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Advice on some Japanese Knives

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

Hello all!

 

First time post and first time Japanese knife buyer.  I am looking for a standard chef knife along with a standard/utility knife (to be used primarily for cleaning up chick breast and thighs along with fish).

 

For the chef knife I have my eyes set on the 9.5" Mac Mighty Chef and for the utility knife I was considering Mac 6".  There are obviously a ton of choices for Japanese knives.

 

Any comments on these choices? 

 

Thanks!

post #2 of 6

Welcome to ChefTalk!

 

This will just be as preparation to help you clarify the exact knives you are referring to, so our resident expert (hint to BDL to step in here and take over) can give you the best advice.

 

Are you referring to Mac knives in the "Professional" series?  If not, could you specify the precise knives you are looking at?

 

The web site for Mac Knives is www.macknife.com.

 

Hope that speeds things up just a bit.

 

 

Galley Swiller

post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the reply.

 

I am referencing the professional series of knives.

 

PKF-60 - PROFESSIONAL SERIES 6" UTILITY KNIFE

 

http://www.macknife.com/kitchen/products-by-series/professional-series/31-pkf-60-professional-series-6q-utility-knife.html

 

 

MBK-95 - PROFESSIONAL SERIES 9½" CHEF'S KNIFE

 

http://www.macknife.com/kitchen/products-by-series/professional-series/34-mbk-95-professional-series-9fq-chefs-knife.html

 

I'd be willing to extend my budget to a Kikuichi TKC.  My only concern is that I currently don't have the time to take on learning how to properly sharpen a knife.

post #4 of 6

Hi Davewolfs,

are you considering just yo-gyutos (western) or are you open to wa-gyutos?

Also, only considering stainless?

 

But so far, I recommend you to consider rearranging your schedule to make room for learnin how to sharpen. Another options is to buy one guided sharpening kit, such as Apex and Wicked edge, but they are kinda expensive. However, you would be able to take the most of your knives. There are some good online tutorials that, with a 3 stone set and an old knife, would help you to develop the skill to a good level n a couple of months.

 

MACs are excellent choices, but you can find some other really good options on the price range. Actually, I would recommend you to buy each piece from a different brand, so you can expand your horizon.

post #5 of 6
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dhmcardoso View Post
 

Hi Davewolfs,

are you considering just yo-gyutos (western) or are you open to wa-gyutos?

Also, only considering stainless?

 

But so far, I recommend you to consider rearranging your schedule to make room for learnin how to sharpen. Another options is to buy one guided sharpening kit, such as Apex and Wicked edge, but they are kinda expensive. However, you would be able to take the most of your knives. There are some good online tutorials that, with a 3 stone set and an old knife, would help you to develop the skill to a good level n a couple of months.

 

MACs are excellent choices, but you can find some other really good options on the price range. Actually, I would recommend you to buy each piece from a different brand, so you can expand your horizon.

 

Perhaps at a later date I would be willing to invest in both time and gear to properly sharpen knives, but for now not on the list.

 

That being said, what are the simplest  (I realize they are not perfect) solutions for some kinves?  Would the Mac's be decent with a ceramic honing rod and a pull through style sharpener?

 

Can any of the true gyutos even be sharpened with these solutions or am I better holding off (I'm fine with that too).  My preference is to a yo-gyuto.

post #6 of 6
I own the Mac Pro gyuto and for the first year or so I sharpened with a chef choice machine. I've also been told the minosharp works well. For honing I use the Mac black fine ceramic. This combination kept the knife sharp and a joy to use. I haven't used the kikuchi but it gets great reviews. Not sure you would get all it can give with the sharpening options you are looking at. If you want to learn to hand sharpen in the future more power to you, it's relaxing and rewarding. If you don't I wouldn't worry about it. If you're in the US there are options to send it away if you need the knife thinned or if you find yourself craving more in terms of sharpness

I should say this is coming from the assumption you are a home cook.
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