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How many restaurants have you worked in?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
Talking with some friends last night they found it strange that I've worked in so many different restaurants, in 9 years I've worked for 12 or 13 different places. I've always been the type to move on to experience and learn new things. Does that look bad on a resume in the Food industry as it would in any other?
post #2 of 11
Yep
post #3 of 11

kinda yeh , <_< may give the impression that you arent so loyal....

 

Then again in the past 3 years i worked in 3 different places ( of course one restaurant shut down , and the other i left at good peace with everyone including my boss. ) So i cant really judge XD 

Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

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Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

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post #4 of 11

in my 3 yrs cooking ive been at 5. 1 solid year in my first gig, then a 3 month paid stage in another state, then back home to start working 2 jobs for a solid year. one closed down, and I worked at two different places but I didnt see myself fitting in with the current team or the way the chef ran his business. left the morning gig and are currently going to culinary school while holding a full time gig at night. It is NOT good to have jumped around so much even though I understand where you're coming from as far as being exposed to different techniques and ingredients and such. While I learned a lot going from place to place, it was merely to find the one restaurant that I felt would be beneficial to my career and experience. Another thing is the networking I've been able to do since I started. Haven't had the need to turn in a resume for any job I've gone for.

post #5 of 11
Over 25+ years I've hired hundreds upon hundreds from hourly entry-level to senior level professionals.

Typically six months is the minimum needed performing any job or position to be reflective of gained experience. Twelve months is better.
When an employee leaves within six months or less it can raise a "red flag" requiring determination as to reason. Many jobs take 3-6 months just to fully ramp.

It can indicate inability to make a commitment to the job and employer. With that said not every job is going to be a perfect fit so when there is one or two quick turnovers they can be overlooked.

There's also the level at which you are currently at within your profession or career. A 20 year experienced chef or manager who leaves a job after a few weeks tends not to be of concern as likely concerns arouse not discernable at job start.

A young person, on the other hand, newly gaining experience may be moving upwardly if shown responsibility and wage increasing quickly over 2-3 jobs over a.year.

On the other side of things someone leaving jobs every 90 days is the classic "cant hold onto a job

Be prepared to explain in detail (without excuses) as to why you've gone from job to job. Also there's huge difference in a person who worked every single shift, never called in sick and was often available to cover extra shifts to those taking their job casually.

BTW my first job ever I held for seven years rising from bus/dish to line then night/weekend chef supervisor. Next position was well paid food service management as obviously I was the longevity type employee.

Ask yourself if viewing resumes who will you consider more. The person with 1-2 jobs in 10 years or ten in ten?

There's also the food service industry to consider. Turnover is very high, average life expectancy of food businesses is short and certainly minimum wages don't instill loyalty or longevity.

Final thought it comes down to the hiring manager. If she/he sees and hears what they need then nothing else will matter.
post #6 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by mertensia View Post

Over 25+ years I've hired hundreds upon hundreds from hourly entry-level to senior level professionals.

Typically six months is the minimum needed performing any job or position to be reflective of gained experience. Twelve months is better.
When an employee leaves within six months or less it can raise a "red flag" requiring determination as to reason. Many jobs take 3-6 months just to fully ramp.

It can indicate inability to make a commitment to the job and employer. With that said not every job is going to be a perfect fit so when there is one or two quick turnovers they can be overlooked.

There's also the level at which you are currently at within your profession or career. A 20 year experienced chef or manager who leaves a job after a few weeks tends not to be of concern as likely concerns arouse not discernable at job start.

A young person, on the other hand, newly gaining experience may be moving upwardly if shown responsibility and wage increasing quickly over 2-3 jobs over a.year.

On the other side of things someone leaving jobs every 90 days is the classic "cant hold onto a job

Be prepared to explain in detail (without excuses) as to why you've gone from job to job. Also there's huge difference in a person who worked every single shift, never called in sick and was often available to cover extra shifts to those taking their job casually.

BTW my first job ever I held for seven years rising from bus/dish to line then night/weekend chef supervisor. Next position was well paid food service management as obviously I was the longevity type employee.

Ask yourself if viewing resumes who will you consider more. The person with 1-2 jobs in 10 years or ten in ten?

There's also the food service industry to consider. Turnover is very high, average life expectancy of food businesses is short and certainly minimum wages don't instill loyalty or longevity.

Final thought it comes down to the hiring manager. If she/he sees and hears what they need then nothing else will matter.

Valuable words.  Nicely put.

post #7 of 11

I mean, where do you really start in regards to your career?  I've worked in a total of 14 in about the same number of years.  2 of those were high school jobs, 4 of those were in excess of 2 years where i either rose to a sous position, or started as one. Some were 3 month stints realizing that it a specific restaurant wasn't the right place for me.  Restaurants are not like other professions in regards to time.  like mertensia said, be honest about why you were only at a place for 5 months.

post #8 of 11
I've worked in Pittsburgh, Philly, NYC, Chicagoland, Boston, and the surrounding areas and Sweden now for the last 8 years. I,ve had 9 "real" jobs but have worked at hundreds of places in the last 36 years. By real jobs I mean places I took my regular pay check from and were my main focus. However, in this business you usually build a network and get lots of calls to help out, fill in, cover a shift ect ect. I always enjoyed doing that, get to see some new people and food, build your network, drinks and waitresses after work, all good times and educational. So my answer is twofold, 9 and hundreds
post #9 of 11

In the last 4 years I've worked in 3 places....and I thought THAT was a lot, haha. 

post #10 of 11

I have had eight jobs in about 25 years, one was a lateral move and promotion within the same company. I tend to stay put.

post #11 of 11
Thread Starter 
Well mainly I've always moved forward and up with changing of jobs, always on good terms with my employers. I've always had a really strong work ethic - I've worked in several restaurants where people are bitching about not getting enough hours, where I'm pulling overtime every week. I've worked in so many different restaurant, but I've still gotten great recommendations from all of them. Current situation I moved from kitchen manager in a casual restaurant to a grill position in fine dining - my old employer couldn't argue me leaving because they were unable to match the pay. I trained my replacement. I'm 25, I've been doing it my whole life and I've finally found somewhere that meshes perfectly with my culinary beliefs and the pay to match. I was just curious if anyone else had similar experience.
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