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about different countries shifs and timetables

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

First of all, not sure if this should go here, so if someone decides to move it, just fell free to do it

 

So has I said at my presentation post. Nowadays I´m working in Iceland, and one of the thinks i LOVE (no, it isnt Icelandic traditional food) is the working shifs. One week I´m just working 2 days and next week I work the other 5, 12 hours each day. Do in one month I have 15 days free. This is at each restaurant and hotel, all the cooks working here have the same timetable

I never hear about someone doing that kind of timetables in Spain

 

I would like to know at what other countries they work with this kind of timetables

I have been checking Ireland and its like Spain, 40 hours per week 5 days

Denmark its like Iceland for example

Curious about timetables in Australia, New Zealand and Nordic Countries

 

Thanks a lot!!

Juan

post #2 of 5

Pretty sure it's like that in Denmark. Restaurants have certain opening hours and they stick to them. In England, shifts of 12-15 hours are not uncommon, but that would be unheard of in Denmark.

post #3 of 5

When I left Switzerland in '91 we were working 5 days a week,* with the day being split into two shifts, the Swiss loved to call the afternoon break "Zimmerstunde" ( roughly translated as Room hour), never figured that one out.....  Sometimes you got lucky and got the afternoon "Garde" shift and worked through a whole 8 hr shift, but usually it was the split shift. 

 

Doubt if things have changed since then.....

 

 

 

*Don't snicker now, it was only in '82 did the Swiss finally enforce a 5 day week for hospitality workers, before that it was 51/2 days, with the half-day almost always morphing into a full day.  When I worked in Singapore from '91-'96 it was officially a 51/2 day work week, supposed to be a 7 hr working day, but the employers would do their darnest to stretch it into a 9 or 10 hr day (You hear me, Mr. F'nB Manager at "The American Club"?????)

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #4 of 5

in my country netherlands it varies wildly.

some places just have you working for x hours a week no matter what day.

another place I worked, I did 5 days / week 50 hours, shift varied 12 till end or 2 pm till end

current place has more strict rules, all chefs have 3 days a week off…. depending on the schedule one week I have three days a row off and four working days, or two days on and off etc...

 

so in netherlands there are no strict rules, the owners decide about the opening times…except CLOSING times, most restaurant kitchens over here usually close between 10 pm and 11 pm with some exceptions.

mind I say restaurants….. not eateries/ snackbars etc

post #5 of 5

In my country Brazil

 

It is pretty normal for you to work 8 hours a day *cough be prepared to work at least 11 though* and have a day off on a monday. 

Pretty normal someone work Tuesday-Sunday or Monday - Saturday with only 1 day off a week. 

 

In some cases the day before your break you may only work half a shift but its not all places though. 

 

Just like any restaurant you start clean up after the last client leaves...

And you should not worry about working long hours, because trust me you will if they want you to lol. 

 

Also at least in my town i have found it very rare to work in 2 brigades (lunch and dinner) , usually the people who work lunch will work dinner. 

2 Brigades is rare so if you want to work fine dining or work at a reputable place be prepared to work 12-15 hours.... sad i know :rolleyes:

 

Yesterday had an interview, restaurant opens at 5pm-2am

Saturday 11am-2am

Sunday 11am-5pm

But you are obviously in the kitchen doing prep way before opening lol 

 

Restaurant closes on Mondays

Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

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Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

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