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Fried chicken sauce

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Hey y'all,

Looking for inspiration for a new sauce to go with fried chicken. Sure we've heard honey butter and maple syrup, but I'm looking for new and fresh. Thoughts?!
post #2 of 17

"Milk gravy" as they call it here, Bechamel with lots of pepper.. Is great on fried chicken.

post #3 of 17

Alabama White Sauce - made famous by Big Bob Gibson's Bar-B-Q

(traditionally for BBQ chicken but works really good on fried chicken as well)

 

There are many versions out there - they are all pretty darn close with just a few tweaks to suit the individual palette.  The original is supposedly still 'secret' but I think that it's more a marketing gimmik.  

 

Anyway if you want to read about it Here is the story ...    http://www.amazingribs.com/recipes/chicken_turkey_duck/big_bob_gibsons_white_sauce.html

Great site also!

 

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Here is the favourite one from Chris Lilly's book on Big Bob Gibsons Bar-B-Q. 

 

Big Bob Gibson's Bar-B-Q White Sauce

 

2 cups mayonnaise

1 cup distilled white vinegar

1/2 cup apple juice

2 teaspoons prepared horseradish

2 teaspoons ground black pepper

2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice

1 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper

 

In a large bowl, combine all the ingredients and blend well.

Use as a marinade, baste, or dipping sauce.

Store refrigerated in an airtight container for up to 2 weeks.

 

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This is the one that MeatHead reverse engineered... and Chris Lily said he'd have to try.

 

Recipe

Makes. 1.5 cups of sauce, enough for 2 large chickens or 3 Cornish game hens, which serves 4 to 6 people

Preparation time. 10 minutes for the sauce, about 45 minutes to cook the meat

 

Ingredients

3/4 cup mayonnaise

1/3 cup apple cider vinegar

1/4 cup lemon juice

1/4 cup apple juice

1 tablespoon powdered garlic

1 tablespoon prepared horseradish from a jar (either in vinegar or creamy)

1 tablespoons coarsely ground black pepper

1 teaspoon mustard powder

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon finely ground cayenne pepper

 

Method

1) Whisk together all the ingredients in a large bowl and refrigerate in a jar for at least 2 hours, if possible, to allow the flavors to meld.

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #4 of 17

Asian Fried Chicken dipping sauces. (loosely Thai / Vietnamese...sorta -ish )

 

Quick and dirty version...

 

2 tbsp Sweet Chilli Sauce

1 tbsp Fish Sauce

juice of 1 lemon or 2 limes (I prefer limes)

2 tsp light soy sauce

1 green onion (or shallot) finely diced

 

Combine and let sit for 15 minutes at room temp - serve with extra lime or lemon wedges.

 

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Vietnamese Dipping Sauce (Nuoc Cham)

 

Ingredients:

1/2 cup sugar

1 cup warm water

1/2 cup fish sauce

1/4 cup white vinegar

1/2 of a lime, juiced

3-4 cloves of garlic , minced

2-3 Thai chili pepper, minced

 

Directions:

1) In a small sealable jar, combine water, sugar, vinegar and lime juice.  Shake well to dissolve the sugar.

 

2) Adjust the flavours to taste, more lime / vinegar more sugar or water - you want a nice tasting lime drink.  Alternatively buy a nice flavoured lime drink that isn't carbonated.

 

3) Add fish sauce, garlic and chili peppers.

 

The sauce is best at room temperature, but must be stored in the refrigerator.

 

Makes about 2.5 cups

 

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Andrea Nguyen

has a very well thought out and logical method for making Nuoc Cham.

http://www.vietworldkitchen.com/blog/2008/11/basic-vietnamese-dipping-sauce-nuoc-cham.html

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply
post #5 of 17

To stay on an Asian theme:

How about a tandoori sauce (mix tandoori spice with yoghurt and some lemon),

Or better still, marinate your chicken in it and cook it on the barbecue (to me tandoori chicken needs no sauce, but you can use the above as a dipping sauce if you want)

 

Chili sauce

For a low calorie one, mix some chili paste or hot pickled lemon paste with yoghurt

 

Or not so Asian:

Mustard honey sauce

Mayonaisse with whatever flavour (curry, garlic, chili). If you use the stick blender it only takes 20 seconds or so to make the mayonaisse

Life is too short to drink bad wine
---Anonymus---

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Life is too short to drink bad wine
---Anonymus---

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post #6 of 17
Thread Starter 

   Love the white sauce idea, especially with the horseradish.  Although I do love an Asian inspired sauce with chicken, I'm looking for more of a traditional sauce idea.  I found a "Delta" sauce with a mayo base, pickles, hot sauce, garlic, paprika and worcestershire. I'm thinking I might add our pickled fresno and serrano chilis as the pickled element.  Perhaps its not "traditional" in the traditional sense, but it definitely has the elements that speak of the south.  Keep those ideas coming please!

post #7 of 17

Pan gravy made from chicken livers, hearts and gizzards with some thyme or sage and stock.  Cook it all with a little onion and garlic, thicken with a roux and strain.

Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
post #8 of 17
Fire roasted red pepper cilantro coulis
-fire roasted red peppers
-white wine vine
-onion
-cilantro
-siracha
-a little honey if needed
-s/p

Drizzle that over the chicken with some lime aoli
post #9 of 17

I personally love a roquefort sauce with my fried chicken. Perhaps a roquefort and chives?

 

I also like the traditional hot and spicy sauce to go with it too. Two classics that are die-hards.

