or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Recipes › Pastry cream
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Pastry cream

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

Looking for a pastry cream that doesn't taste like the flour blended in, and will stand up for a dessert filling.

post #2 of 17

Um, perhaps you are not cooking the pastry cream long enough if it still tastes of flour.

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
post #3 of 17

+1

 

Get beating!

post #4 of 17

Don't use flour use starch

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #5 of 17

Don't use flour  use starch, milk, egg. sugar, touch vanilla

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #6 of 17

cornflour/cornstarch

post #7 of 17
Thread Starter 

I am going to try the cornstarch....also how do you feel about folding in whipped cream for a stable but fluffier texture

post #8 of 17

If you did that it would not longer be called pastry cream.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #9 of 17

When you fold whipped cream/ creme chantilly its becomes creme diplomat- used in cream cakes ect..... 

post #10 of 17
I also know it as Chiboust .

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #11 of 17
delete delete delete
Edited by kokopuffs - 8/17/13 at 3:09pm

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #12 of 17

@Petals-  Thanks, that's why i love this job, learn something new everyday :)

 

Sure i may have made this at college many moons ago,

 

Crème Chiboust is a crème pâtissière (pastry cream) lightened with stiffly beaten egg whites. Though occasionally using whipped cream to lighten this is traditionally a millefeuille cream.

Crème Chiboust can be flavoured with vanillaorange zest, or liqueurs. Mixed with fruit, it becomes crème plombières.

post #13 of 17
Thread Starter 

What would it be?   I tried it and it tasted great, held up very well.

post #14 of 17

I use to use 3/4 whipped cream  1/4 stiff egg whites

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #15 of 17
Thread Starter 

So forgive me for asking a sill question....So you beat the egg whites for first then  add to the egg based pastry cream? Could I also add some beaten whipped cream to this? Does the  stiffened egg white  help to stabilize the mixture and how long will this hold?

 

Thanks to all for sharing!

post #16 of 17

Sidediva,

 

 

Here is a video of Bruno  ( he is a bit of a show man for the way he talks ) making a pastry cream . The recipe is at the start of the video.

 

Now he left his vanilla skins in the custard, you can take them out or follow his recipe, its up to you, I usually take them out.

 

You should have no problem with your pastry cream holding up.

 

http://youtu.be/sn5d41JMFFg

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #17 of 17
Thread Starter 
Great video...thank you so much!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Recipes
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Recipes › Pastry cream