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Southern Fried Chicken

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

Hello,

 

 My wife and I were recently in Atlanta and we had the most amazing fried chicken at a place called "White Oak".  Apparently this is what southern fried chicken is suppose to taste like, not what I have been eating on the west coast. 

 

 The chicken was a breast that had been pounded flat (skinless) and then coated and prepared.. I am not sure if it was pan fried or deep fried, it did not taste "greasy" like deep fried foods often do. 

 

Anyway, I am looking for a recipe to prepare something like this.  I have found many recipes, as well as forums where people fight like crazy over how to prepare fried chicken and what it should taste like.  If anyone is familiar with the style of fried chicken served there and can suggest a recipe, it would be great. (or if you can suggest somewhere more appropriate for me to be asking this)

 

Thank you

post #2 of 14

I don't think that any southern mamas out there would agree that cooking a boneless skinless chicken breast would qualify for "southern fried chicken" biggrin.gif. I found an image from White Oak Kitchen and Cocktails in Atlanta, is this what you had?

 

 

 

I've eaten plenty of fried chicken that has a heavier batter like that. I'd guess what made your experience so good would be the place brining the breast to add moisture, then light pounding to tenderize it and allow for more even cooking. If you're after that style batter, look at buttermilk batter recipes.

post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 

That is the dish we ordered, but the batter was MUCH lighter than that picture.  As I said in my original post, I understand that many people like their fried chicken prepared differently.  I found a thread where people were actually threatening each other over if you should use egg wash or not.  So, I just was wondering if someone could suggest a recipe for something like what we had.  Since the batter was actually much much thinner than this picture, would you still suggest buttermilk? 

 

Thank you

post #4 of 14

The only images I could find for fried chicken from that place tend to be on the heavier side for batter. Here's another shot, it seems they call this dish caramel fried chicken but perhaps they have a different dish

 

 

Ultimately, you know what you liked about it. I'd still suggest you brine the chicken breast and depending on the breast you could work them out to make sure they are even. As far as batter, you will probably do best to look for recipes that feature images that are close to what you experienced and work on refining the recipe. There are lots of factors for frying food, the temperature of the batter and the oil being two key ones.

post #5 of 14

Oddly enough I just finished a dinner of fried chicken.  As I was preparing it I thought I should have taken a picture to show folks just how much hot sauce ( Dave's Temporary Insanity tonight ) I put in the egg wash.

 

I was getting hungry and impatient, put it in the oil before it was hot enough, it got a little greasy.  Tasted great, though!

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #6 of 14

Excuse me for intruding.

I'm still trying to get a handle on fried chicken.

Hard to do when I only make it twice a year.

From what I (think) I know, the buttermilk is acid and acts as a tenderizer for the chicken.

Like a yogurt marinade for chicken, right? That's all.

 

What makes the "thick batter" is dredging wet chicken in flour.

Less wet chicken will pick up less flour.

Therefore less "batter".

 

But that pic looks almost like tempura.

Maybe they used a lighter mix of pastry and rice flour.

 

I dunno. Just my 2 cents.

post #7 of 14

Sounds more like chicken fried chicken, rather than deep fried chicken.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicken_fried_chicken#Variants

post #8 of 14

Welcome to Chef Talk loguy!

I would agree with kongfeet, that does sound like chicken fried chicken.

Personally, I like my chicken katsu, a Japanese version of a chicken cutlets dredged in Panko.  I use mochiko or rice flour and then egg and then the Panko.  This gives the cutlet a light, crisp exterior, you can taste all of the components and not just flour. 

post #9 of 14

When it comes to restaurant recipes, it's anyone's guess.  I have not heard of flattened skinless chicken breasts referred to as "Southern Fried Chicken," but that's the restaurant's call.  Chicken Milanese & Chicken Karage http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2011/02/chicken-kara-age-japanese-fried-chicken-recipe.html  come to mind, but it's a far cry from "Southern fried chicken."  Try to duplicate the flavors & texture you recall. You might come up with a better dish/recipe  ;-)

post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cerise View Post

When it comes to restaurant recipes, it's anyone's guess.  I have not heard of flattened skinless chicken breasts referred to as "Southern Fried Chicken," but that's the restaurant's call.  Chicken Milanese & Chicken Karage http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2011/02/chicken-kara-age-japanese-fried-chicken-recipe.html  come to mind, but it's a far cry from "Southern fried chicken."  Try to duplicate the flavors & texture you recall. You might come up with a better dish/recipe  ;-)

 

 

I knew I had this somewhere... Karage Chicken with a WONDERFUL Soy & garlic sauce for dunkin'... where's my chopsticks... YUM!

post #11 of 14

The real thing is on the bone!

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefedb View Post

The real thing is on the bone!

I'm with you there.
post #13 of 14

I do on occasion eat boneless chicken strips or nuggets or tenders or whatever,  but my favorite is bone in, skin on thighs.  And wings.  I like wings.

 

I vaguely remember my mother cooking huge trays[1] of wings in the oven with various herbs and sour cream dribbled on them.  I'm guessing the recipe came from her mother, Anna Lutz, and they were served at Lutz's Country House outside of Dowagiac, Michigan.  I've never quite been able to duplicate the flavor I remember.

 

mjb.

 

1.  I bet they were just ordinary baking sheets, but when you are a youngster only this high they looked like they were 10 feet square.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #14 of 14
loguy, You could contact the restaurant and ask how they made the fried chicken. They might share the recipe. Also the magazine Bon Appétit has a column called R.S.V.P. , where they obtain recipes from restaurants that readers request. So they might be able to find out the secret to the fried chicken. Good luck. It sounds like a tasty meal.
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