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Do I give my employer a discount for catering their parties?

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
Hello! Through a weird series of coincidences, I just started working at a Golf Center as the only employee of the cafe portion. (I was filling in for an absent chef and then that chef never showed up again. The owners hired me at the same rate the other guy was paying me, plus I get the use of a licensed kitchen for my own business.) The Golf Center will be having events starting in the fall, and I will have the opportunity to cater those parties. I'm not at all sure what to charge my employer for my services. Do I charge less than usual since the job is through them? It seems like I should. I need to get this straight before we have the money talk. Advice? And thanks!

Nicole
post #2 of 5

Are you the only person he is offering these events to? Is he putting menus out to bid from other caterers. The word discount throws me off a bit....its up to you how much or how little you want to make off a particular job. Is that a discount/ maybe...yes. This time of year in Fla. we are willing to go out for less and we do w/every customer

Are these events at Employers location?

You don't necessarily have to give a "discount " but comps are always nice. Free barrels of Lemonade or SweetTea..even something as simple and easy as a special cocktail or free upgrade linen. You want to sell them on using you for all their events.

I think you need to get a little more info on what they expect before you talk $. Make it work to their advantage to use you only and you will get your $ too.

Keep us posted...I would like to hear what others think.

post #3 of 5

Since you are using his facility for your own personal gain .I would charge him a cost plus percentage and labor. One hand washes the other.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #4 of 5
Thread Starter 
thanks, y'all!

people rent out the place where i work for parties, and i would always be the default chef for those parties. the venue is really, really nice and the clientele are mostly golf people. this kind of thing is one reason i accepted their kind of low pay--I will definitely be the one cooking, and i can also use the kitchen for my own side business. so i'm helping them by running their kitchen during business hours for not a ton of $ & also helping customers if i'm there doing stuff for my own business, and they are helping me by selling my products, letting me use their licensed kitchen, and using me for their parties.

usually i'd do the $350 (or more depending on # of guests & length of party) + expenses thing. some of the people having parties are people i'm getting to know as they come in for lunch, some will be the owner's friends/acquaintances, others will be people who just like the venue. my employer is REALLY excited to have me there because she's had bad experiences with guest chefs in the kitchen. i'm not trying to get exact numbers from y'all, just a general idea of what is usually done in this kind of circumstance, so when we do talk, (which will be soon, she mentioned something about it this afternoon!), i can seem knowledgeable and will know for sure that it will be worth my time. are there guidelines for this sort of thing?
post #5 of 5

Ed hit the mark with his answer and I want to add to his reply.

I would hammer out the answers to your questions and have a signed contract in hand before the first function is booked.

Address the Facility, Members and Public separately in the contract.

Stuff like can you use the facility purveyors (and discount) for your privately booked jobs and who will do the actual face to face with clients  when dates are booked and menus are initialed (this is the part that can make or break you)

No one (well except me) can read minds and it may cause a huge problem if the house (Owners and Member functions) is just thinking you would get OT plus bonus (or whatever) with the ingredients bought and paid for (cost) and the bill sent to payables for them to take care of.

It sounds like the dream gig and would be a pity if the partnership were to dissolve over a case of chicken breasts.

 

mimi

 

* You might want to have a rider stating the original contract to be reviewed and any changes made (time frame here).

Gives both parties time to settle in and have all the bugs worked out.

 

m.

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