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kitchen scales to 0.01 grams

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 

Can anyone recommend a scale, for small amounts, that is accurate to 0.01 grams (0.1 grams may be good enough).  Thanks

post #2 of 21

now this is going to be kinda funny.

I bought a digital scale which usually is used to weigh chemical stuff.  

if your drugstore does weigh out things, ask them......since I am in netherlands its hard to recommend a brand....

usually you should be able to find them with not too much effort. sorry that I can't be of more help.

have a look at online stores that sell stuff to people who make their own cosmetic / bodycare products, might be of help.

post #3 of 21

Have you tried an internet search?

 

You are probably looking at a hooded scale as moving air can create errors greater than 0.01g, remember, 0.01g is the same as 0.00035 ounces.
 

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post #4 of 21

Having 3+ years of college chemisty coursework that dates to the early 70's and 80's, you do NOT need three decimal places of accuracy.  Recently I got an OXO scale that measures in grams and ounces and it works quite well for me when it comes to measuring out flour, butter and water.  And I've tested this scale against my standard weights for my 1970's triple beam (for beer and wine making) that measures from 0.10 to 275 grams and the OXO scale is right-on.


Edited by kokopuffs - 8/3/13 at 7:06pm

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #5 of 21
Thread Starter 

thanks Kokopuffs.  I have an Oxo scale too which I really like down to about 5 g, which serves most purposes.  I've played around with weights in the range of 1 g and I find the reproducibility not so good, which is why I want one with better resolution, since  few things I weigh require somewhere between 0.5 and 5 grams.
 

post #6 of 21

mamelok, checkout this page at amazon.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #7 of 21
Thread Starter 

Thanks Kokopuffs. Very helpful
 

post #8 of 21

Also get yourself a set of standard weights for testing the calibration of the scale.  They are a definite must.  Once I purchased a brand new Ohaus triple beam scale whose measurements were way out of line - thanks to the use of standard weights for testing its calibration.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #9 of 21

And you're probably looking at what's called a jeweler's scale.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #10 of 21

If you really want one that sensitive (and that expensive) go with a Denver Instruments.  Mine is sensitive enough it will read the heat waves off my hand.  I guarantee you'd have the only one in town.

 

Any reloading scale will weigh to .1 Grain, by the way.  Way less than .1 Gram

post #11 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raibeaux View Post

...Any reloading scale will weigh to .1 Grain, by the way.  Way less than .1 Gram

1 grain = 64.79891 milligrams = 0.06479891g

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post #12 of 21

BTW I own a double pan balance that will measure 1/10000th of a gram (1/10th of a milligram).  It was probably used in measuring Uranium 235 at the TVA during the Manhattan project.  Totally useless in the kitchen!   eek.giflaser.gifpeace.gif

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #13 of 21
Chef,
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post #14 of 21

My scale is totally mechanical and was made during the thirties; it's almost a work of art.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #15 of 21

1 gram = 15.4323584 grains or 64.79891_milligrams

15.4323584 grains = 1 gram

1 gr = mg * 0.015432
 
What we need is a scale that measures to .0001 of a yoctogram
 
Then we could make cupcakes for an electron.
 
Must be past my bedtime.
post #16 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by kokopuffs View Post

Having 3+ years of college chemisty coursework that dates to the early 70's and 80's, you do NOT need three decimal places of accuracy.  Recently I got an OXO scale that measures in grams and ounces and it works quite well for me when it comes to measuring out flour, butter and water.  And I've tested this scale against my standard weights for my 1970's triple beam (for beer and wine making) that measures from 0.10 to 275 grams and the OXO scale is right-on.

 

The chemistry TA in me died a little bit..... crying.gif

post #17 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raibeaux View Post

1 gram = 15.4323584 grains or 64.79891_milligrams

15.4323584 grains = 1 gram

1 gr = mg * 0.015432
 
What we need is a scale that measures to .0001 of a yoctogram
 
Then we could make cupcakes for an electron.
 
Must be past my bedtime.


I'm THE resident galaxy cruiser, here, and 1 gram = 1000 milligrams or approximately 1 stale yoctogram.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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post #18 of 21

I only use scales this accurate when loading things that ignite and propel a projectile.

 

7000 grains = one pound.   Yep they are small...

 

Lowest charge that I use is 1.5 grains of Clays (Hodgdon) in a 32 ACP cartridge with a 71 grain projectile... the maximum for that cartridge, projectile and powder is 1.7 grains.

So  you better be damn sure your scale is accurate or else things can go KaBooM! in your face.

 

---------

 

As for the kitchen... 1 gram (not grain) is just fine.   The only time you might need smaller is if you are playing molecular-gastronomy on a budget and making very small batches when testing things.

Which in all honesty doesn't work very well as the 'variables' and 'unknowns' start to become larger factors than the measured ingredients.

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #19 of 21

Powder up or powder down?  Looks like a tenth would really make a difference. 

post #20 of 21
Yes, especially when it comes to gunpowder where tenths of a grain can really make a differency in both accuracy and personal safety.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #21 of 21

Hello,
Well you can easily find in internet a scale with 0.01 grams precision or even more, but usually they are very expensive . As more precision you want in scale higher goes the price. 

If 0,1 grams is enough go for that so you can save money.  I have a friend that have used this one http://www.amazon.co.uk/Precision-Electronic-Pocket-Digital-Scales/dp/B0041S4WII . It's not the best, but it's very cheap ;) 

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