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Coconut Oil

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
Has any one experimented substituting coconut oil for butter in cakes and pastry recipes? I would like to make the subsistution in my white cakes first to give it a try. Is there a subsistution ratio or is it switch one for the other in equal amounts? Are the any other ingredient changes i need to account? I wonder if it will change the exterior apperance (browning, ridging, smooth; dry surface, spotty; tacky surface, etc). And how it will effect the interior texture, if at all? Will the cake be moist, tender, airy, with a fine crumble or will it be dence or dry?
If I hear positive results and suggests from my foodie friends and if my cakes bake beautifully then my plan is to move on to pastries. I have been in the mood for carrot cake, Madeleine's and Canneles de Bourdeaux. Quite a jump, huh?
post #2 of 11

Remember, butter is 15%-20% (depending on brand, generally 18%) water, so, 1 cup of butter (226.8g) is actually 34-45g of water and 182-193g of fat.

 

Coconut oil has long been used in baking and pastries.
 

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #3 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeteMcCracken View Post...

Coconut oil has long been used in baking and pastries.
 

In what capacity????  ...same as lard?

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #4 of 11

As a major fat in baking, until saturated fats became suspect.
 

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #5 of 11

Inert problems in all "tropical" oils is the high % cholesterol (Jams the arteries)

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #6 of 11

And so what was the advantage in using tropical oils in baking?  They were cheap?

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #7 of 11

OK, here is an article to get you started: http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/03/02/cooking-with-coconut-oil/?_r=0

 

As I have worked as a consultant specializing in the use of coconut oil, I will refrain from commenting.

 

There is a wealth of information on the internet, some good, some not so good, some really peculiar!

 

If I am able to locate historical references, I'll post them.

 

Be cautious when using the web as a reference, as with many non-main stream ideas, there are some who, shall we say, are a bit over zealous, both as advocates and opponents?
 

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 
@Pete thank you for your first message regarding substitution. I am brand new to all of this so please forgive me for sounding so junior league but I'm here because I need help learning and I'm hoping to find good people here to give me a hand.
I am interested in learning how to write your own recipes. Understanding what goes in and how it works. If I understood you correctly, you mentioned the % fat in butter. Is that the amount I would sub for the coconut oil and then add the remaining weight in water so not worry about the % water from the butter?
Any links or info you can point me to in the direction of learning about these things I'd appreciate it! Thanks!
post #9 of 11

That is how I would do it.

 

Say recipe calls for, um, 1 pound of butter (16 ounces = 454g) and the butter is, um say, 80% butterfat. 454g X 0.80 = 363.2g fat; 454 - 363.2 = 90.8g water

 

Substitute 363g coconut oil and 91g water
 

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 
thanks Pete! I'm super excited to get baking. I wish I had the day off tomorrow rolleyes.gif
You seem to have a wealth of knowledge in this area. Jealous!
post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeteMcCracken View Post

That is how I would do it.

 

Say recipe calls for, um, 1 pound of butter (16 ounces = 454g) and the butter is, um say, 80% butterfat. 454g X 0.80 = 363.2g fat; 454 - 363.2 = 90.8g water

 

Substitute 363g coconut oil and 91g water
 


that's what I was looking for, that measurement.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
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