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post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

What am i doing wrong... I put all the ingr. in pot turn to low on my stove and the rec. says simmer 2 to 6 hours on simmer. Well its been 2 hours and still no simmer. What are u suppose to do ....never ever did stock before. Help.   If i move heat up to medium low still nothing but at medium or medium high starting to show simmer. But dir. said keep on low,well where i am is not low. Any help please.

post #2 of 6

You have to bring the stock up to a boil first and then reduce the heat to medium low or whichever setting keeps it at a simmer. Water boils at about 100 degrees c and will not reach that heat quick on just low.

No stovetop is the same so you need to use your best visual judgement.

Gourmandise is an impassioned, rational and habitual preference for all objects that flatter the sense of taste.
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Gourmandise is an impassioned, rational and habitual preference for all objects that flatter the sense of taste.
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post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 

but the rec. does not want you to boil first. so how would you do this. yes i  agree usually do a boil first than down to a simmer. But like i said doesnt want u to boil first. Help ! So do i keep it at the medium heat or in this case medium high heat to simmer.   I am doing the visual but again not at low heat i am using medium heat , is this normal. Please explain new to making stock and cooking.

post #4 of 6

You just have to adjust the heat until it produces a simmer. Simple as that. The liquid needs a higher temperature so you must turn up the heat.

Gourmandise is an impassioned, rational and habitual preference for all objects that flatter the sense of taste.
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Gourmandise is an impassioned, rational and habitual preference for all objects that flatter the sense of taste.
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post #5 of 6

It has to come to a boil first, or just below a boil, then reduce to a simmer.

What type of stock are you making that asks for six hrs of cook time?

Most simple stocks do not benefit from long cook times.

Boiling vs simmering

post #6 of 6

Depending on how you were taught or whom you respect the most, simmering is cooking in a flavorful liquid at a temperature between 180°F and 200°F (82°C-93°C). How you get there is subject to differing viewpoints.

 

If starting with a liquid at room temperature, it is obvious that a considerable amount of heat will be required to bring the temperature up to simmering. This can be done rapidly with high heat or extremely slowly with low heat or somewhere in between.

 

Many find it easier to bring the liquid to a boil because it is easy to visually detect, then lower the heat input until the liquid barely quivers with a few small bubbles breaking the surface.

 

Others, who have thermometers, prefer to bring the temperature up to, say 185°F (85°C) without ever reaching the boiling point. Some advocate a very slow temperature rise, say an hour to reach the target, others advocate a more rapid rise, say on high with watchful care.

 

Is there only one way? Absolutely not, it depends on what you are attempting to achieve and how you wish to achieve it.

 

Personally, I prefer to never let my stocks boil as my experience demonstrates a clearer resulting stock. That works for me, it may differ with you.
 

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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