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How do i measure cups into grams?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

I just came across this great Youtube channel called Laurainthekitchen but only problem is she measures a lot in cups, 1/3s, 3/4s and all that but i only know grams, kilograms, liters and mils she makes some yummy things though and i want to make her recipe of choc chip muffins with the sour cream, i don't want any other recipe as hers turns out so moist

.
Problem is with measuring out with cups is from another video i found out each brand of cups measures out differently and i'm really not sure how much all of the measurements are that they use is in grams you don't need to explain 0z though as jugs here in the UK has Oz on them anyway. Can anyone help me out?. I tried converters and read a few pages but it's too confusing for me.

post #2 of 12

The basic problem is that a cup is a measure of volume and a gram is a measure of weight (or mass).

 

For many liquids, there is a constant relationship between volume and weight, unfortunately, for many other products, such as flours or other powders or chopped, diced, minced, ground products, there is no such constant relationship.

 

To convert a cup to metric volume is fairly straight forward:

  • 1 U.S. Customary cup = 236.588mL
  • 1 U.S. Legal Cup (nutritional label) = 240.000mL
  • 1 International Cup = 250mL
  • 1 Japanese Cup = 200mL

 

The problem arises when one measures a cup of, say, flour. How do you fill the cup?

 

A cup of sifted flour is not the same as a cup of flour, sifted and they will not weigh the same.

 

Unless a recipe is very specific as to how to measure volumetrically, it will take some trial and error to arrive at a satisfactory conversion.

 

Using flour as an example, a cup of flour may weigh as little as 4 ounces (113g) to as much as 5 1/2 ounces (156g) or more. In general, a cup of flour is usually considered to be about 125g

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post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 

Many of them use cups but if you look at the other products they are different sizes which means different volumes lol the guy has a cup of 2 different sizes and 1 only measures out as 100 grams, a more deeper volume cup only measures out in 115 grams, see the problem? lol. It being 125 grams per cup is something i'm unsure about as many are also saying it's 120 grams so which is which? not too sure...

 

Can you explain it this way?

 

1 cup = ___ grams

1/4 cup = ___ grams

1/3 cup = ___ grams

1/2 cup = ___ grams

 

Whatever cup measurments there is in the US version, it would be a simple guide for me to follow i'm not too good at maths really and working it all out i get confused trying, i am ok at basic maths and rounding numbers though but soon as it starts getting stuff like that my brain just dies hehe, i tend to just wright things down to follow it so i can just get the recipe done easily.

post #4 of 12

Like Pete said above, measuring a cup of something will not translate to grams.  A cup of salt is going to be different than a cup of honey or a cup or powdered sugar.  You should probably be thinking in mls. 

 

Try this site.

 

http://www.metric-conversions.org/volume/cups-to-milliliters.htm

post #5 of 12

embai90,

 

IF 1 cup equals, say, 120g for a particular ingredient, then:

  • 1/8 cup = 15g
  • 1/4 cup = 30g
  • 1/3 cup = 40g
  • 1/2 cup = 60g

 

Math is not the problem, it is determining how much a cup of a particular ingredient weighs.

 

Try it yourself. Take whatever cup you have available. Spoon flour into the cup, strike it level, then weigh it. Do it several times to get an average.

 

Now, using the same cup, sift the flour into the cup, strike it level, then weigh it. Do it several times to get an average.

 

The third time, scoop the flour up with the cup, strike, and weigh. Do it several times to get an average.

 

You WILL have three different weights for 1 cup of flour! Those weights are accurate for your technique and they probably are different from the weights I would get doing the same process. The weights may be close but the WILL be different.

 

Repeat the same process for, say, whole wheat flour and you will get different results.

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post #6 of 12

I'm NOT an expert on the metric system, but have to throw in my 2 cents here.  Off top of my head, can say... a meter is about 3" longer than a yard, a liter is a few sips more than a quart, a kilogram is a little more than 2 lbs?? and a kilometer is a little more than 2 miles??

 

LOGICALLY, metric makes MUCH more sense... everything is a multiple of 10, 100, 1000, etc.  Think of our GOOFY measurement system... a foot is 12  inches and a mile is 5280 feet... WHY??  A lb is 16 ounces... why?

 

WAY back in the mid-late 70s there was a push (at least in SE PA & NJ) to convert to metric.  All the gas stations had prices in liters and gallons... which do NOT remotely equate.  The US is one of the few countries on EARTH that doesn't use metric system.  Shoulda just BIT the bullet, let people WHINE and phased int ALL metric... IMNSHO!!

post #7 of 12

Um, 1 Kilometer = 0.621371 miles or 1 mile = 1.609 Kilometers

 

FTR:

  • 1 meter = 1.0936 yards = 39.3701 inches
  • 1 Liter = 33.81 fluid ounces = 1.057 quarts
  • 1 Kilogram = 2.2 pounds = 35.2 ounces
     
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post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 

Haha i know what you mean thatchairlady it's so complicated so who's idea was it to measure in cups in the first place, i'm honestly getting frustrated with it lol i got a cook book too my parents got from the supermarket by Love Food but there is no recipe for choc chip muffin recipe, i have no idea how you chefs out there get by haha too much info so little time. People from the US post recipes but don't bother to think of anyone else and just post the recipe adapted to the cups they use, what use is that when we can't do their recipes?, we need them to measure it out for us then put grams in there but they don't, so annoying.

post #9 of 12

emmbai90,

 

Here's a base recipe for muffins:

                    
* Exported from MasterCook *

                                  Muffin

Recipe By     :Formatted by Pete V. McCracken, 657 Village Green St., Porterville, CA 93257 (559) 784-6192 PersonalChef@cwdi.org
Serving Size  : 0     Preparation Time :0:00
Categories    : Batter

  Amount  Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method
--------  ------------  --------------------------------
  2              parts  flour
  2              parts  liquid
  1               part  egg
  1               part  butter

Source:
  ""Ratio", Michael Ruhlman, ISBN-13: 978-1-4165-6611-3  ISBN-10: 1-4165-6611-2"
                                    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Simply weigh you egg, say it weighs, out of the shell of course, um oh, 55 grams, that is 1 part, the rest is easy:

  • 2 parts flour = 2 x 55 grams = 110 grams
  • 2 parts liquid = 2 x 55 grams = 110 grams
  • 1 egg = 55grams
  • 1 part butter = 55 grams

 

If you use cocoa powder, say 20 grams, substitute for 20 grams of flour.

