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What is butter?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
Back in the day, way back, we used to clarify butter for saute by the gallons. We would clarify 20 lb blocks, use the clarified and toss the other white part I think we called solids.

The only reason to do this now is if you're using the clear to saute or if you need butter oil, I guess.

The point i'm making is that the butter "solids" should be considered butter stock, akin to chicken stock.

If you need clarified butter in your kitchen, save the solids. Add a little to soups or gravies. Be careful though, they're very salty like chicken base.

If you're serving pasta, mix a little with some marinara, toss with pasta, and plate up.

With the popularity of evoo, I'm not sure if this practice is as common as it once was way back when.

Chow
Jimbo
post #2 of 7

The solids from clarified butter are awesome on popcorn.

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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 7

I'm with you guys - there is no reason to "discard the solids" as so many TV "chefs" advocate.

post #4 of 7

Deleted.


Edited by Cerise - 7/23/13 at 5:23am
post #5 of 7

Not altogether true. A clarified  butter is one that all impurities and salt are  removed. It will hardly ever burn like regular butter. Gives a totally different taste  to a  finished product.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #6 of 7

Butter divides into 3 layers.

The top foam is discarded fat.

The middle is the clarified butter and the bottom is the water,

milk solids, which sink because they are heavier than the fats.

Those milk solids are excellent for baking and cooking.

I add the milk solids to mashed potatoes, or a cream soup for extra richness.

No don't toss that stuff.

post #7 of 7

I'll second the use of milk solids for mashed pots.

 

I'll also second discarding any foam.  Any foam, IMHO, is dead protein--be it from meat stocks, boiling potatoes, or even making jams.  It's dead protein, it's garbage, and should be tossed

 

I think "we" are over the discussion of whether to use whole or clarified butter for Hollandaise.  But clarified butter has it's uses in the kitchen, albeit very expensive ones.

 

Now that I'm in the "dark side" of the kitchen (pastry) I tend to use clarified butter frequently for ganaches.  But I use unsalted butter, and clarify it on the stove to the stage where the milk solids stick to the bottom of the pan and start to caramelize, Beurre Noisette?  In any case it really heightens the flavour and contributes a nutty flavour.  But the main reason I do this is to increase the shelf life for my ganaches......

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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