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When is a "cup" not a "cup"?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

With members from around the world, we sometimes forget, or maybe didn't know, that a "cup" in one area does not necessarily mean a "cup" in another area.

 

Having done a little research, by no means exhaustive, I've developed a table that helps me translate recipes from different sources.

 

Some may find it useful.

 

Multiply amount of Column A by desired new measurement
Cups Millilitres USC USL Intl CC Imp JPN JGO
USC 236.59 1.000 0.986 0.946 1.577 0.833 1.183 1.314
USL 240.00 1.014 1.000 0.960 1.600 0.845 1.200 1.333
Intl 250.00 1.057 1.042 1.000 1.667 0.880 1.250 1.389
CC 150.00 0.634 0.625 0.600 1.000 0.528 0.750 0.833
Imp 284.00 1.200 1.183 1.136 1.893 1.000 1.420 1.578
JPN 200.00 0.845 0.833 0.800 1.333 0.704 1.000 1.111
JGO 180.00 0.761 0.750 0.720 1.200 0.634 0.900 1.000
                 
Tbsp Milliliters USC Intl Aust        
USC 14.79 1.000 0.986 0.739        
INTL 15.00 1.014 1.000 0.750        
Aust 20.00 1.353 1.333 1.000        
                 
tsp Milliliters USC Intl Aust        
USC 4.93 1.000 0.986 0.986        
Intl 5.00 1.014 1.000 1.000        
Aust 5.00 1.014 1.000 1.000        
                 
USC = U.S. Customary (standard kitchen measuring cup)
USL = U.S. Legal (nutritional label)
Intl = International (Commonwealth, Europe, Australia)
CC = Coffee Cup
Imp = Imperial, old UK system
JPN = Japanese
JGO = Japanese Go cup, used for rice

 

If anyone has additional or conflicting information, please post.

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post #2 of 17

Woah, thanks for your time pete. I hope I can stick to grams though, I'm going cross-eyed with all those numbers!

post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 

Agreed!

Quote:
Originally Posted by StuartScholes View Post

Woah, thanks for your time pete. I hope I can stick to grams though, I'm going cross-eyed with all those numbers!

Unfortunately, there are a multitude of recipes floating around with volume measurements instead of weights.

 

To further compound the issue, there are many food ingredients that do not have a one to one correspondence between volume and weight, especially flours and other powders as well as agricultural products such as fruits and vegetables which have a range of weights for a specific size designation. A prime example is eggs, each country seems to have different standards for what constitutes a large egg, or any other size for that matter.

 

In the USA, a large egg has a MINIMUM weight of 50g, but can weigh as much as 56g, a 12% span.

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post #4 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeteMcCracken View Post

 

 

In the USA, a large egg has a MINIMUM weight of 50g, but can weigh as much as 56g, a 12% span.

 

... I was just thinking along this line this morning as I made brunch.

I had two different brands if you will of eggs

 

both with the exact same nutritional information on the carton, based on a 50g egg...

here's the thing, I got out my digital scale weighed each one... the range was from 52g (Sprouts brand) to 61g (from Walmart)

so when my DH asks me how many calories are on my plate, the standard answer of 70 calories is not correct, not one of those eggs were 50grams.

 

I thought that maybe my 'OCD by association' had been peeking out

when I looked at the eggs from Sprouts, being that it was so much smaller, I wasn't that far off base...

So with this said, wouldn't this affect my baking recipe? 

when adding liquids, ie milk, water, etc., shouldn't I be making adjustments based upon the eggs weight rather than 'size'? 

post #5 of 17

Just to make it even more dificult - egg white is around 50 cals per 100g, but yolk is around 320 cals per 100g. Are the yolks the same size? Is there more white? You're really not helping my cross-eyed......ness.

post #6 of 17
Thread Starter 

Too many years ago to remember, I found a recipe for Tempura batter that read:

  • 1 egg
  • 2 egg shells of water
  • 3 egg shells of flour

 

Now THAT makes sense wink.gif

 

At least in the USA, eggs are graded by the average weight per dozen, not the individual egg. And there is no penalty for over weight, only under weight.

 

Technically, weight is the best way to go. Practically, it doesn't make a significant difference in home cooking and, if the batch is large enough, everything averages out.

Chef,
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post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaneohegirlinaz View Post

 

... I was just thinking along this line this morning as I made brunch.

I had two different brands if you will of eggs

 

both with the exact same nutritional information on the carton, based on a 50g egg...

here's the thing, I got out my digital scale weighed each one... the range was from 52g (Sprouts brand) to 61g (from Walmart)

so when my DH asks me how many calories are on my plate, the standard answer of 70 calories is not correct, not one of those eggs were 50grams.