 

Add whatever amount of sugar you desire and the chocolate chips. Oh wait, you want a RECIPE, not the ratios? OK, don't have one for Chocolate Chip but start with this one (I converted it from ounces to grams for you):

                    
* Exported from MasterCook *

                            Blueberry muffins

Recipe By     :Pete V. McCracken, as adapted from "Ratio-The Simple Codes Behind the Craft of Everyday Cooking" by Michael Ruhlman
Serving Size  : 10    Preparation Time :0:00
Categories    : Batter                          Bread
                Muffin                          Quick Bread
                Sweet

  Amount  Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method
--------  ------------  --------------------------------
  226.8          grams  flour
  113.4          grams  sugar
  5 1/2          grams  salt
  9.2            grams  baking powder
  244            grams  milk
  113.4          grams  eggs -- 2 large eggs
  113.4          grams  butter -- 1 stick, melted but cool
  113.4          grams  fresh blueberries

Pre-heat oven to 350°F. Prepare pan(s), if not non-stick, spray with vegetable oil or wipe with butter.

Combine flour, sugar, salt, and baking powder (if your baking powder is "pebbly", push it through a strainer).

In a quart measuring cup or bowl, combine the milk, eggs, and melted butter. Whisk or blend the mixture until eggs are uniformly distributed.

Add dry ingredients and whisk just to combine. Add blueberries and stir just to distribute

Pour the batter into prepared pan(s). Bake for about 30 minutes for muffins, or as much as 50 minutes for a loaf, until the blade of a paring knife inserted in the center comes out clean

Description:
  "Makes 10 muffins or one loaf of quickbread"
Source:
  ""Ratio" by Michael Ruhlman, page 72, as adapted by Pete V. McCracken"
Copyright:
  "Copyright ©2010 all rights reserved, by Pete V. McCracken, 657 Village Green St., Porterville, CA 93257 (559) 784-6192 PersonalChef@cwdi.org"
Yield:
  "10 muffins"
                                    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 246 Calories; 11g Fat (41.3% calories from fat); 5g Protein; 32g Carbohydrate; 1g Dietary Fiber; 76mg Cholesterol; 433mg Sodium.  Exchanges: 1 Grain(Starch); 0 Lean Meat; 0 Fruit; 0 Non-Fat Milk; 2 Fat; 1 Other Carbohydrates.

NOTES : Variations (these are guides, use you imagination):

Blueberries, check for sweetness.

Raspberries, again, check for sweetness

Blackberries, these WILL require more sugar

Cranberry-orange, add dried cranberries and replace 1/4 of milk with fresh squeezed orange juice, add zest of two oranges

Nutr. Assoc. : 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
 

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post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 

Nice one! i really wanna do choc chips though as i am going to put chocolate frosting on the top (now that i can do lol) and we have a bit bar whether spoons cooking chocolate in the cuboard to use up and my parents are the one buying so i don't want to push it lol, i'll just use what we got as when my new mixer comes tomorrow or the next day i can use stuff we have in that. I feel like i should add some sour cream or yogurt to prevent it drying up as we don't have an expensive oven, how much should i add? like 1 table spoon of yogurt or 2 table spoons of sour cream?. By 2 pars liquid do you mean milk and sour cream?.
 

post #11 of 12

2 parts liquid means whatever liquid, i.e. milk, yogurt, buttermilk, water, fruit juice, you choose.

 

You could even try substituting chocolate chips for the blueberries.
 

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post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 

Blueberries are too expensive here and my dads not started his new job yet so just using what i have, a good trick i have learned with your choc chips is mix together all your dry ingredients then put some in the chocolate chips, this prevents it from them sinking to the bottom when cooking, once you got all your wet ingredients and dry ingredients mix together mix in the chocolate chips with the remainder of the dry ingredients :D. Whetaer spoons of course has a floury kind of thing inside it but it helps to put a bit of the dry ingredients in with it anyway.

 

Here's a recipe i just found on Youtube:

 

Makes 12

Ingredients:

3TBSP Soft Margarine

200g of Caster Sugar (or any less depending on how sweet you like it)

2 Large eggs

150ml Whole Natural Yogurt

5 TBSP Milk

300g Plain Flour

1TSP Baking Soda

115g Choc Chips

 

1. Line muffin pan with 12 muffin cases.

2, Place the margarine and sugar in a mixing bowl (or mixer) and beat until light and fluffy. Beat in the egg a bit at a time with the yogurt and milk until combined.

3. Sift the flour and baking soda into the mixture then mix together until is it combined.

4. Mix the chocolate chips and divide the mixture evenly in the muffin cases with a large ice cream scoop. Keep the muffins in for 15 - 25 mins (Depending on when they are done). Stick a took pick or thin small knife inside the muffins to check if it is done, if no mixture comes out then your muffins are done. If they are not put them back in for another 5 - 10 mins and check them again.

5. Take them out and let them cool before eating.

 

I hope this works :P does it sound good?.

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