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Certificate vs Degree

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

I am currently working as a Sous Chef for a management specialist company and the business has decided to end the contract. They want to hire me on as the Sous Chef (which is what I am doing now and have done for the last 6 months) but they are requiring me to get a certificate or degree in Culinary. What is the difference and who does certificate programs? I can only find schools that have degree programs.

 

Thanks

post #2 of 9

Are you, by chance, close to Houston, TX?

post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 
No, not at all
post #4 of 9

Well in my opinion i certificate/degree signifies you did a course. But a degree covers various subjects while a certificate may only grasp one. 

 

I have 5 culinary certificates

1) Basic Culinary training and knife skill course

2)Wine Pairing course

3)Customer Service course

4)Higeine and food manipulation course

5)Culinary tendencies course 

 

Basically 5 separate certificates , 5 different courses all grasping one subject

 

While lets say A culinary arts degree would grasp mostly all these subjects in a longer period of time. 

 

I plan on gaining a degree but right now my courses and work experience is enough. 

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Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

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post #5 of 9

A certificate is a piece of paper with the school's name printed on it. Different schools give different certificates for different things. No real way to compare one to another. Worth next to nothing on the hierarchy of higher learning.

 

A degree is accredited and recognized as either a AA or a BA (or higher, but I doubt you're doing that). Regardless of where you go, the degree lets others know that you achieved a specific level of learning more distinct than any certificate would. While all this sounds nice, in this field it also means pretty next to nothing as we all know.

 

Most of the time if people are going to shell out for education, I recommend the AA because at least it will be recognized as an accredited degree. A certificate IMO is worthless. In your case though I would probably go for the certificate because it would be the cheapest fastest way to get you to the job you want.

 

There are Le Cordon Bleu schools all over America and I am fairly sure (but not 100%) that they all offer some form of certificate program, though undoubtedly at a heavy cost. Check any local/community colleges in your area and see if they offer any certificate programs? You would be surprised.

post #6 of 9

I would say check out the community college for your cert or degree. I would also check into the degree offered if that is what you chose. Most of the schools that offer a degree is not worth the paper it is printed on. The degree is an AOS which is a degree from a trade school so if your thinking is to go on and get a BA or BS the AOS will not help you get your BA. Also Le Cordon Bleu is a 15 month program and will run you 50,000. or more. 

post #7 of 9

Actually certificates can be pretty useful when obtained after a degree.

I had a BSN-RN (bachelor of science in nursing) with certifications in 1. high risk maternal-fetal nursing 2. electronic fetal monitoring 3. neo-natal resuscitation 4. case management 5. geriatric care in the home setting

I worked with a few LVN's (certificate "degree") that had been in a department for so long that their salary almost matched mine.

 

Any education is better than none and if this company is fine with you having a certificate instead of a degree than you should be too.

A bit of advice....get the certificate and if possible get the degree bit by bit (your new employer may even pay for it).

 

mimi

post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post
 

Any education is better than none and if this company is fine with you having a certificate instead of a degree than you should be too.

A bit of advice....get the certificate and if possible get the degree bit by bit (your new employer may even pay for it).

 

mimi

 

Now thats true , attempt to get both if possible. 

The reason i make more then regular cooks with a degree is because i had gotten certificates bit by bit. 

Plus its always fun learning and meeting new people when doing these courses regardless ( you get to do some networking ) 

Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

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Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

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post #9 of 9

A degree is nothing more than a collaboration of general education courses, ie., math, algebra, history, biology, english, etc.  A culinary certificate means you have studied the art of food preparation, the science behind it, sanitation, hospitality, knife skills (which improve with experience), culinary math, formulas and recipes, etc.  The whole nine yards.  I have been cooking for over 40 years, yet just decided to make it a profession.

 

You can obtain a degree in anything and adding a culinary certificate only means you studied various subjects that have absolutely NOTHING to do with the culinary arts, except a degree in business management.

 

I think you should obtain your certificate at an approved college and you don't have to shell out 50,000+ to obtain it.  I am a veteran and the VA provided me with sustenance to get mine.  I don't understand why someone would command a higher salary just for having a degree in say, "basket weaving" than someone who obtained a certificate in culinary arts and is experienced and talented.

 

I will be receiving my certificate in restaurant management in the Spring 2014, and one day when my mind is rested enough to absorb it, I'll resume the only class coming between me and my AA degree is ALGEBRA, ugh!  Until that day, however, my skills and certificate will definitely take me where I need to be.  Who knows?

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