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Kitchen Code Code of Honor ?

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 

Ok so i have found out in good ways that im learning abiout the offical Kitchen Code atleast for the 3 restourants my company i work for has down here in boca 

 

so far i have learned that 

 

never ever sell out another Kitchen Team Member 

if someone asks you who did what  if something was bad just say i got it ill be on it 

or if someone tells you to do something and says the wrong thing never say that person told you just say yes and ill take care of it 

also i have learned that the chef's never try to steal away an employee from one restourant to another 

and will only hire at another restourant if its a different shift or wants to move to a different area but never try to steal someone away 

 

but still learning on more 

i did a search on kitchen code and all that came up with  heath stuff and color coding 

i am trying to learn as much as i can 

 

so can some of you list a few things here i figured maybe 

 

we can get a list of kitchen code going on 

if there is something specific in your kitchen or if its all Universal for any kitchen 

 

thanks 

 

 

also perhaps  kitchen slang also 

 

this way i can understand a bit better what is being said when its said 

 

i screwed up yesterday and didn't understand what the chef asked for he used a slang of some sort that i was the only one who didn't understand so looking to get some help here from you all 

if possible 

 

thank you 

post #2 of 22

FNG? rolleyes.gif

post #3 of 22
Thread Starter 

i thought FNG was  a Military term hm guess multiple uses lol 

post #4 of 22

If you are a culinary student and want to have a career in food service, I would think that one of the first things you should have learned is how to spell RESTAURANT.

post #5 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thumper1279 View Post

dude  please don't fucking joke about my spelling i am asking you nicely 

i have a issue with spelling no not dyslexia i have a issue with spelling not reading well i have dyslexia also 

but my issue with spelling is 

i have trouble remembering how to spell things and i have trouble spelling the same things twice the same way sometimes 

 

Some points that I try to incorporate into my professional code:

1.) refrain from using language which some people might find offensive

2.) not to get defensive in my interactions with other people and take ribbing in stride

3.) be cognizant of the fact that my signature and attention to detail show in everything I do whether it be spelling or replicating a dish and or recipe, consistency is of paramount importance

4.) good enough, never is

5.) remember that this too shall pass

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #6 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefbuba View Post

If you are a culinary student and want to have a career in food service, I would think that one of the first things you should have learned is how to spell RESTAURANT.

 

don't make fun of my spelling please dude   maybe back in your day spelling was everything because there where never any disabilitys or atleast they never labled anyone with issues in the 50s or when ever 

but no seriously 

dude i have problems with spelling 

and im not makeing any excuses im just useing who i am not changing for anyone els if people don't like me then they don't have to deal with me just have to get along with me 

 

you don't have to like who you work with you have to get along with who you work with 

 

i look at that in all aspects of life 

post #7 of 22

WOW. 

post #8 of 22

...fng...come on man

post #9 of 22

What do you mean never sell out another team member?  If someone is doing something obviously wrong or unethical then it needs to change.

post #10 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thumper1279 View Post

 

don't make fun of my spelling please dude   maybe back in your day spelling was everything because there where never any disabilitys or atleast they never labled anyone with issues in the 50s or when ever 

but no seriously 

dude i have problems with spelling 

and im not makeing any excuses im just useing who i am not changing for anyone els if people don't like me then they don't have to deal with me just have to get along with me 

 

you don't have to like who you work with you have to get along with who you work with 

 

i look at that in all aspects of life 

With this attitude you are going to have a long, stressful and bumpy career sir. Part of becoming a good cook is being able to accept your mistakes and learn from them. If you have a problem spelling then fix it. Etc. Are you going to make the same excuses if your sauce break's? Or a piece of fish is overcooked? Come on .. think about it. 

post #11 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Denaliranger1 View Post

With this attitude you are going to have a long, stressful and bumpy career sir. Part of becoming a good cook is being able to accept your mistakes and learn from them. If you have a problem spelling then fix it. Etc. Are you going to make the same excuses if your sauce break's? Or a piece of fish is overcooked? Come on .. think about it. 

 

I'm not one to be offended easily, so this is something I find really cruel, insensitive and just plain mean.  You telling him to 'fix' his disability is like me telling you to change your eye color and then telling you that you can't roast a chicken because your eyes are blue. Owning up to an overcooked fish is entirely different than having a learning disability.  Get a clue and don't be a p****.

