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Smoked Salmon Terrine (simple)

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

This is a Smoked Salmon and Goat Cheese Terrine that I made the other day. But that is not what this thread is really about.

The  easiness of a terrine comes from picking your favorite ingredients and then layering all those flavors together. It is summertime and I thought of making a terrine that expressed that with the flavors  I enjoy. For this particular terrine , I used pressure and not gelatine to hold it together. Both techniques work well. In the case of certain fragile ingredients, the use of a broth held with gelatine is always a sure bet.

 

 Here I decided to use carrots, yellow and green zucchini , smoked salmon and goat cheese. The vegetables were all cut with a mandoline, cooked till tender and cooled.

 As soon as you see your potatoes are cooked yet still firm, take them off the heat and run cold water over them so that they stop cooking.

 Line a long bread pan or terrine dish with Saran wrap, making sure the plastic wrap goes over the edges as you will need the extra plastic to apply pressure and seal the terrine. If you don't have any of these dishes, use any vessel which is long and somewhat deep.

 Always remember that the first ingredient you line your terrine with will be the first thing that will be seen once flipped and unmolded. Here I started with potato slices and then the yellow zucchini. Again, same as the potatoes, I cooked the sliced zucchini till semi firm and ran them under cold water so that it could retain it's shape.

 I then layered the smoked salmon and zucchini. As you can see from the picture , my zucchini slices were maybe a little too thin here, but hey, no one will notice this time as its in the middle and will be all compact.

 Another layer of potatoes , then cooked carrot strips.

 Then proceeded to slice 1/4 inch slices of goat cheese .

 For this dish I seasoned with salt and pepper. I chose not to over season with other spices and herbs as I knew I was making a basil sauce and wanted the flavor of the other ingredients to shine.

 To finish, l lined the sides of the cheese with potato till it came even with the cheese in height. (you can use any of the broken potato pieces here, nothing goes to waste)

 Once everything is layered , leaving a little space at the top, take your hand and slowely press down on the top, very gently. You will see little pockets of air come to the top. This is what you want to see . Keep repeating until you feel that all the air is out. Take the sides of the plastic wrap and fold over. Add more if you need to, don't be shy with it. Its need to be tight, you don't want air getting into it. Place a weight on the top and refrigerate. (in this case 8 hours- or longer if you desire)

 Here it is unmolded. As you can see it set quite nicely, tight and compact.

 A closer look.

Remember to make sure that every layer covers the next. I like to use the mandoline as it gives a more even look.

 Here is the first slice, end slice, plated in a basil sauce.

 

Terrines can look great because of the use of color. Putting the use of the smoked salmon and goat cheese out of the picture for a moment, this dish was cost effecient.

 

I used 5 medium new potatoes, 2 green zucchini, 2 yellow zucchini. I'm at 1.50 so far in cost. If I had of stuck with just vegetables, it would have cost  only 2.00 to make this. One dish can serve 12 clients quite easily. Many can be made ahead of time.

 

 Other vegetables could include:  roasted & peeled red/green/yellow/orange  peppers, or roasted portobello mushrooms, wilted spinach or wilted bok choy, roasted eggplant, etc.

 

Sauces are endless with a vegetable terrine.

 

I hope this info was useful. Any thoughts or comments are most welcome.

 

Petals.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #2 of 10

A great tutorial. Thanks.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
Reply
post #3 of 10

Something I really will try out soon, Petals. I think you're a little too modest when you call it easy and simple. Even if it's an improvisation, I'm convinced this needs a good feeling which elements go together well, how to slice all components equally well, how to build the whole terrine so it looks nice, how to cook the different ingredients -many times separately- and always to perfection, seasoning all elements separately... I really admire your knowledge and perfectionism.

 

Not all that long ago I was watching Masterchef The Professionals from Australia where Marco Pierre White is a judge. He made one of his star dishes, a leek and lobster terrine. The container he used was the same size as the one you used. Only... he puts 28 stalks of leek in there, not counting the lobster tails. At first it looks as an enormous heap of leek that will never get in the mold, but he uses heavy tiles to press it all together, also without using gelatine; http://www.masterchef.com.au/recipes/terrine-of-leek-and-lobster-with-a-water-vinaigrette.htm

 

Indeed a great tutorial! Thanks.

 

post #4 of 10

Zambomba Chris! That MP terrine is spectacular. I will replace lobster with shrimps and make my wife happy this weekend. Terrines. What a great idea petals.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
Reply
post #5 of 10

Petals, could you post the recipe for your basil sauce as well?

I admire people who have that creative sense,

who can just dream up dishes that are complicated,

yet approachable for a home cook.

 

I’m trying to think of a way that I could make a vegetable terrine,

But in a much smaller scale, say for only two people?

and still be able to slice a beautiful portion as you have here.

post #6 of 10
Thread Starter 

@ Chris: Thank you for your kind words. I really enjoyed that video you posted. I noticed that terrines are making somewhat of a comeback and chefs/cooks are taking this dish and are putting their own spin on it, which to me is a good thing, using classic technique.

 

@ Ordo: If ever you make it, I would love to see it .

 

@ Kgirl: Tomato season and canning is not yet ready (otherwise I would of made my own) so for that dish I used; garlic, onion, salt,  pepper, a dash of chili pepper, a hint of sugar,  tomato sauce, name brand Hunt's Tomato Sauce, and simply cooked it down.

Maybe you have a small pyrex dish ?. The depth of the mold I used was 12 inches long X 2 3/4 high.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #7 of 10

Thanks for posting!  I'm trying to wrap my head around this, to figure out how I can incorporate my flavors into such thin slices.  Your terrine looks beautiful, I'd take a slice!

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #8 of 10

Here's a terrine I did for the menu this week, it was heavily inspired by Michel Roux Jr. Pink and green salmon mousseline with a roulade of lemon sole, encased in spinach. Served with cucumber fennel dill salad and sauce rouille.

 

post #9 of 10
Thread Starter 
Stunning dish Sam and the techniques that went into making this are classic. I am a huge fan of the Roux family and their recipes.

Look forward to more of your dishes, inspiring.

Petals.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #10 of 10

By far the best post I've seen here yet. Pates and terrines are my favorite things to work on. Glad to see others are interested too. As soon as I catch up on some house cleaning I'll be breaking out the equipment and giving the next one a try. Thanks for the inspiration. 

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