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Egg freshness

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

I have an egg cooker that was given to me as a gift.

 

It's a neat little egg shaped cooker made by Cuisinart. For those not familiar with it; it cooks eggs to a specific doneness by steaming them, based on the amount of water you add to the cooker. They supply a cup with markings for 1-7 soft, 1-7 hard, etc.

 

My question is this; does the freshness of an egg determine where the yolk solidifies in the egg when stood on end and syeamed to hard cooked.

 

Since I only have access to supermarket eggs here in Queens, I cannot get ahold of a truely fresh egg to test my theory so I figured the home cooks, chefs, students and others from a larger cooking community might have an answer for me.

 

Red.

When it's smoking, it's smoking!
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When it's smoking, it's smoking!
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post #2 of 8

Not sure if this helps, but I've seen it said that if you place an egg in a glass of water, a fresh egg will sink to the bottom. If it is past it's prime it will float. I doubt that ends up determining where the yolk rests but figured I'd share.

post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 

eastshores,

That's an interesting factoid I'll be sure to remember.

 

Thanks,

Red.

When it's smoking, it's smoking!
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When it's smoking, it's smoking!
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post #4 of 8

The fresher the egg, the more centered the yolk tends to be. The white strings attached to the yolk, the chalzae, help hold the yolk in place.

 

As the egg ages, the airspace increases, the albumen thins out and the chalzae may dissolve away. These factors contribute to the yolk following gravity towards what ever end is down.

 

The older the egg, the better it will peel when hard boiled.

 

So if centering is paramount, freshness helps. If peeling cleanly is most important, older eggs are better. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 

Awesome phatch, that's the answer I was looking for.

 

Red.

When it's smoking, it's smoking!
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When it's smoking, it's smoking!
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post #6 of 8

not sure I understand what the actual question is - because whether the yolk is centered or not does not affect when a yolk begins to 'solidify' - that is strictly a temperature thing.

 

this link addresses cooking in water, not steam, but other that the fact that steam takes longer to reach the same temperature, the issue is identical

http://www.seriouseats.com/2009/10/the-food-lab-science-of-how-to-cook-perfect-boiled-eggs.html

 

I'm in an area where I can get eggs still warm from the hens.  such freshness makes for taller yolks, a more "condensed" fried egg "foot print" due to the thicker whites.

 

bought some Eggland over priced eggs in the supermarket - total waste - totally not "better" / "fresher" than the off the shelf store brand.

 

people rave about fresh eggs & yolk color & whatnot.  the color of the yolk depends on the chickens' diet.  that's it, that's all there is.  "freshness" does not affect the yolk color.

 

as an egg "ages" carbon dioxide escapes the white, the white become less cloudy and becomes thinner.

 

before getting too excited about floating and sinking eggs, do an experiment:
buy some eggs.
mark the date with pencil.
once a week put the egg(s) in water and see if they sink or float.
you'll find that you would likely never ever even _think_ about keeping eggs long enough for them to float.

post #7 of 8

I get fresh eggs on Saturdays at Socrates Sculpture Park in Queens.  There is a farmers market there every Saturday.  Very fresh eggs and really affordable, they cost the same as grocery store eggs.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #8 of 8

There are farmers markets all over new york city. The one in union square is the most famous but I know of at least three in Queens. 

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