or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › HIMALAYAN SALT PLATE
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

HIMALAYAN SALT PLATE

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

We were given a large, thick himalayan salt plate as a gift.  It is fabulous to look at, but my first attempt at cooking with it produced a very salty result.  Does anyone have any tips? What I did was, place it in the oven to get hot. I par boiled some broccoli, slices of squash and some baby potatoes.  I think the salt plate was hot enough, as the food sizzled when placed on top.  I realise that things will be salty, but it was almost inedible. 

post #2 of 10

Wow what a nice gift?  I've personally never seen one or eaten from one or cooked with one.  I thought they were only used as plates.  I didn't know you could cook with it so I'm interested to learn how to.  

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #3 of 10

I've never heard of those either. But my guess is, anything watery will disolve the salt, which is probably why slices of squash for example may create water and end up making your dish overseasoned?
 

If I had one and was attempting to cook with it I'd probably start by roasting some meat on it, for example a whole chicken?

post #4 of 10
Thread Starter 

French Fries - that is what I have decided...but anything I put on there will be "wet"?  We don't eat meat, but have heard that fish works well.  Lots of experimenting to do! 

post #5 of 10

I would think of this more in the style of a dry fondue. Very thinly sliced vegetables and meats. Very hot salt plate/stone at the table. 

 

Oil it lightly with an oil and let the diners quickly sear off their selections on the hot stone. Should take  10 seconds on a side or so. 

 

Something like this (from Dzur by Stephen Brust):

 

Quote:
 

I had made a good choice by accident, showing up as I did in the early afternoon. I enjoyed
Valabar's when it was full of people, but being almost alone fit my mood. I sipped my klava, and found
that I'd closed my eyes for a moment, savoring what was, and what soon would be. I smiled.


Presently Mihi, a pleasant, chubby Easterner with great, gray bushy eyebrows, approached again.
This time holding a large, wooden platter that I knew well. He gave me a sort of conspiratorial
smile, as if he knew what I was thinking. I imagine he did.

 

 The platter contained a block of granite, smooth, about a foot round, and heated in a bread oven. Mihi set the platter on the table, and took a small stoneware pitcher from his apron. He gave it a quick, practiced shake, then removed the cork from the pitcher.
The bottle had oil—a mixture of grape-seed, olive, and peanut oil to be precise. The aroma it gave
off as it spread over the heated granite was mild, slightly musky. I sat back in my chair. It had been so
long. The last time I was at Valabar's, I was--


I was still married, but let's not go there.


I wasn't yet on the Organization's hit-list, but let's not go there either.
I still had all ten fingers, but let's &c.


Years. Leave it at that.


Telnan gave the platter a curious glance, as if wondering what was to come. Around it were leafs of
lettuce—red, green, and yellow. Between the lettuce and the granite were thin strips of raw beef, smoked
longfish, raw longfish, poultry, lobster, and a small pair of tongs for each of us. All of these except the
tongs had been marinated. Hey, they marinate the tongs too, for all I know. I'd give a lot to know what's
in the marinade, but it certainly contains lemon.


Also on the platter were three dipping sauces: hot mustard, sweet lemon sauce, and
garlic-horseradish-crushed-mustard-seed sauce. I don't generally use the sweet lemon sauce; something
about that combination of flavors bothers me. The other two I alternate
between.


You take beef, or the fish, or whatever, and move it to the middle of the granite, where it cooks in
about ten seconds on a side—the waiter will do that for you, if you wish. Then you take it with the tongs,
dip it in the sauce of your choice, and go to work. With the beef, I wrap it in a piece of lettuce. I started
to show Telnan how to do it, but Mihi was faster and better. Telnan paid close attention to Mihi's
instructions.


"You know," said the Dzur, "this is really good."


"You know," I said, "I believe you're right."

 

Each chapter starts with a course of this particular meal, and it sounds majestic.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by kimmit View Post
 

French Fries - that is what I have decided...but anything I put on there will be "wet"?  We don't eat meat, but have heard that fish works well.  Lots of experimenting to do! 

 

I'm sure fish would work well, especially skin side down, or a whole fish. Chicken skin and fish skin are waterproof no? In any case, I believe you should get a crispy salty skin, but the salt won't penetrate the flesh, so it shouldn't end up overseasoned. I'm thinking of the example of the whole chicken cooked in a salt crust (you can do the same thing with a whole fish):

 

post #7 of 10

Using the salt block to cook food should be done with a lot of try & true thinking in advance.

 

Salt block is a poor conductor of heat, and it cannot hold a lot of BTUs. Depending on the recipe, it will make your food too salty to be edible.

 

I sometimes do the opposite. I refrigerate the salt block.

 

dcarch

 

 

post #8 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by phatch View Post

I would think of this more in the style of a dry fondue. Very thinly sliced vegetables and meats. Very hot salt plate/stone at the table. 

Oil it lightly with an oil and let the diners quickly sear off their selections on the hot stone. Should take  10 seconds on a side or so. 

Something like this (from Dzur by Stephen Brust):


Each chapter starts with a course of this particular meal, and it sounds majestic.
Oh my...that does sound majestic,,,just loved that & am going to have to read more by Mr Brust. Thanks for this!
post #9 of 10

You may also want to look at Mark Bitterman's book, 'Salt Block Cooking ' which has alot of techniques in it.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thanks petalsandcoco, will check it out.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › HIMALAYAN SALT PLATE