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How does your MBTI personality type come into play in the kitchen concerning managers, collegues, and subordinates?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 


How does your MBTI personality type come into play in the kitchen concerning managers, collegues, and subordinates?

 

http://www.vivocoaching.com/2011/11/28/what-is-the-mbti-myers-briggs-type-indicator/

 

 

I'm an INTJ personality type, and I'm finding it difficult to locate examples of other chefs and INTJ's kitchen environmental relationships and surroundings.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/INTJ

 

 

If by any chance you don't know what your personality type is, you can take this quiz here.

http://www.16personalities.com/free-personality-test

 

 

I'd like to know how accurate you think the results are concerning your personality, whether it be professional or personal.

 

I feel mine is eerily accurate in personal relationships as well as the workplace.

http://www.16personalities.com/intjs-at-work

 

eta

Also, has an employer ever asked you to take this test, or as an employer have tested a potential employee for the purpose of workplace compatibility or placement?


Edited by Pollopicu - 8/1/13 at 6:59am
“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

Reply
“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

Reply
post #2 of 17

Pretty interesting.  Never thought about personality types and our line of work.  According to this test (and how I'm feeling today) I'm an ENFJ, representing about 2% of the population. I think the results are very on point.  I'm very sensitive and want to please everybody, mostly dislike conflict, and love social situations. Here's what this site says about ENFJ managers.

 

 

ENFJ managers

  • Very charismatic
  • Pay a lot of attention to their subordinates’ needs
  • Great communicators
  • Able to easily inspire other people
  • Good at recognizing other people’s motives
  • May be manipulative in some situations

And no, I've never had to take a personality test for a job.  

post #3 of 17

Hm, ENTJ for me, have to cogitate on that for a while crazy.gif
 

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
post #4 of 17
Quote:

I'd like to know how accurate you think the results are concerning your personality, whether it be professional or personal.

 

PP, I just did this test and came out with an INTP disorder personality. I nearly fell off my chair when I read the personality description and all the rest. Never in my life have I seen such accurate result. Thanks for the link, this is real must-do test! Incredible.

 

I wonder if there are more INTP's around here?

post #5 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisBelgium View Post

PP, I just did this test and came out with an INTP disorder personality. I nearly fell off my chair when I read the personality description and all the rest. Never in my life have I seen such accurate result. Thanks for the link, this is real must-do test! Incredible.

 

I wonder if there are more INTP's around here?


I know, it's quite remarkable. There were some points I felt were a bit inaccurate for me, for example:

 

-Loathe manual work, especially where it can be automated

Not true for me, I actually enjoy doing things by hand, from scratch.

 

-More interested in strategy rather than tactical implementation

I usually present my ideas in a strategic manner during presentations since I tend to be self-conscience of my severely pedantic tendencies, however, when it's time to rock n roll and jot it all down on paper I plan the execution of my overall "strategy"  into a "tactical" plan, sometimes right down to the exact minute. I guess you could say that's where my "perfectionist" trait kicks in.

 

 

Everything else on the list is so on point it's not even funny. Especially the part of wanting to work alone, and preferring emails to phone calls. My old job didn't even have my tel. number, only my email because I didn't want to deal with phone calls on my days off, which is odd, because I could email about work on my days off for hours till the cows come home, I just don't want to hear voices on those days. Sometimes my own idiosyncrasies annoy and frustrate me. They also sometimes alienate me from possible meaningful business relationships.


Edited by Pollopicu - 8/1/13 at 6:56am
“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

Reply
“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

Reply
post #6 of 17

me --- I'm an ISFJ--- but I knew that from when I was a kid, just never put a label to it before ---

 

Some famous ISFJs:
St. Teresa of Avila
Queen Elizabeth II

post #7 of 17
I haven't had a chance to look at the websites or take the test as yet, but i will....what the hay?...coincidently after reading a thread here earlier this week( can't remember which one),I was thinking somewhat along these same lines..kinda, sorta...I was thinking how do personality traits affect cooking or vice versa..how some people have to control all aspects of cooking and sharing kitchen space and how some just seem to let it things flow very easy peasy etc. etc. etc....both get a great meal on the table, but definitely different strokes for different folks. i'm pretty sure after all these years of cooking that I don't need to take a test to tell me my 'cooking' personality,nor do I want to be pigeonholed into just one type...i think there is a lot of cross dressing to be done,but as i said...what the hay...it will be curious and delightful to see the changes. i do know that I am a detailed person but not a perfectionist or OCD or a control freak(I have other things that keep me awake at night). One of the many, many lessons that I have learned over years of cooking is that you always plan to do your absolute best but you can pretty much count on one hand the times that something doesn't change, morph or just happen for whatever reason so you need to learn to just lean into that and trust yourself and all your senses to run with it the best you possibly can....sometimes it's a good thing...sometimes even magic happens! Even more magical than planning it all down to the inth...I've done both. I guess how you handle all that may be personality driven or again vice versa.....also begging an answer is do people cook foods that suit their personality? how even recipes might be chosen...for example a perfectionist's personality will only make a dish they know they will hit the mark on every single time....every dish always being a success but never venturing out too too far or too too wide... an extroverted cook personality will cook without a safety net, almost 'driven' by the unknowing-ness of it all.... most interesting for sure......