 

Maybe you should be doing some research on the "Code of Honor" yourself.

post #12 of 22
Lets all be more respectful here and stick to the topic. Keep your opinions regarding spelling and grammar to yourselves, please.
Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!
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Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!
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post #13 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Denaliranger1 View Post

With this attitude you are going to have a long, stressful and bumpy career sir. Part of becoming a good cook is being able to accept your mistakes and learn from them. If you have a problem spelling then fix it. Etc. Are you going to make the same excuses if your sauce break's? Or a piece of fish is overcooked? Come on .. think about it. 

deleted by myself 


Edited by Thumper1279 - 8/11/13 at 8:16pm
post #14 of 22

Everyone has squandered a great opportunity to talk about a very good topic. Kitchens do have codes and language, which I've heard many times compared to the military. Some principles and jargon vary from kitchen to kitchen, but for the most part, there are many general principles that ALL decent kitchens and experienced cooks abide by.

 

Throwing someone under the bus. Yeah, don't do it. Don't immediately tell a chef or sous that so-and-so said something was ok if that chef or sous is blowing up in your face. Just take responsibility for it, fix the problem, move on, and don't repeat the mistake. If they specifically say, "I want to know who", then I'd say bow your head, and be honest; I'd advise against lying. Sometimes the chef just wants to know. At the least, your crew will think you're honest and know your place. And honesty is contagious. It sounds unfair, or backward, but you end up having to take blame for things that you don't do, especially in the beginning. But it's also good to have an attitude of taking responsibility and being accountable for everything going on in a kitchen (even for things that are outside your station or normal duties).

 

There's a fine line, though. It's important to take care of your own station and duties and stay out of situations where you might throw someone under the bus or get thrown under yourself. You gain only resentment from hard-working fellow cooks if you rat someone out. And chefs are all former cooks who hated being thrown under the bus themselves. And it's all happened to us. So being that guy, or girl, who's always trying to be the chef's pet, will win you no favor with your fellow cooks and very little favor with the boss.

 

A lot of the time, though, being 'thrown' consists of something really petty, like how to wash lettuces, or store mise-en-place, or cool or cook something. Cooks are always bickering over technique details. But if you're 'outed' about forgetting to put something away, or messing something up, or spilling clarified butter all over the walk-in, you can't run away from it. You've got to own up to mistakes, and NOT repeat them.

 

The reason you don't do it is so as to be respected by your coworkers, which is, a lot of the time, more important than being favored by the chef. But if someone left your station a mess, or made nothing on the prep list in the morning and you're scrambling and struggling to make up for someone else's laziness, and going to this person yourself is not improving the situation; then you should tell a sous or the chef, hopefully privately, that you want to do your job but are having to pick up after someone else's slack.  

post #15 of 22

"That's not my job" is not a phrase that should exist in kitchens, or restaurants for that matter. If you come across someone who uses the phrase often, stay away from them. Learn to work with him or her, but don't let yourself be influenced.

 

There are lots of ****** tasks in kitchens and you have to always be willing to do them without complaint. Need to pull out the stove and clean behind it? you got it. Speedracks need detailing? you got it. 150 parmesan baskets? you go it. clean five case of kale in this tiny sink? you got it. Carry the grease dump pot to the nasty garbage room in the sub-basement to dump it in the barrel? you got it.

 

As a cook, no job should be below you. 

post #16 of 22

I generally agree with 3/8ths, but perhaps my idea of "throwing under the bus" is different.  Sure, I would have never tattled on someone to my chef because of something they did or didn't do (within reason).  But I do think its important to call colleagues out face to face if they are doing they are not supposed to. Some people would say thats throwing someone under.  

 

Yes, you take the blame for something even if it wasnt you....once, maybe twice, then its up to you to make sure YOU aren't the one taking the blame for someone else's mistakes.

 

Other code of conduct include things that are already ingrained in most of us.  You take the last of something?  Get that container washed and refill it.  Set your partner up as much as you can and hopefully they'll do the same.  Clean it if you used it.  Don't sandbag.  Trying to pass off old product is a horrible offense.  Bottom line each kitchen has its own way of doing things.  Adjust to that. Don't ever come into a kitchen saying, "well this is how I did it at my last job."  No one cares.  House rules apply. Have a new way to roll out pasta?  Suggest it after you've made the pasta their way 10 times.

post #17 of 22

I don't disagree with anything cacioepepe said. One thing about working within a team is learning to face your coworkers when something is amiss. I failed to mention that, and also the issue of house rules. It's true, they always apply.

post #18 of 22

kitchen code??

