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5 log reduction

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

when checking in your order how do you determine that a product has been 5 log reduced according to the USDA. I understand that most of your fruit and nectar products should be 5 log reduced, but how do you determine that during inspection?

post #2 of 5

There is no way unless you know what it was to begin with.  As long as it is in an aseptic container I don't see the big deal.  Why do you want to know?  It's generally regarded as safe.

post #3 of 5
Thread Starter 

thanks Kuan. I never heard of 5 log reduction until some of our fruit juices were comng in bad. We had our account mgr. from the purveyor we were dealing with come out and look at the shipment. After verifying that the juices were coming in bad he mentioned that all similar products are 5 log reduced to reduce bacteria levels in these products. I shook my head and said ok but I really didn't no what he meant. I asked my exec. chef and he heard of it but didn't know how to tell by looking at the product. So here I am on-line asking the same question, but not many peope really know, maybe it a minor concern that doesn't come up much in the industry. I was more curious then anything because in 15 years ive never heard that term used. thanks jimmyl

post #4 of 5

A 5 log reduction means lowering the number of microorganisms by 100,000, simply meaning that if a surface has 100,000 measurable pathogenic microbes on it, a 5 log reduction would reduce the number of microorganisms to just one.

post #5 of 5
Thread Starter 

Thanks RSTEVE I really had no clue what that meant, however it came up in conversation with a purveyor so I decided to ask about it. My executive chef heard about it but didn't really understand it. This is probably something I wont be dealing with any time soon in this industry, but if I do at least ill have an idea what they are talking about.

thanks for your reply


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