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Oils and Mayonnaise

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 

I tried a bit of searching online here as well as other places. I've been trying to produce batches of mayonnaise to keep throughout the week and I have tried most recipes online. My question is not how to make a mayonnaise, but how to keep the oil taste out of it. I've tried many ways including dijon, salt, pepper, cayenne, etc. The oil I've found to work best, for me and my taste, is grape seed oil. But it still tastes like oil. I hand whisk and have tried adding more yolk or less oil but just can't get the overpowering oil taste out.

It is such a simple thing, but I feel like I am over-complicating it. I would love for some advice or recipes.

Thank you!

Gourmandise is an impassioned, rational and habitual preference for all objects that flatter the sense of taste.
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Gourmandise is an impassioned, rational and habitual preference for all objects that flatter the sense of taste.
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post #2 of 21

1. Have you tried sunflower oil?

2. Have you tried adding some drops of lemon juice?

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #3 of 21

a dash of lemon or vinegar will cut the oil taste

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #4 of 21

You also have to get the seasoning right. Not enough salt and it will taste like oil. Lemon helps. For a bowl of mayo, I usually add more than just a dash. I don't mind the mayo tasting like lemon, especially if it's for seafood for example. 

post #5 of 21

3. Have you tried to add some water to the yolks?

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #6 of 21
Thread Starter 
I put a lot more salt than I thought I needed and a bit more lemon juice also the shortest dash bit of vinegar. It turned out great.
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ordo View Post

1. Have you tried sunflower oil?

2. Have you tried adding some drops of lemon juice?

 


I did end up using sunflower oil and it was the best I've used. I feel very silly for posting this now. surprised.gif

Gourmandise is an impassioned, rational and habitual preference for all objects that flatter the sense of taste.
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Gourmandise is an impassioned, rational and habitual preference for all objects that flatter the sense of taste.
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post #7 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by helloitslucas View Post
... I feel very silly for posting this now. surprised.gif

NEVER feel silly asking a question! That is how one learns.

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #8 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeteMcCracken View Post

NEVER feel silly asking a question! That is how one learns.

+1. Feeling silly typically means you either just learned something or are about to learn something. So feeling silly is typically associated with the process of becoming more knowledgeable. It's a great place to be. 

post #9 of 21

you got good advice.

also next time when you do a mayo, remember the ratio.... 1 yolk can take about one cup of oil (well, actually a tad more but this is easiest to remember)

the lemonjuice and water indeed do help cut the grease, neutral oils do help the flavor like sunflower, peanut oil is also a good one....

and never excuse yourself for asking questions.

the most stupid question is the one NOT asked :)  we all want to learn.

isn't homemade mayo LOVELY compared to the shopbought crap? and it keeps over a week.....so lots of practice ;) 

have fun!

post #10 of 21

From Michael Ruhlman's Ratio, the basic mayonnaise ratio is:

  • 20 parts oil
  • 1 part liquid (water, lemon juice, any water based liquid)
  • 1 part egg

 

So, for the U.S. standard large egg yolk, which weighs 17g±2g, :

  • 340 grams oil
  • 17 grams water, lemon juice, etc.
  • 17 grams egg

 

Or a little simpler:

  • 1 3/4 US Customary cups of oil
  • 1 Tbsp plus 1/2 teaspoon water,lemon juice, etc
  • 1 egg yolk

 

According to Ruhlman, the water/lemon juice is critical and essential for adequate emulsification.

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #11 of 21

4. Once the emulsion is "taking" (it absorbs oil easily), if the density of the mayonnaise is on the thick side, you can add water to lighten it. This will also lighten the color.

It's years i stopped making mayo. Today, Lucas, you made me wanting it again.

 

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #12 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Soesje View Post

and it keeps over a week.....so lots of practice ;) 

have fun!

Hmmm how do you figure that? I'm never scared of keeping things for a long time, eating stuff past expiration dates etc... but homemade mayo I never keep longer than 3 days. 

post #13 of 21

When I made the batch of sriracha mayo for the tea cured salmon I did, I'm glad I only added like two drops of sesame oil to the mix.  It seemed like it would not be enough, but it turned out just right.

 

I wonder if there are folks who've used 100% olive oil for their first attempt, and have never tried making it again?

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #14 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by teamfat View Post

I wonder if there are folks who've used 100% olive oil for their first attempt, and have never tried making it again?

I have made mayo with 100% olive oil once. Never again. wink.gif

post #15 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post

I have made mayo with 100% olive oil once. Never again. wink.gif

 

One year of stupidity making olive oil mayo. Talk about being silly...

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #16 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by ordo View Post

One year of stupidity making olive oil mayo. Talk about being silly...

I don't believe stupidity plays a part here.

 

First, some people like it. I have members of my family who wouldn't have it any other way. 

 

Second, maybe it didn't bother you because you didn't pay attention to that particular aspect of the taste... until you noticed it and ever since it has bothered you?

post #17 of 21

Olive oil is many times used in mayo-similar preparations like aioli; lots of garlic, egg yolk, olive oil. Sometimes there's no egg in it. Some villages in southern France have an annual harvest type of feast where "faire l'aîoli" is a must; the whole village eats at long tables from the aioli prepared and served in a giant mortar, dipping in all kinds of veggies, boiled potato and hard boiled eggs.

 

Some people swear with a combination of neutral oil with some olive oil in mayo. I also prefer only sunflower oil, but recently I used rape seed oil to my entire satisfaction. I always use a lot of Dijon mustard and tarragon vinegar in mayo, no lemon, which is nothing more than a preference.

post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by helloitslucas View Post

I put a lot more salt than I thought I needed and a bit more lemon juice also the shortest dash bit of vinegar. It turned out great.
 

 


I did end up using sunflower oil and it was the best I've used. I feel very silly for posting this now. surprised.gif

 

Don't.  I just learned something :)

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #19 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post

I don't believe stupidity plays a part here.

 

@FF: my personal stupidity cause i never liked that EVOO mayo, and even so, i insisted. Don't ask me why.
Today I think: EVOO mayo? Well... de gustibus non est disputandum.
Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #20 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by ordo View Post

 

@FF: my personal stupidity cause i never liked that EVOO mayo, and even so, i insisted. Don't ask me why.
Today I think: EVOO mayo? Well... de gustibus non est disputandum.

Ah I see. I do that too sometimes too, with a "that's how it should be done" in the back of my head that takes over my tastebuds. 

post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

Don't.  I just learned something smile.gif

Me too! Thanks.
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