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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post #10 of 17

Here's one that I found interesting.   Got to chatting and one of the line cooks said he worked a pretty decent place that had 'chicken-n-cheese'... I did a bit of a double take and asked him to explain.  (you never know... eh?)

 

So you take a couple types of hard aged cheese, maybe even three - parmesan, assiago and sovrano.   What ever you want really - you just want them shredded medium / large that way each bite is a bit different.

 

Take your shredded cheese and mix in a good helping of cracked black pepper and what ever level you like of course ground chilli pepper flakes.

 

You lift the chicken in the baskets and immediately dump in a large bowl - don't let it drain or rest - you need the residual heat and oil.    

 

Shake on the above mixture as thick or thin as you like and flip the bowl until it is all melted into the chicken.

 

 You can adapt this by adding sour-cream powder, onion powder and chives, or vinegar powder and ground dill.   

Giving you sour-cream and onion fried chicken and Dill Pickle fried chicken.

 

I've never made nor even tried any of these combo's but they seemed to make sense as explained to me.

If you have any questions I'll relay them.

 

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Totally separate-

Creamy Buffalo Wing Dip

 

Half  Franks Red-Hot Sauce

Half Creamy Ranch Salad Dressing (Richardsons)

 

alternately and a bit better...

 

Half Franks Red-Hot Sauce

1/4 Creamy Ranch Salad Dressing (Richardsons)

1/4 Creamy Caesar Salad Dressing (Richardsons)

 

You don't have to use Richardsons - it is nothing special just the usual 'upper-level' sysco brand name, any will do just fine.

 

The first is pretty bland and has mass appeal as it's mostly fat and some flavor with a bit of pop from the Franks.

 

The second is still pretty tame in terms of heat but it adds a decent amount of garlic and other seasonings to make it my preference if I have to make sauces out of sysco bottles.

 

Last one (before I die of embarrassment) Garlicy Chipotle Ranch Dipping Sauce

 

1/4 Chipotle BBQ sauce (Smoking Stampede is the brand i think?... doesn't really matter)

1/4 Honey Garlic 

1/4 Creamy Ranch

1/8 Franks Red Hot

1/8 Water or water/vinegar half and half.

 

Super stupid simple but really darn tasty - you can modify it as you need.  Keeping it simple as above will make ordering and cost calculations much easier, but the sky's the limit.

 

PS- cooked or canned beets that are finely shredded and added to the above make it "Devil's Blood Dip"...   ok i'm stopping now...

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply
post #11 of 17
Thread Starter 

Was talking to my wine director who is from the south.  He mentioned Jezebel sauce.  Heres a blurb from Saveur.

 

The spicy-sweet sauce, some say, is named after the wicked biblical temptress. It's often just poured over a block of cream cheese and eaten with crackers. This recipe comes from Southern Sideboards, a 1978 Junior League cookbook from Jackson, Mississippi. This is a great dish for large summer gatherings.

 

FOR THE SAUCE:
3 tbsp. prepared horseradish, drained
3 tbsp. dry mustard
3⁄4 cup pineapple preserves
3⁄4 cup apple jelly
1 tbsp. coarsely ground black pepper

 

Could be good with chicken, but mos def with a pork dish.  Never made apple jelly before tho....


Edited by cacioEpepe - 7/12/13 at 8:45pm
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by cacioEpepe View Post

Was talking to my wine director who is from the south.  He mentioned Jezebel sauce.  Heres a blurb from Saveur.

 

The spicy-sweet sauce, some say, is named after the wicked biblical temptress. It's often just poured over a block of cream cheese and eaten with crackers. This recipe comes from Southern Sideboards, a 1978 Junior League cookbook from Jackson, Mississippi. This is a great dish for large summer gatherings.

 

FOR THE SAUCE:
3 tbsp. prepared horseradish, drained
3 tbsp. dry mustard
3⁄4 cup pineapple preserves
3⁄4 cup apple jelly
1 tbsp. coarsely ground black pepper

 

Could be good with chicken, but mod def with a pork dish.  Never made apple jelly before tho....

That is neet!

 

seems a bit stiff - but I haven't tried it yet..

 

I will soon.

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply
post #13 of 17

A great sauce that would go over huge in the South would be a Bourbon Maple Butter.

 

I think it's best made to order, which is really quick in a skillet. You can put some chicken stock in a hot skillet, add some Bourbon and maple syrup, reduce to around half the amount of sauce you want, then stir in an equal amount of butter. Using equal fat and liquid should give you a pretty smooth, consistent sauce. You may have to add some more chicken stock at the end if your liquid is reducing too fast. I don't list ingredient amounts because the ratio of Bourbon and maple syrup can vary greatly depending on their quality. The better the bourbon and maple, the more chicken stock that can be used.

Brandon O'Dell

 

Friend That Cooks Home Chef Service

www.friendthatcooks.com

O'Dell Restaurant Consulting

www.bodellconsulting.com

 

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Brandon O'Dell

 

Friend That Cooks Home Chef Service

www.friendthatcooks.com

O'Dell Restaurant Consulting

www.bodellconsulting.com

 

Reply
post #14 of 17

Sweet tea syrup. Did it for a wedding party with a nouvelle Southern theme and the people loved it.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #15 of 17
Thread Starter 

Sweet tea syrup!  I dig it.  Did you make the tea and then reduce with sugar?  Seems like it would be too sweet and lack tea flavor?  Do tell cheflayne!

post #16 of 17

Make simple syrup. Bring up to simmer and add black tea teaves. Cover and let steep 5 minutes or so. Strain.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #17 of 17
Thread Starter 
Gangster
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