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On milk in chinese cuisine... - Page 2

post #31 of 32
Thread Starter 

Thanks babytiger,  I was just curious, esp about the stir fry with milk products.  It's all just curiosity - i'm perfectly happy going to chinese restaurants and making my own stir fries the usual way without any dairy.  I had noticed also a major absence of tomatoes from the chinese diet, but i have heard of, for example, a tomato omelette sort of dish in one region, and i imagine others are around. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #32 of 32

Im not quite sure if it's a Cantonese thing or more a Chinese American thing, but tomato eggs is a popular dish. There are quite a few ways to make the dish. I personally like to make the dish now savory than sweet and sour.

 

This is what I put in my tomato eggs dish:

Eggs

Tomatoes (I don't like very ripe tomatoes for this dish. Not green ones, but still quite firm and maybe under ripe for eating raw.)

Green onion (cut into pieces that are about 2 inches long, how much depends on your taste - this is also optional as I tend to skip it when I don't have any on hand)

Ginger (a few slices - this is optional)

 

I first scramble and cook the eggs. For this dish, I like to cook the eggs quite well, with some brown spots. Remove from wok/pan and set aside. I then add the ginger and cook for about 1-2 minutes to release the aroma. Add green onion and cook for about 30 seconds. Then add tomatoes (quarter or into eighths, depending on the size). Let the tomatoes cook until it breaks down and release the juices. A small pitch of salt will help as well as a little water. Once the tomatoes has broken down, adjust your seasonings. If it is quite tart, I add a little sugar. (Add more sugar if you prefer the sweet and sour version.) Then I adjust the salt level with fish sauce. I happen to prefer fish sauce over soy sauce or salt in this. But it's up to what you prefer so season with what you like. After you adjust the seasoning, add the eggs back and cook for another minute or not. Taste, adjust seasonings if necessary. Serve with rice or noodle (if serving with noodle, add more water at the beginning so you will have more sauce).

 

Tomato beef is a variation of this dish. Instead of eggs, you can use thin stripes/slices of beef or even ground beef. Other types of protein such as pork or chicken will work as well. 

 

There are some more dishes that has tomatoes as a component (i.e. soups), but may not be the feature of the dish. There are also dishes that have a tomato based sauce, such as tomato prawns and the red sauce on ying yang fried rice.

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