 

I thought that maybe my 'OCD by association' had been peeking out

when I looked at the eggs from Sprouts, being that it was so much smaller, I wasn't that far off base...

So with this said, wouldn't this affect my baking recipe? 

when adding liquids, ie milk, water, etc., shouldn't I be making adjustments based upon the eggs weight rather than 'size'? 

This now begs the question, what is meant by 'large' egg versus 'extra large' egg???

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeteMcCracken View Post

Too many years ago to remember, I found a recipe for Tempura batter that read:

  • 1 egg
  • 2 egg shells of water
  • 3 egg shells of flour

 

Now THAT makes sense wink.gif

 

 

 

... that's how I learn to make it ... chef.gif

post #9 of 17
Thread Starter 

In the USA, the minimum average weight per dozen is:

  • Small > 38g
  • Medium > 44g
  • Large > 50g
  • Extra Large > 56g
  • Jumbo > 63g

 

FWIW, eggs all have 1.43Kcal/g of energy

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post #10 of 17

>>minimum average weight per dozen is:

 

I rather suspect there's a mishap there, would be grams per egg, not per dozen.

 

regardless, does not agree with:

 

http://www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/getfile?dDocName=STELDEV3004376

post #11 of 17
Thread Starter 

My error, in both cases

 

Minimum average per egg weight, net of shell for previous post

 

Second error, egg weights, mistakenly, reported less shell weight, mixed up nutrition tables and egg standards, my apologies.

 

Illustrative works to demonstrate variability and the USDA reference only holds for USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and the European Union have different standards

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dillbert View Post

>>minimum average weight per dozen is:

 

I rather suspect there's a mishap there, would be grams per egg, not per dozen.

 

regardless, does not agree with:

 

http://www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/getfile?dDocName=STELDEV3004376

From the publication cited:

 

Size or weight class ...Minimum net weight per dozen (ounces)

Jumbo ............................. 30 ounces (2.50 ounces/egg or 71g/egg (actually 70.87375g))
Extra large ...................... 27 ounces (2.25 ounces/egg or 64g/egg (actually 63.786375g))
Large .............................. 24 ounces (2.00 ounces/egg or 57g (actually 56.699g))
Medium .......................... 21 ounces (1.75 ounces/egg or 50g (actually 49.611625g))
Small ..............................18 ounces (1.50 ounces/egg or 43g (actually 42.52425g)
Peewee ........................... 15 ounces (1.25 ounces/egg or 35g (actually 35.436875g)

 

My apologies for the notational error as well as the incorrect egg weights.

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post #12 of 17
This leaflet from the UK's NFU explains how UK eggs are prduced

http://www.nfuonline.com/assets/4257
post #13 of 17

the weight per dozen is of course a curious twist.

 

there is somewhere deeply buried and-I'm-not-going-looking-for-it-(again) a USDA thing about how much each individual egg can vary from the "average" for its class. 

 

why?  seems one can't put up a bunch of jumbos and include some peewees in a carton and call them "large" simply because the sum total of all 12 eggs fits the definition.....

 

another thing some of the global population is needing to absorb is the 'new' EU definitions:

 

four official sizes of eggs -
very large (73g and over)
large (63-73g)
medium (53-63g)
small (under 53g)

 

not work'a so gut with USDA word definitions....

post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeteMcCracken View Post

Too many years ago to remember, I found a recipe for Tempura batter that read:

  • 1 egg
  • 2 egg shells of water
  • 3 egg shells of flour

 

Now THAT makes sense wink.gif

 

FIFY -

 

That is F*ing Brilliant!  

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #15 of 17

Pete, Thank you. This is the second time in the last couple of weeks your calculations have made my head spin. The other was your response to a question about comparing cake pan sizes when the shapes were different, I believe. 

post #16 of 17
Thread Starter 

Drat!

 

I left off five other measurements that are smaller than a U.S. Customary teaspoon:

  • Tad = 1/4 teaspoon (1.2325mL)
  • Dash = 1/8 teaspoon  (0.61625mL)
  • Pinch = 1/16 teaspoon (0.308125mL)
  • Smidgen = 1/32 teaspoon (0.1540625mL)
  • Drop = 1/64 teaspoon (0.07703125mL)

 

If you want a set of measuring spoons for these, take a look at: http://www.preparedpantry.com/mini-measuring-spoons.aspx

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #17 of 17
Great info.....
Edited by john g - 8/7/13 at 1:04am
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