or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Safety Question on Cooking Pork Ribs
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Safety Question on Cooking Pork Ribs

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Wondering if one of the gurus here ..... or more than one of the gurus....could help me out with a food safety question.

 

Here's what I plan to do:

 

Cut some pork ribs into 1 or 2 inch pieces.  Marinade in a spicy asian citrus marinade for 4 to 6 hours.  Then place the meat along with the marinade into a baking dish and bake at 325 degrees for 2 to 3 hours.  Stir the meat every 30 mins or so.  Then crank up the broiler to 500 and cook for another 30 mins or so, stirring every 10 mins or so.

 

The thought process here is that the meat braises, bastes and glazes itself (well, with me mixing) in a single operation.

 

The safety question - is it safe to cook the meat in the marinade as described above, or do I run the risk of making people sick????

 

Your advice would be much appreciated!  Thank you.

post #2 of 11

Sounds like the marinade will be pretty well cooked, I wouldn't worry about it.  And pork isn't as dangerous as chicken.

 

mjb.

 

marinate: verb

marinade: noun

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by teamfat View Post

Sounds like the marinade will be pretty well cooked, I wouldn't worry about it.  And pork isn't as dangerous as chicken.

 

mjb.

 

marinate: verb

marinade: noun

Thank you for the cooking tip.  Gonna try it out soon!

 

Looks like "marinade" can be used as a noun or a verb.

 

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/marinade

post #4 of 11

Marinate the meat in a marinade.
 

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
post #5 of 11

My years at a Jesuit prep school turned me into a grammar geek, I have yet to outgrow it.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
post #6 of 11

Another grammar geek here.

 

I just checked in my copy of the Shorter Oxford English Dictionary and it does, indeed, list "marinade" as a verb.

 

I am shocked.

 

I would have bet my life that Marinate was the verb form and Marinade always a noun.

 

Still, in actual usage in kitchens and cookbooks, I agree, that Marinate is generally used as the verb and Marinade is generally used as a noun. As Pete says, "Marinate the meat in a marinade."

 

Teamfat" OT but how do you feel about the upcoming changing dictionary definition of "literally?" 

post #7 of 11

Yes, it's probably safe, but it's not good food handling.  If, for some reason, you want to braise in the same liquid you used as a marinade (completely unnecessary), you should strain the marinade, boil it separately for a few minutes at a hard boil, reduce to a simmer for a few more minutes, then re-introduce it to the food.  

 

Neither, for several reasons, is your method good braising technique.  For instance, there's simply no need to marinate meat before braising.  Braising is enough.  In fact, that's kind of the point.  Also, the meat and aromatics should be browned before liquid is introduced. 

 

On top of that, your temps and times are pretty much guaranteed to turn the ribs into mush. 

 

Finally, if a liquid is loose enough to use as a marinade, it's usually not tight enough to make a good glaze, unless it's applied very thin. 

 

Here's a better way to go about it: 

  • Make the marinade, reserve some if desired. 
  • Trim the slab(s).  Remove the membrane from the back of the ribs.  Place the ribs in the marinade. 
  • Drain the ribs, discarding the marinade.  Season with dry seasoning (if necessary) and place the trimmed slab in a large roasting pan back side up.  Cover with foil. 
  • Cook covered at 300F for 90min. 
  • Meanwhile reduce the marinade (if you'll be using as a mop and sauce) until it reaches a sauce consistency. 
  • Remove the cover, baste the ribs on both sides with the reduced marinade or with some other sauce.   
  • Return the ribs to the oven, uncovered, and front side up.  Continue basting every 15 minutes. 
  • Remove the ribs when they are tender, probably another 30 to 45min after uncovering.  Rest, portion and serve with the basting sauce. 

 

BDL

post #8 of 11

Oh Thanks, There are lots of Websters here...we can learn many things though..
 

post #9 of 11
Thread Starter 

BDL - than you very much for your detailed response.

 

I ended up doing something in between what I initially suggested, and what you suggested.  I did marinade the ribs, and then cooked them in the marinade.  Before adding the marinade to the ribs, i kept some aside to use as glaze.  I boiled and thickened this separated marinade and used it as a glade.  The ribs turned out well....dark and sticky and spicy.  Best of all, no one got sick!!

 

But your point about food handling is well taken.  I will follow your procedure next time.  Thanks again for your input.

post #10 of 11

I find it best practice to make a extra and reserve it for cooking, sauce, whatever.  Especially if you temper the meat in the marinade - better safe than stupid I always say  thumb.gif.

post #11 of 11

Good answer & advice.  

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Safety Question on Cooking Pork Ribs