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How To Make Perfect Pizza Dough?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

I'm trying to master a good pizza dough recipe - so far I'm doing it using just flour (standard 00, sometimes I add some wholewheat to experiment with some "healthy" doughs), water, yeast (store bought), water and salt. I mix it together and then make it super flat - in the end it is like 3mm or less thick.

 

The problem is the dough isn't cripsy enough - the egdes and also the bottom layer are moist or something and it doesn't have the feel like from a real Italian pizzeria. 

 

I have only a standard electric owen that can produce heat up to 250 degrees Celsius (or something like that, it's not brand new so probably it isn't in it's best shape).

 

Any hints?

 

Thanks a lot!

post #2 of 13

Your oven is not the best for pizza (like mine). Anyway, two hints that are three:

 

0. Weight measure your ingredients to the gram.

1. Let the dough raise in the fridge for about 24-48 hours.

2. Pre-cook the dough before topping it.

3. Use a pizza stone.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 

I'm completely aware that my owen is not ideal for pizza, but I still think my current results are far from what I can achieve with it.

 

1. Will do - but could somebody give me the best measures (weights...) for a good dough?

2. Yeah, I am always in a hurry so I don't usually have time for this, but I will definitely try it!

3. Could you pleas explain a bit more? For how long, what temperature?

4. I'm not sure what that is, but hey, that's why we have Google so I'm looking into it.

post #4 of 13

You renumbered my three tips. That's OK.

 

1. Thats Pandora's box. NY pizza? Neapolitan pizza? Argentinean pizza? This is a good start: Pizza doughs.

2. Try it, I wasn't a believer until i tried it. Napolitean style. Minimun kneading.

3. I have not a single clue about times and temperatures. Just pre-cook for a while so your toppings will not hidrate the dough.

4. Pizza stone. One of many. It intends to replicate a real pizza oven with modest success. It helps to keep the oven temperature and give the pizza 'some' taste.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #5 of 13
Thread Starter 

Wow, thank's for that link - seems like NY style will be the best candidate for my. But I tried and searched the site a bit more and there was nothing about pre-baking the dough. Well, I guess I will do some experiments first:)

 

..and I have already ordered 12 inch pizza stone with handles from eBay:)

post #6 of 13

To elaborate more on the pizza stone... Sometimes it's not your dough but the medium of how you're cooking it. You already stated that your oven probably isn't the best. Most peoples aren't. Nice job picking up the stone... I'm sure you will realize how much this helps. I, like you, have a mediocre pizza oven. I make good dough and have made some very excellent pies in it but I want just a little bit more out of them. I recently read on here about "pizza steels" used in place of stones to give a more desirable results. The way the steel transfers heat and retains less of it, compared to a stone, seems like it really is an innovative idea. I hear, they even have a chapter on it in "Modernist Cuisine" Basically, it's similar to the material used on a flat top grill. I've been meaning to fabricate a pizza steel for a few months now.  I think I'll have to finally do it now that this thread reminded me. 

 

With your pizza stone, I'd preheat it as hot as you can. Crank it up and leave the stone in there for about half hour or more.  Keep using the same dough but maybe a little less water. Keep in mind the water content of the ingredients you use will really affect how soggy the final product is, too! The thicker you make the pizza, the more soggy, too! Maybe just adjust your technique and you might find your dough is just fine. 

post #7 of 13

I switched to a low rimmed lodge cast iron pizza pan instead of the stone.  The stone is good, the cast iron is better.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #8 of 13

I get good results from my oven at home using a pizza screen.  The recipe for dough I use is:

 

1000g flour (high gluten)

650g water

25g salt

6g yeast

25g olive oil (optional)

 

I divide it into 3 balls and let rise at least 2 hours at room temperature or up to 3 days in fridge.  If refrigerated, let come to room temp for an hour.  Then stretch each to make a 15" pizza (can go larger or smaller depending on desired thickness).  Bake at 475F for 12 minutes, no prebaking of crust required.  If you leave out the oil, you can go 500F for a shorter time and crispier crust.  For a very crisp crust, bake on lowest rack.  Also, I have found that using the oven in regular mode (not convection) makes for a better crust.