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

Reply
post #8 of 17

I really do believe it's interesting to do the test, it spelled out things for me that I was well aware off but never saw it confirmed in writing. When I read the following paragraphs (amongst others) in my personality strengths and weaknesses, a bell starts ringing very loud;

 

(Strenghts)

Imaginative and original. An INTP’s mind is always working, always producing ideas regardless of whether they are likely to see the light of day. Not surprisingly, INTPs have no difficulties coming up with innovative, original solutions.

 

(Weaknesses)

Loathe rules and guidelines. INTPs need a lot of freedom and have little respect for rules and traditions which put artificial limits on their imagination. People with this personality type would rather have less security and more autonomy.

 

All I can say is this; yup, that's me! I knew that already but I never read anything like this before. I was in advertising for as long as I can remember and a vivid imagination is not a bad thing in that creative job that I truly loved. And I'm not an outspoken extravert at all.

post #9 of 17
Thread Starter 


I think it depends how you look at it too. I see taking the test as a form of self-improvement and self-awareness that could help you better understand your social surroundings, not only at work, but in your personal relationships well. (i.e. Spouse, friends, and children) Gee, it even described the type of mother I am to my son down to a T. That's pretty crazy.

There is a considerable amount of science backing up the affectiveness of MBTI, 70% of all fortune 500 companies utilize it with proven results.

How can a leader deny that having a better understanding of his/her team will be more affective for his/her business or company and improve productivity? I don't think it's about being pigeonholed into just one type, which if you choose to view it that way, sure it sounds negative, and who wants that? not me, I hate being classified into a "type", but I believe with the Myer Briggs test it's about understanding your traits and using that information to your advantage! whether it be at work or at home.


You should definitely take it Joey, I think it might surprise you. In a different sense it's like having your palm read.

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

Reply
“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

Reply
post #10 of 17
Yes PP, of course i am planning on doing the test..I wouldn't miss the opportunity,are you kidding? It's a good thing!......It will prove to be most interesting for sure as well as a good tool, which we can all benefit from having in our 'kit'.., Yes, having better understandings, communications and people skills is always a positive for me and it's always most interesting to learn new or surprising things about one's self along the way..it will however have to wait until after the weekend when I can give it my full attention...I am buried til fetal Monday.....btw, I used love getting my palm read!!!!!
joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

Reply

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

Reply
post #11 of 17
Did someone say palm readers?
Ever time we go to the Jersey Shore, to the boardwalk, I'd always search one out!
On our honeymoon, I had my palm read and she said you will marry soon... biggrin.gif
BAHAHAHA!
post #12 of 17

"Head Hunters"....or job placement companies (choose your moniker) have been using these tests for years to evaluate potential employees.

I myself have taken them.

You understand that they are used as an evaluation tool to help choose the right candidate for the position offered.

If a company is looking for an aggressive, no nonsense, type of person, for example, these tests are invaluable.

 

Did anyone taking the test notice how the same question is asked 3-4 times through out the questionnaire? 

The wording is changed in the sentences to "trick" you up. This, the experts say, is done to make sure your answers are the same in each attempt.

Anything less then that can cause red flags to appear in the evaluation.

 

They also tell you there are no "correct answers."  To this I say hogwash!!!

post #13 of 17

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chefross View Post

....Did anyone taking the test notice how the same question is asked 3-4 times through out the questionnaire? 

The wording is changed in the sentences to "trick" you up. This, the experts say, is done to make sure your answers are the same in each attempt.

Anything less then that can cause red flags to appear in the evaluation.

Chefross, I remember an explanation given about this repetitive questions thing in another test that had the same "trick" questions as you call it.

There's really much more behind it than people think. It's not so much about consistency. The examiners expect you to lie a few times because all people do. In a very competitive environment, this indicates how much candidates will do to get ahead of others (competitors, even colleagues!), let's call it testing their ruthlessness.

post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 

wow, how interesting.

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

Reply
“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

Reply
post #15 of 17
Thread Starter 

Some introvert comics.

 

introverts-comic.jpeg

 

comic-250x346.jpg

 

extrovert-introvert-comic-difference-between.jpg

 

Introvert_Dating.png

 

introvert20cartoon11.png

 

where can I order one?

introvert.jpg

 

tumblr_lyy62seDwl1qb5n3qo1_500.jpg

 

http://www.buzzfeed.com/erinlarosa/problems-only-introverts-will-understand


Edited by Pollopicu - 8/6/13 at 4:12pm
“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

Reply
“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

Reply
post #16 of 17

I've taken a few different test throughout the past few years and I always end up INFP or INTP...but I guess it makes sense if I look back at the times I took it. I think this is mostly accurate, especially the introvert part. I've always been the quiet kid that didnt talk a lot, unless I was around close friends or family.

post #17 of 17

I must have gone through the MBTI rubric 7 or 8 times by now.  I always come up INTP, and I think my personality helps me out quite a bit as a cook.  I'm not scared to improvise, and I can't stop taking recipes apart.

 

Whenever I go out to eat (which is rare these days) I tend to have a blast deconstructing my dish.

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