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Need help choosing a Gyuto

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

Hi everyone !

Been a while since I've been following this website and finally it's time for me to buy my first knife. 

I am looking for a 240mm Stainless steel Gyuto. For a right hand user

I need a knife that will be most suitable for a prep cook

Budget is up to $300

 

If there is any more useful info I can give please let me know.

 

Thank you, 

A I Portnoy

post #2 of 15

Bump... same budget, same story

post #3 of 15

You might consider Konosuke HD. It's not stainless, but semi-stainless. If you dry it after work is done you won't have rust issues. It is not very reactive.

Also, are you willing to consider Powder metallurgy (PM) steels like ZDP-189, R2, SG, etc? They are pretty much stainless.

post #4 of 15
Thread Starter 

First, thank you for the reply.

Second, If the ZDP-189, R2, SG, etc are semi-stainless then sure I am open for suggestions. 

Not sure I like the Konosuke HD tho. Isn't it a laser ? I need a semi workhorse

post #5 of 15

Yoshihiro Molybdenum Gyuto is a nice knife for the money.  <$200 and it takes and hold a nice edge.  You didn't mention if you prefer a Wa or Yo style handle.  Ginsanko or "silver 3" might be a good alternative given your budget.  With the Yoshihiro you'd have money left over for stones.

post #6 of 15
Thread Starter 

I actually don't mind the type of handle nor do I can about esthetics

Mostly I care about edge retention, resistance to corrosion and blade geometry.

Btw would it matter if my budget will go up to $350?

post #7 of 15

There are a great many knives which satisfy your criteria for well under your budget; and $300 is probably way too much to spend on a student knife. 

 

But circumstances differ, and perhaps I'm reading too much into your CT "culinary student" self description.  Could you talk about how you plan to use and maintain the knife? 

 

BDL

post #8 of 15
Thread Starter 

I am a student who is about to graduate and I will be working in a hotel kitchen as a prep cook

Another reason I want a really good knife is the fact that I am in love with knives and my dream is to become a professional bladesmith so it wouldn't hurt to get a nice knife (Plus I rarely spend money on things and this is something that would give me great joy even if it is overpowered for a first timer prep cook) 

 

Edit: Not sure about how I will maintain it, but I did order a 1100 grit and a 5000 grit Japanese waterstones and I will also buy a honing rod to go with my knife

Ofc I will do anything it takes to keep my knife at top condition as knives are a hobby for me and I enjoy to spend time on them


Edited by A I Portnoy - 7/30/13 at 8:47am
post #9 of 15

I'd hesitate to bring a $300 dollar knife to work. Not that I don't trust anyone, but you never know.

post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by harlock0083 View Post

I'd hesitate to bring a $300 dollar knife to work. Not that I don't trust anyone, but you never know.
You just need to be sure that no one uses it, if you do. I find it hard to trust people with stuff they didn't buy, in general.
post #11 of 15
Thread Starter 

The knife is personal property. All you need to do is to inform people to never use your knife and if you are scary enough no one will touch it.

post #12 of 15

I never have a problem with anyone going near my knife at work. They give it a wide berth.  Maybe I am scary enough. laser.gif

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #13 of 15

Given your givens, your price range makes a lot of sense.  As a prospective knife maker, I'd like to steer you towards a semi-custom of some sort but there aren't many of those you can afford.  You might find some of the Richmonds interesting in that they've got a couple which are very "niche," but their Lamson made knives aren't without issues. 

 

ZDP-189, R2, and SG are not semi-stainless.  They're all stainless alloys of a class called "powdered metallurgicals"  (aka metallurgical powders aka PMs). There are some advantages and disadvantages to them. 

 

The Konosuke makes several different knives in HD.  All are lasers.  I believe the Kono HDs are the only semi-stainless wa-gyuto. 

 

There are a few really good carbon knives with decent stain-resistance within your price range; a few nice stainless knives as well, and a bunch of stainless cladded carbons.  While I hate cladded knives, it may well be the way to go for you.    

 

One of my favorite knives is a Richmond Ultimatum in 52100 carbon (the others are both Kono HD).  At 7oz it's definitely a workhorse, but may be on the heavy side for you.  The Ultimatum is also available in M390, which might be of interest in that it's the current darling of the PMs.  If you're serious about an Ultimatum, you'll have to make up your mind really fast.  They only stay in stock for a few days; it takes months for Richmond to restock; and I understand they have a batch coming in very soon.  

 

There are too many alternative to list.  It would help if you could narrow the field some by talking about what you want most; asking questions about particular concerns, or just talking some more about yourself. 

 

Before we get too carried away... where are located?

 

BDL

post #14 of 15
Thread Starter 

Thank you for the reply BDL. 

To help narrow things down: First,  I live in Israel. About what I want most: I am looking for a knife that will be good for cutting vegetables mostly. I'm really into the fine precise cuts but also needs to be with good edge retention. 

Thing is, for the duration cooking course I used a very cheap knife that was unable to push cut hard ingredients like onions and carrots, also had a problem of food sticking to the blade, being very hard and dangerous to remove.

So most important is that the knife is comfortable for many hours of pinch grip, to be able to cut things like tomatoes and onions without reactivity, durable enough to withstand the beating of push cutting, good grind to help food release (Or that's what I learn from videos I have been watching)

Hope that helps narrow things down a bit

 

Thanks again

post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by A I Portnoy View Post

First, thank you for the reply.

Second, If the ZDP-189, R2, SG, etc are semi-stainless then sure I am open for suggestions. 

Not sure I like the Konosuke HD tho. Isn't it a laser ? I need a semi workhorse.   I am looking for a knife that will be good for cutting vegetables mostly. I'm really into the fine precise cuts but also needs to be with good edge retention. 

The Konosuke HD is one of those rare knives that is both a laser and a workhorse. I intern as a prep cook once a week at a fine dining place and that's my primary knife. The weight, ability to take a very sharp edge and profile make it ideal for fine precise cuts that are demanded at the restaurant. I have a Zakuri blue #1 (carbon) as a backup for really tough work and I think I only used it a few times.

 

The Hono HD holds a very good edge. Food release is good, but I've found technique is as -or more- important than grind for food release. Onions, carrots and the like are no problem. Potatoes, a real test for food release have been less of problem after developing better technique. 

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