 

havent heard much of the stuff you listed (i.e. chefs stealing employees happens, ALL THE TIME). the industry is highly incestuous, which is kinda why, they should of taught you about 'networking' yourself in school. networking is good.

in this industry loyalty aint always a good thing. every kitchen is different. different equipment, recipes, layout, etc. when i look at an app, i look for experience first and fore most. unless youve worked 20 different places within a 2 yr period, you should be considered. especially with a scholastic background.

 

i agree with the aforementioned replies on, "its not my job".

thats s***.

sweat along everyone else and you will gain the respect you want. you dont know how to do it, or dont understand the lingo...dont be afraid to ask..it will only make you better in the end.

 

good luck to ya man.

post #19 of 22

As a manager, I always make it my priority to learn every station and every recipe at a place I work in. I have no problems jumping on any part of the line, or helping out with prep, or washing dishes, or organizing the cooler, or any other job. My attitude is always can-do, and everyone who works for and with me should feel the same way. You have to have pride in your kitchen, pride in your work, pride in what you do. No one should ever say "that's not my job" because everything in the kitchen is everyone's job. I have never acted that way, and wouldn't want to employ someone that did. If your chef asks you to do something or fix something, you do it. If you feel like you're getting blamed for something you didn't do, you can clarify that you didn't commit the offense, but still take initiative to fix the problem.

 

One thing I would say that I find to be a common problem with cooks, is when you ask "how long" tell them to re-make something, they get defensive, want to see the ticket, say they did it right. It doesn't matter. When I'm on expo and I ask you for something, you give it to me. The customer's satisfaction with the meal is the first priority, and I don't care if you think the burger you sent out was a perfect medium, cook it more if they want it more well done.
 

post #20 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Denaliranger1 View Post

With this attitude you are going to have a long, stressful and bumpy career sir. Part of becoming a good cook is being able to accept your mistakes and learn from them. If you have a problem spelling then fix it. Etc. Are you going to make the same excuses if your sauce break's? Or a piece of fish is overcooked? Come on .. think about it. 

if i screw something up on the job or if i make a mistake  i don't make excuses 

i think thats why i am still here after 3 weeks in my first kitchen ever 

and a brand new one not just fine dining but a luxury first class kitchen 

im still there after 3 weeks that says soemthing right ? 

maybe that i do what i am there for and if i mess up i own up and fix it if i have trouble fixing it i ask for help 

 

there is a difference between having a disability and just being a duchbag lol 

post #21 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by threeeighths View Post

"That's not my job" is not a phrase that should exist in kitchens, or restaurants for that matter. If you come across someone who uses the phrase often, stay away from them. Learn to work with him or her, but don't let yourself be influenced.

 

There are lots of ****** tasks in kitchens and you have to always be willing to do them without complaint. Need to pull out the stove and clean behind it? you got it. Speedracks need detailing? you got it. 150 parmesan baskets? you go it. clean five case of kale in this tiny sink? you got it. Carry the grease dump pot to the nasty garbage room in the sub-basement to dump it in the barrel? you got it.

 

As a cook, no job should be below you. 

this is exactly how i feel and i work this is 

what if i am asked to work or told to get into the dish pit for the evening i will if im told to jump to Gardmenge or yo Ross  get on the front line in the half back hell yeah im there but thaat doesn't mean im going to take less pride in being told to take dish pit then front half back line  

 

we all work together in the kitchen 


I am a bit of a fatty i  admit so i have trouble getting in behind the stoves and the flat top to get the walls behind there even when pulling them out its not easy for me to get behind there so first thing 

i pull the stoves out i clean them front side to side top to bottom  if i can't get behind after i clean what i can i go find help to get the rest did that just last night 

 

yeah sure the floors are the dish  responsibly to clean up but i don't like my floors dirty so they are my reasponsability also 

post #22 of 22

@Thumper...each time you post I am more impressed.

The rest of the Global Workforce (well at least half lol) could take a lesson from your book and make it their own.

As you move thru life there will be temptations with rewards so appealing you are tempted to stray.

Will you be strong enough to resist each and every one?

Probably not.

I do have a hunch that the post temptation guilt will be enough to jerk you back in line, lol.

 

mimi

 

* I have a feeling that a lot of what you believe has been instilled during your childhood, as it usually is.

 

If at all possible, thank them for me smiles.gif

 

m.

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