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Advanced technique - dessert in a meringue shell

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

I am working on a new dessert and there is a technique I have been wanting to use for a while, but have found very little information online about it. 

It basically consists of a hollow, dry meringue shell that is filled to order with dessert components.  Here is a link to an example- "Lighter than air Mont Blanc"

 

So far, I have been able to get the shell that thin, but am having trouble with the appearance.  I have tried both piping and scooping the meringue, but the exterior is never quite smooth enough. Does anyone have experience with this or know of a source with more information??  

post #2 of 11

Can't help you out, but wow, way cool dessert.  surprised.gif  Let us know what you find out because I am definitely intrigued.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #3 of 11
Is the filling dipped into the meringue then cooked like a baked Alaska? That's the only way I could figure it. Otherwise some sort of mold would be dipped into the meringue but removing said mold would be problematic.
Fluctuat nec mergitur
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Fluctuat nec mergitur
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post #4 of 11
Thread Starter 

No, the filling is ice cream and I have seen another done with fresh fruit and whipped cream like a vacherin.

post #5 of 11

It looks very similar in shape/size to the hollow chocolate ball filled with fruit later on in the blog.

 

In the first photo, there looks like a barely perceptible "seam" just where the beak forms, but it could also be the lighting casting shadows.  Maybe there's a japanese pastry tool or culinary tool that they are using to form the shells with.  What about asking the restaurant directly for some help?
 

post #6 of 11

This is totally a guess but IMO the ice cream/innards are frozen with liq nitrogen, meringue piped from above to encase it, and it is baked like a Baked Alaska. As the ice cream melts it will begin to dissolve the meringue from the inside out leaving an outer shell. Again.. speculation.

post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thank you for everyone's input.

post #8 of 11
I think Laurenlulu hit the nail on the head there, or the meringue in this case.
Fluctuat nec mergitur
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Fluctuat nec mergitur
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post #9 of 11

I agree, very plausible, good on you Lauren !

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
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Wine and Cheese
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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post #10 of 11

Thank you, thank you, although I still may be entirely incorrect. :)  It is just what I would try first if I were trying to recreate that beauty.

post #11 of 11
Well, I was lucky enough to be taken to dinner in the Aqua Shard restaurant on Saturday and they had just such a meringue - and I am desperate to re create it! Can't imagine how one gets the smooth finish but it looked deffinite to me that the clever Shard chef had used a mould. It was far too symmetrical and smooth to have been anything else. Where do we go from here?
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