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Partner for a gyuto

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
First off I'd like to thank everyone for the information on threads that helped me choose my first good knife.

I purchased a Gesshin Ginga 270 Wa gyuto and am expecting its arrival in the next day or two..

I only had a few cheep knives prior to this purchase that I have been practicing sharpening with.

The common jobs in my kitchen that I figure I can't do with that particular gyuto would be separating a chicken (never half the chicken or cut bones just cut through joints) and cutting heavy skinned pumpkin or pineapple. Occasionally I ballottine chicken or French trim a lamb shank but that would occur 5 times a year at maximum.

At the moment I will use the cheap knives I have. What knife would people recommend to fill these roles? Seen as it is a bit of a knife to abuse I don't want to spend big dollars.
- a French or German chef knife?
- wa petty knife?
- the old knifes I have?
- honeskui?
- boning knife?

Cheers for the advice.
post #2 of 12
  1. Parer.
  2. Honesuki.
  3. Bread knife.
Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #3 of 12

A honesuki is great for breaking down birds, ballotines, Frenching and squaring a rack of ribs. People who don't know it's a boning knife reach for mine to use as a petty because it's only 150mm and looks user friendly. One of the best knife bargains out there is the Tojiro DP honesuki at $79 delivered.

post #4 of 12
I think for the jobs your describing you need two knives . A boning knife or a petty or a honesuki would do the meat work well. The honesuki more for birds I believe.
Then a "heavy duty backup"
This knife is ideally Softer steel to avoid chipping . a more obtuse angle...20 degrees again to ovoid chipping and preferably inexpensive . Your old cooks knife will do .
Or a victrinox cooks knife is very affordable
post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the advice all.

I figured it might be the domain of two knifes.

Would a bread knife be capable of slicing the pumpkin and pineapple or is it more just for bread?
post #6 of 12

A good bread knife is a wonderful tool.  I use mine for pineapple, melon, pumpkin and yes bread.  I have a Mac superior, but with the price increase I would buy the Tojiro 270mm one if I needed another. 

post #7 of 12

The MAC Superior is an excellent bread knife, but it never occurred to me to use it on thick skinned fruit. For that, I use a brute gyuto and when carving a pumpkin, the honyaki.

 

Brute gyuto:

 

http://www.japaneseknifeimports.com/kitchen-knives/zakuri/zakuri-240mm-blue-1-kurouchi-gyuto.html

post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 
Is a brute gyuto pretty much a German/French knife with thicker profile and more abuse tolerable steel?
post #9 of 12
Far from me to explain other's post, but a heavier blade would have a thicker spine, greater weight, and perhaps a more convex grinding. It says more about geometry than about profile, I would say.
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by nickm523 View Post

Thanks for the advice all.

I figured it might be the domain of two knifes.

Would a bread knife be capable of slicing the pumpkin and pineapple or is it more just for bread?

A good bread knife is good for way more than just bread.  But don't take my word for it...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dvNs4zB6zXg

post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by nickm523 View Post

Is a brute gyuto pretty much a German/French knife with thicker profile and more abuse tolerable steel?

You could probably just use an older knife for tasks that make you nervous about using your J-knife.

 

Reference to German/French could be ambiguous, depending on whether people interpret that to mean the profile and geometry, or the type of steel used.  Sabatiers, Wusthofs, etc. are generally made of softer and tougher steel, so they make good back ups.

post #12 of 12

I know there is a preference for heavier knives when dealing with heavy ingredients. Sometime the length of the knife is just as important. As long as you are not twisting the knife, which can damage a high carbon blade, you can usually maneuver very well through something like a pumpkin or pineapple with a Gyuto. In addition to the Honesuki which I think will one day be a very popular knife in Western kitchens, I like the Garasuki which is a larger and heavier version of the Honesuki, and can used like a Deba knife. I also love bread knives and I think they undervalued and more versatile than their titular name. For pumpkins and the like a good peeler can also pave the way for a cherished blade.

Bruce, the owner of Yoshihiro Cutlery, hopes to share the superior quality of Yoshihiro knife production, and its rich history and tradition with...

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Bruce, the owner of Yoshihiro Cutlery, hopes to share the superior quality of Yoshihiro knife production, and its rich history and tradition with...

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