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has about had it with the industry.

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
I almost had enough with this industry. One week I'm working 40+ hours the next week I have two shifts. Making crappy money at tha( for someone who is more experianced and better then 90% of the kids coming out of school. No offence. Having to deal with owners and head servers who think there chefs and know better then kitchen staff. Does this bs happen everywhere or am I just being unrealistic with my expectations?
post #2 of 17
You opened a can of worms, mate... but yeah - if being a cook was easy, everyone would do it. Your desire for inner-peace doesn't drive you; your impulsive lust for perfection does. When you are not seeing results, you're pissed off. That is the same from Phoenix to Boston to London to Frankfurt to Sardinia to Paris.
Do or Do not - There is no Try. - Yoda
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Do or Do not - There is no Try. - Yoda
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post #3 of 17

yes, it is the same everywhere.  On top of that, just remember, it's ALWAYS the kitchen's fault.  Steaks/food over cooked?  Doesn't matter that it sat under the heat of the pass window continuing to cook, waiting for the waitstaff to decide that all the drinks and whatever else they are doing has been taken care of before the food can go out, it's STILL the kitchen's fault.  And then they wonder why Chef's are almost always in a bad mood.

post #4 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheflardon View Post

I almost had enough with this industry. One week I'm working 40+ hours the next week I have two shifts. Making crappy money at tha( for someone who is more experianced and better then 90% of the kids coming out of school. No offence. Having to deal with owners and head servers who think there chefs and know better then kitchen staff. Does this bs happen everywhere or am I just being unrealistic with my expectations?

Well well well.....first off...welcome to Cheftalk.

 

Those of us who have many years under our belts, have seen this our whole careers.

No...you are not alone.

Food service is not for everyone, and it sure isn't for the money......

 

Advice?

 

Get a grip, deal with it or...............walk away and never look back.

Harsh words?.......perhaps.......why should it be sugar coated when it isn't?

post #5 of 17

most of the time your doing clean-up work or stupid chore-like jobs....

 

yes, and then you see the happy faces of the people who enjoy the food!

 

sometimes it even looks like WORK! ;-)

post #6 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefross View Post

Well well well.....first off...welcome to Cheftalk.

 

Those of us who have many years under our belts, have seen this our whole careers.

No...you are not alone.

Food service is not for everyone, and it sure isn't for the money......

 

Advice?

 

Get a grip, deal with it or...............walk away and never look back.

Harsh words?.......perhaps.......why should it be sugar coated when it isn't?

 

Word.

post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefross View Post

Well well well.....first off...welcome to Cheftalk.

 

Those of us who have many years under our belts, have seen this our whole careers.

No...you are not alone.

Food service is not for everyone, and it sure isn't for the money......

 

Advice?

 

Get a grip, deal with it or...............walk away and never look back.

Harsh words?.......perhaps.......why should it be sugar coated when it isn't?

yerp , sums ut up :P

Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

Reply

Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

Reply
post #8 of 17
It always makes the cooks happy when I stay after service to help clean and close. Cooking is about the whole experience, not just what happens from line to window.
Do or Do not - There is no Try. - Yoda
Reply
Do or Do not - There is no Try. - Yoda
Reply
post #9 of 17

I've occasionally have some cooks that come up with an interesting way they look at things.  When hired, they're all told they will be working at all duties, including dishes, prep, etc. along with myself and everyone else.

 

They agreed that they were aware of this, as they had great experience, when hired.  All also mentioned how hard they were willing to work, how fast they are, etc. etc.

30-40 days into the job, they reduce their speed by 75%, and stand around (or lean) doing nothing if no orders are up.

 

I tell them to please get to work.  They say they were hired to cook.  Not clean, not prep, etc.

 

I finally wised up just a bit and just say ok.  Fine.  Lunch is over, so you can clock out.  Etc. etc. etc.

 

What some employees don't realize, and it's probably our fault for not saying more positive things to them, but we absolutely know who is conscientious and pulls their weight, even helping others.

What I mean is, very little gets past an owner, good or bad. 

 

Hmm.  Now that I'm thinking about it, I think I'll make an extra effort tomorrow to do a little back-slapping and say a few well-dones.

post #10 of 17
Quote:
I almost had enough with this industry.



Good, get out. 

post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by cacioEpepe View Post

Word.

Thats funny and spot on.
post #12 of 17

It isn't for everyone, that's for sure. If you don't like the restaurant industry, get out and find what you love.

 

For me, the kitchen is a game of highs and lows. When things are high, they're high; but when things are low, my god are they low.

 

It helps when you have a kitchen and crew you love. My fellow cooks and I genuinely care about each other and watch each others' backs, so the camaraderie is one thing that keeps me going. The passion for food and perfectionism also drives me, and I know that deep down inside I feel good knowing I'm getting my butt kicked during service or what have you, because it means I'm not sitting on my laurels.

 

The kitchen is a capricious lover. Court her wisely.

post #13 of 17

Happens to the best of us. One week ill go into overtime, the next week ill only be scheduled for 3 shifts (and then I get phone calls on my days off asking me to work)

 

And telling people to just "get out" is easier said then done. Personally I'd love to get out of food service. Unfortunately its the only industry I have experience in (8+ years). Its not that easy to move on. 

post #14 of 17
Hi there , been there almost wanting to quit as a chef , glad I didn't .
There is always something better out there , as a rule I will only work in a place where I would want to eat myself
Sadly at the moment my job is kind of sucky but really alright , so I look for something better .
Don't give up , things will be better....if you want them to ....there are worse jobs out there
I have had jobs which the pay isn't enough to keep you till the end of the week and jobs where I've been rolling in dough, I guess it's a ying yang thing .
However if the industry really isn't for you , the best thing to do is find another profession
post #15 of 17
Thread Starter 
Hey everyone thanks for the advice. That was just a bad day haha. Needed to vent.
post #16 of 17

I want to high jack this topic to bring something else up that bothers me. Cooking is a craft and for the most part serious cooks go to different places to learn new things. That being said, almost every place I've worked the Chef or GM has "run" various restaurants in their career. Some good and some bad. And it's starting to become quite alarming how high the turnover rate must be at the top level in order for this to be the norm everywhere I go. I never have the courage to ask at the time when someone is telling me about their incredible last job that paid 60k to 100k to ask why would they ever leave that comfortable situation?

post #17 of 17

Being comfortable doesn't mean you're happy.  Like you said, this is a craft. A craft that is always evolving.  One may not make more money somewhere else, but it might further their craft.  Chasing the money in this industry might make you temporarily happy, but if youre not completely, or nearly, content at the job, the money doesn't mean that much.  It would be safe to say that most of the people in restaurants don't like staying idle.  We like to move about, see and do new things, and this translates into the high turnover in our industry.  Hell, I've been a sous chef or chef de cuisine at 4 different restaurants and I'm only 31.  That being said, I've stayed at 4 different restaurants for at least 20 months each, some longer.  Days are gone where the chef stays with a restaurant for 20 years.  

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