?

 

You are NOT using pasteurized eggs, correct?

 

You ARE using pasteurized milk, correct?

 

Are you aware that eggs are pasteurized when the yolk reaches 138°F, well below the initial coagulation temperature of 158°F?

 

So, if you are attempting to achieve a pasteurized milk/egg mixture, why are you raising the temperature to 180°F, which is equal to or above the temperature at which eggs coagulate?
 

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
post #5 of 5
Thread Starter 
Sweet! Thanks that helps a lot. I knew I came to the right place. Thanks for pointing out a major flaw. So I am using regular eggs with pasteurized milk. Ideally I should bring the mixtures temp to 140F and hold for a minute or so, then start cooling back towards my inoculation temp....solid. I'm trying some batches over the next few days.
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