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Stage in France

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 

Hello, I am a recent graduate in culinary arts.  I have a stage in October in France for possible hire afterwards.  They only kitchen experience I have is my 4 month internship I needed to complete for graduation. I really want to land this job, but I am so nervous.  What should I expect? Any advice??

post #2 of 4

It's great that you are doing your stage in France!  It would be a great asset for your career.

 

For me, 4 month experience is nothing. If I were the chef of your stage place and want to hire a new grad,  what I want to see is your basic skill set, work habit, willingness to learn and passion. I can teach skills but I can't change your natural character.  Just be proactive for any assignments you get and ask questions if you are not sure.

 

Do you have EU passport?  Understand basic french? I hope you do.

 

Good luck!

post #3 of 4
Speak French. Show up ready to work early. Listen to every thing said to you and respond. Take your own knives and make sure the're sharp. Work hard and smart. Good luck to you, let us know hiw it goes.
post #4 of 4

Hey, moved this thread to "After Culinary school" since it seemed more appropriate. I did the very thing you are doing so here is what I will tell you.

 

  • Everyone tells you to speak french and in most cases discourages you that it will be to tough. I did not speak French I only new basic words I learned from my culinary school "Culinary French" class. I did just fine so don't worry about this. Just be attentive and learn what you need to learn.
  • Bring a notebook and write everything down.
  • Be prepared to work harder then you ever thought. I worked 6 days a week lunch and dinner with a few hour break in between. It is exhausting. If you are not in the best physical shape get your self in shape.
  • Be honest about what you know don't try to pretend you know something you dont. Like Crosi said focus on the basics (working quickly, good knife skills, willingness to learn).
  • Be prepared to make mistakes. The first day I was in France I was so nervous I cut my finger very badly. So badly the head chef took me to his office and had to bandage my finger. I did two things after that experience. I laughed and thanked God because in the big scheme of things it really did not matter what they thought about me. Second I never went to a job site with out my own supply of bandages in my knife kit.

 

Lastly, enjoy yourself it is a once in a lifetime experience. Hope that helps and encourages you!

Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
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Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
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