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Professional chef in a far from professional kitchen

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 

Hi all, I'm looking for some advice.

 

After some particularly nasty experiences at the last restaurant I worked in, I decided to make a bit of a change and have just taken up the position of in-house chef at a small company.

 

This seems pretty much like the perfect job for my personality and skills - however the kitchen is way below par. Minute surface area, a glorified toaster oven with no temp control, a semi-functioning 2-plate induction hob, tiny fridge. And I've not started on the utensils, pots, pans, serving dishes. And the knives!!! Am cooking for 25 people which is a perfectly normal amount... in a good kitchen.

 

I really want to make this work but at this stage I'm a bit worried that my food will in their eyes reflect me rather than the tools that I have to work with. Should I shut up and get on with it being that I've been given this great opportunity (own boss, pure creativity, no late nights, nice pay); say something to them (and when? I'm only on day 3), or get out quick and go somewhere else? 

 

Has anyone else had an experience like this and how did you deal with it?

 

Thanks!

post #2 of 4

I have been in this situation once before , and i ended up getting out because well to me it wasnt worth it. 

3 cooks in a small kitchen with no tools , no good knives , and everything was deep fried. Now by the info you gave out so far it seems like your job actually has some positive notes to it. 

 

So just think.... Is it worth it? Is the pay worth what i do on the job? Will this job look good on my resume? Is it challenging? Can i gain more experinece here?

 

and quote: This seems pretty much like the perfect job for my personality and skills

 

There are quite abit of factors ( aside from the ones stated ) that will influence your decision.

In my opinion your are only on day 3 , its very possible this place may just challenge you enough that you will develop a fast and convient way of putting out some dishes. Give it some time you just may learn something. 

 

I like to think... you can learn many things by doing something the wrong way , as well as learning on how to do certain tasks the right way.

Who knows maybe if i had stayed in that job i would have learned somethings that would influence my work method in the future. 

Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

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Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

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post #3 of 4

My suggestion: Get your own knives. I would say about a quarter of the places I've gotten line cook jobs at had no knives provided for their staff. They had a "bring your own" attitude. Which is fine. I certainly learned more about knives after the first place. Pretty much every other place that had knives, everybody brought their own anyway. 

 

My other suggestion: Ask for better equipment. You'd be surprised how receptive some people will be if you do just that. Ask for better pots and pans. Start small. Then start hinting at how terrible their equipment is. You might be surprised to find out they already realize that and were just waiting for some chef to come along and tell them. They could be saving up for it. They could be willing to buy a little at a time to improve. It sounds to me like you really fit well in at this job. To let something as little as poor equipment get you out would be a shame. I don't know how many places I've worked at that had broken or sub-par equipment and we just kept rolling with the punches. 

post #4 of 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vic Cardenas View Post
 

My suggestion: Get your own knives. I would say about a quarter of the places I've gotten line cook jobs at had no knives provided for their staff. They had a "bring your own" attitude. Which is fine. I certainly learned more about knives after the first place. Pretty much every other place that had knives, everybody brought their own anyway. 

 

My other suggestion: Ask for better equipment. You'd be surprised how receptive some people will be if you do just that. Ask for better pots and pans. Start small. Then start hinting at how terrible their equipment is. You might be surprised to find out they already realize that and were just waiting for some chef to come along and tell them. They could be saving up for it. They could be willing to buy a little at a time to improve. It sounds to me like you really fit well in at this job. To let something as little as poor equipment get you out would be a shame. I don't know how many places I've worked at that had broken or sub-par equipment and we just kept rolling with the punches. 

 

agreed XD 

Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

Reply

Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

Reply
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