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Tell Me, Did I Calculate This Right? - Page 2

post #31 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post

 

Obviously, less calorie intake = loss of weight. The issue is that it leaves most people unsatisfied, frustrated and hungry, which means the instant they stop (or give up) calorie counting they gain all the weight back. I've seen many people suffer through those types of diet only to drive themselves crazy with food and end up worse than they were before they started. 

 

I think it's great that you were able to use calorie counting as an educational tool to help learn about reasonable portion size, but I believe it's unwise to advise calorie counting as an effective diet for most people. 

 

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2011/03/09/weight-watchers-finally-recognizes-calorie-counting-doesnt-work.aspx

 

http://www.primallyinspired.com/the-problem-with-counting-calories/

 

http://www.cbn.com/health/nutrition/drlen_countcalories.aspx

 

http://www.lifetime-weightloss.com/blog/2013/1/5/why-tracking-and-counting-calories-does-not-work-part-1.html

 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2201280/Calories-Dont-count-calories-itll-just-make-FATTER-Which-foods-really-make-fat.html

 

http://www.dietdoctor.com/why-calorie-counting-is-an-eating-disorder

 

http://nataliejillfitness.com/why-counting-calories-does-not-work/

 

etc...

 

A tool, that's exactly what it is.  It's not a diet.  It's a method of keeping track, it's a way to measure things.  But it's definitely not unwise to use this tool because what works for you doesn't work for others.  We are all free to use the tools that help us.  When my husband and I paint a room I use an edger - he rolls his eyes at me but I can get that job done faster than I would with a paint brush.  To him it's a stupid tool, to me it's a time saving tool.  But we can all agree, it is not an unsafe tool, right?

 

When some people do start counting calories, they may use that tool ineffectively.  They'll count out cookies and ice cream and by the end of the week they realize that they just can't eat much food, or that they're hungry, as your links suggest.  It happened to me too.  At some point along the way, by trial and error and quite a bit of reading I found out for myself that a calorie is not just a calorie.  Technically, yes, you can lose weight by limiting your calories and eating junk food.  It CAN work and it DOES work.  But nutrition and overall satisfaction will suffer and many people go off this type of diet as you suggest.  But it doesn't take long to figure out that you can have a lot of broccoli versus mashed potatoes.  If you're counting and measuring your food it doesn't take a genius to know that you can have more chicken and less rice to meet your needs.  It's a natural progression of knowledge.  If you calorie count long enough, you learn how to balance your plate without measuring anymore, without counting calories.  You know the value of food because you took the time to understand its nutritional function.  I was born dumb to this knowledge, I was a cookie and chips eater, while my mother naturally was a healthy eater.  Some people are born with the ability to regulate their nutrition and weight, some of us are not and we have to learn it.

 

Modern day food has become a science experiment.  The bulk of my knowledge on "a calorie is not just a calorie" has come from reading books like The End of Overeating, found here in a free pdf format http://www.ebookweb.org/the-end-of-overeating-pdf-download-free/-1233977002/  and studying the effect of sugar on our society, here is a really wonderful set of short episodes on the effects of sugar by revolutionary doctor Lustig, who's findings has changed my life. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h0zD1gj0pXk&list=PLB9BC165392E146AC  The End of Overeating talks about how the food industry uses sugar, salt and fat in ratios that makes our brain chemistry addicted to it.  It's highly informative in that it shows you all the lab studies they've done on mice, how chain restaurants construct their food, and how much money food product companies spend on researching the exact formulas of salty/sweet/and fat to make our brains crave more of their food.  Dr. Lustig on the other hand has taught me one very important thing - SUGAR is evil.  Ok that's a bit dramatic but it's kind of true.

 

This is how I found out WHAT I can eat, but I only came to it when I first figured out how much to eat, and that meant calorie counting.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #32 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaneohegirlinaz View Post

Many Mahalos (thanks) Miss KK, but neither DH nor I are fans of cauliflower. 

I know that you and Siduri make some pretty awesome stuff with it.

 

That's too bad, it doesn't even taste like cauliflower once you get it in dough form.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #33 of 34

Ah so.
 

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #34 of 34

Indian food can also help cutting down on meat if meat portion is an issue for you. 

 

For example, as much as I love meat and rarely feel completely satisfied by a meatless day, there's this one vegetarian dish that leaves me completely satisfied: Malai Kofta. Here's a recipe: http://www.padhuskitchen.com/2013/03/malai-kofta-recipe-how-to-make-malai.html - I have never tried to make it myself but I should. 

 

Indians are pure GENIUSES at vegetarian cooking IMO. If I were to turn vegetarian (which will probably never happen) I would spend a lot of money on Indian restaurants. Remember that Gordon Ramsay restaurant competition show? Out of who-knows-how-many restaurants who participated, the ultimate winning restaurant was a vegetarian Indian restaurant.  


Edited by French Fries - 8/16/13 at 11:55am
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