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Grilled corn on the cob

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

There's a bewildering variety of approaches on the InterWebs. What have people here found works best for barbequing corn on the cob?

post #2 of 7

Off hand I'd say there are the soakers, the in-huskers and the direct fire to the kernels approach. Each technique offers different results. What results do you like? There those who mix and match a bit as well.

 

I've not found soaking in salt/sugar water to really offer anything to the grilled result if the corn is fresh. If it's not fresh, grilling won't help it any anyway so I don't subscribe to this approach.

 

Grilling while well wrapped in the husk yields more of a steamed approach. Not a lot of flavor penetration. Still good to eat if the corn is fresh.

 

For my taste, I find that if the corn is fresh, I just want it to get hot. It doesn't really need more cooking than that to make me happy. So I want it husked, brushed with melted butter or olive oil, S&P and onto a HOT grill. Get a little color, which doesn't take long, turn, repeat 'til done. Refresh the butter and eat NOW!

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 7

I like it soaked for an hour with the husk on in plain water, the bbq'd in the husk. You get a toasty, nutty taste as the husk dries out and chars in places

"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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post #4 of 7

I split mine the long way on the band-saw. This way its all uniform.   I spray with a bit of oil and grill over med. flames., then sprinkle with salt pepper and a touch of sugar

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefedb View Post

I split mine the long way on the band-saw. This way its all uniform.   I spray with a bit of oil and grill over med. flames., then sprinkle with salt pepper and a touch of sugar

Do you leave the husk on?  

"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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post #6 of 7

I take the husk off, then wrap in foil with a little butter.  I keep watching for the roadside corn stands to pop up!

post #7 of 7

No I do not. Only time I roast in the husk is for a BBQ

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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