 

Here is a spinach and home-made bacon pie.

post #9 of 13

Dough wise, I use a bread flour. Let it rise slowly, retarded in the fridge for a day or two if possible. Bread flour gives you the gluten to stretch without breaking so you can roll it thinly, but also gives the proper chew. 

 

Where you want crisp, preheat heat your oven at it's highest temperature for 30 minutes at least. Rack in the lower 1/3 of the oven, with the stone/steel/cast iron on the rack to get hot too. This focuses the heat on the crust so you can cook it crisp while your toppings are buffered a bit. With a convection oven, this probably won't hold as true.

 

It's easiest to slide a thin crust onto the stone if you assemble the pizza on parchment paper. Far superior to corn meal for sliding though the corn meal is a nice texture too.

 

There are texture differences between stretched and rolled pizza. I don't think the difference is huge, but some do.

 

Other things to remember about pizza.

 

1, and the most important. Less is more. Light on the sauce, cheese and toppings. This is especially important with a thin crust.

 

2 Don't overload the pizza. Wait, I just said that. Well, remember it because it's important.

 

3 a THIN layer of good olive oil brushed over the stretched pizza dough can help keep the crust from getting soggy from the sauce and toppings. It's also a good receptacle for some dried oregano sprinkled on before the sauce.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #10 of 13

Each and all great tips, phatch. Have to try the cast iron pizza.

Pre-backing: When you bake a pízza in a plus 400°C oven it's a 7-8 minutes process. In a 200°-250°C oven you need much more time to bake the dough and the sauce will eventually moisten it. When i pre-bake (dehydrate) the dough a little i get better results. We talk home ovens here. But, as you know, pizza is a religion. You believe or not. My best effort this year:

 

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #11 of 13

I must've made about 8 pizza's in the last 2 months in search of that perfect pizza dough. I found the perfect dough that fills my expectations of the best pizza I feel I can get at home in my electric oven, and it ain't half bad. I'm born and raised in NYC, so I have HIGH expectations. Plus we have two amazing pizzerias within 20 min driving distance, so whatever dough i made had to be as good as those.

 

Here are the two doughs that made the top two.

from americas test kitchen:

http://www.americastestkitchen.com/recipes/detail.php?docid=26804

 

Video instruction:

http://vimeo.com/47961386

 

here was my result:

Sweet Italian Sausage and Shiitake Mushroom White Pizza

 

 

This was the last one and best one I made:

 

http://www.annies-eats.com/2010/04/29/perfect-homemade-pizza-crust-tips-and-tricks/

 

Admittedly, the dough from this recipe was extremely hard to work with, but I believe it's because I measured my flour, instead of weighing it. It was like working with lava.

 

 

Here was my result...not the best picture.

http://s22.postimg.org/qsgp9gd0h/DSCN1274.jpg

 

 

...but that last dough was SO delicious, it had flavor! and it had a artisan quality to it too. The first dough I made in the beginning of my search (not posted here) tasted very yeasty which is unappealing to me.

 

 

I heated my oven to 500 degrees F and reheated it at that temp for at least 1/2 hour.

I hope this helps.

 

It also helps not to overload the pizza the way I do... i love extra everything. tongue.gif

 

Ordo, Love that pizza. It's so perfect. Like a baby.

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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post #12 of 13

I use cast iron and a stone.  One oven rack in the middle with a clean, dry 12" cast iron skillet on it.  Another rack just below that with the pizza stone on it.  Then crank it up, my oven goes to 550 F, at least 20 - 30 minutes.  Don't make many pizzas in the summer.  Slide the pie onto the stone, usually take about 7 - 8 minutes.  The radiant heat from the hot skillet right above the pie makes a difference.   I use the same sort of thing for both homemade and Papa Murphy's take and bake pies, though the store bought ones tend to be thicker and take a bit longer.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #13 of 13

well the recipe you just gave is a classic basic bread dough recipe :) : 100% flour, 65% water, 2% salt, 2% yeast usually, you used only a fraction was that dried or fresh?

and yes use brread flour ;) (I mix mine with one third cornflour (polenta fine) for extra crunch)

and thats how the pizza started out once , in italy....

 

I make mine sourdough based: 1 cup sourdough 1 cup flour, 1 teaspoon salt, bit olive oil.

knead well, let proof approx 4 hour (till almost but not yet fully, doubled)

bake as normal 

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