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Sharpening cheap kitchen knives

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

Hello there

 

For some unknown reasons I've found myself reading kitchen forums and article reviews quite a lot lately. And I badly want to buy some really good kitchen gyuto, but apparently my sharpening skills are near zero level, so I decided to learn to sharpen first and get knife afterwards.

 

I've ordered 2 stones, and the 1000 grit arrived today (while 6000 should arrive in a week or two). Immediately after unpacking the stone I decided to sharpen my old cheap knives. I've got old 365+ chief knife from IKEA and 3 different brands petty knives. All of them were super dull. 

 

After spending for like 10-15 minutes with each knife on the stone I'm kind of puzzled: all the knives are way sharper now (I'm able to cut a sheet of paper with them), but still they are quite far from being razor sharp (compared to Hattori HD petty which was razor sharp OOTB).

 

I was trying to keep angle at around 15-20 degrees while sharpening, but of course, was quite far from keeping it consistent all the time. 

 

Yet, the question is: is it be possible to make a cheap knife razor sharp with only 1000 grit stone? Is it just my lack of skill or I need a finer grit stone to finish sharpening?

post #2 of 15
Thread Starter 

…with a help of few more youtube videos and a bottom of coffee cup I managed to create near razor sharp edge on ikea knife. I wonder how long will it last

post #3 of 15

Congratulations on your success. Using a really sharp knife is an epiphany, and one that you sharpened is a great feeling.

 

The fact that the sharp edge will last a relatively short time compared to a knife with harder steel, depends on a few things. The most obvious is how it's used. Also, knives' like yours have a relatively soft steel, so the sharp edge bends with use. Using a steel or strop will straighten it and you're good to go for a while until you steel it again. After a while it'll require another sharpening on the stone.

 

If you made the edge too thin, it'll start of super-sharp, but then collapse and bend in such a way that steeling may just straighten the weak edge for a very short while before the collapsed -or wire- edge falls off, leaving a jagged dull edge. Steeling alone, can cause a weak edge to come off. Either way, you have to sharpen it again using a stone.

 

I reckon BDL will have a better and more complete explanation.

post #4 of 15

Unfortunately with just 1000 grit stone, you won't get the knife razor sharp. The particle size is to big and it creates a toothy edge with more bite. Please understand me correctly. The knife will be sharp and it will cut food with ease, if properly sharpened on 1k stone, but you will struggle to shave face with it.

The higher grit you go the more refine edge you will get, and closer to the razor sharpness. But most likely you will not see a big improvement in the performance on ikea knife.

post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 

Thanks mostadonte2 and mano!

 

If I got you correctly that would be the answer for my question:

post #6 of 15
Thread Starter 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ADaRIqy0Dc

 

… just wondering if such method might work as a last step of sharpening for knives

post #7 of 15

There are plenty of stropping mediums you can use (leather belt, denim, cardboard, newspaper, manilla envelope the list goes on) and yes you can use them on kitchen knives ymmv though. Go ahead and strop your knife on some cardboard it'll refine the edge more.

post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anton Kudris View Post

Thanks mostadonte2 and mano!

 

If I got you correctly that would be the answer for my question:

 

Actually, Murray Carter used a cinder block and newspaper and had his knife shaving sharp. I lack his skills/experience so I make up for it with a bunch of stones.....

 

ps your youtube video link is kinda creepy...


Edited by harlock0083 - 8/13/13 at 11:49am
post #9 of 15

Not taking Murray's skills away but there is a difference between razor sharp and popping hairs on your arm ;)

post #10 of 15

I believe the hairs were on his face. He could also have a really really high pain tolerance or high as a kite. :)

post #11 of 15
Thread Starter 

Never heard of Murray before and was pretty much impressed by his 3 fingers sharpening test. Does it really that good? I'm kinda not brave enough to just went on and try...

post #12 of 15

The best sharpness test is cutting something. 

 

BDL

post #13 of 15

Just don't slide your fingers across the edge. :)

post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze View Post

The best sharpness test is cutting something. 

 

BDL

I've cut myself a few times. I'd exclude one's self in the something list! biggrin.gif

post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by harlock0083 View Post

 

Actually, Murray Carter used a cinder block and newspaper and had his knife shaving sharp. I lack his skills/experience so I make up for it with a bunch of stones.....

 

ps your youtube video link is kinda creepy...

 

When it comes to hyping/staging supernatural ability Murry I believe learned his schtick from some of the best, Japanese karatika

 

It will help you immensely in judging angle if you simple cut some some wedges from posterboard marked with any cheap plastic compass, use Ca to harden/waterproof them.  Lay your knife on them and you will have a good visual to go by.

 

Also, keeping your thumb on the blade makes holding 'er steady much easier

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