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Question About French Dishes

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 

Hi,

 

I'm a novice and would like to try a few of the French cooking staples. So what would be a concise list I should try? 

 

Beef Bourgignon

Onion Soup

 

What else? thanks

post #2 of 22

At the top of my head:

- Pot-au-feu.

- Coq au vin. 

- Quiche Lorraine.

- Cassoulet.

- Blanquette de Veau.

- Navarin d'agneau.

- Boudin Noir. 

- Lapin a la moutarde.

- Magret de canard au poivre vert. 

- Fricassee de volaille.

post #3 of 22

A few more ideas:

 

Pissaladiere

La Soupe au Pistou

Salade Nicoise

Souffle 

Bouillabaisse

post #4 of 22

Chicken fricassee?

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #5 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by teamfat View Post
 

Chicken fricassee?

 

Basically a kind of chicken braise that is kept white. Sautee the chicken pieces without coloration (keep them white), add aromatics and don't brown them, singer (add flour and toast the flour), add the braising liquid (white stock, or white wine and white stock), finish with cream, typically served with petits onions glaces a blanc (not colored), poached mushrooms, sometimes turnips, anything WHITE. You can serve with fresh pasta or boiled potatoes. 

 

Here's an English language recipe: http://memoriediangelina.blogspot.com/2009/09/fricassee-de-poulet-l.html

 

2009+09+06_0069.JPG

post #6 of 22

Actually I do know what it is.  My favorite is the version in James Peterson's "Sauces" book.  That is probably the one recipe I follow most closely.  OUr friend whose wife passed away Saturday morning is coming for dinner wednesday, maybe I'll make that for him - it is a real comfort food type of dish.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #7 of 22

Confit de canard et lentilles braisées, pommes frites

Ratatouille (I like to serve it with pork chops and rice)

Côtes de porc à la normande (I like baked small new potatoes with this)

Poulet au vinaigre, perhaps with estouffade de carottes

Choucroute garnie à l'alsacienne

Truites farcies (stuffed with spinach-and-cream stuffing, baked with white wine and then a reduction sauce is made with Dijon mustard, lemon juice and cream) - serve with baguette or bread

 

 

post #8 of 22

Search youtube for Raymond Blanc and pretty much do everything he says :)

post #9 of 22

I second sam! raymond blanc is a very good teacher, making his recipes easy to follow.

post #10 of 22

maybe this is when you search google , youtube , or a great book. 

 

Suggestion search for a copy of Larousse Gastronomique english copies have been available since 1961

This book is a culinary encylopedia with a vareity of french recipes , techniques , etc... 

I dont know the price, but my chef had a copy of it when she was younger , apperently its amazing. 

Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

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Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

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post #11 of 22

If you're looking for the most popular and frequently made dishes in France and you're looking for a very no-nonsense basis, this is a book that I found very helpful and I still use it frequently;

 

 

 

 

Also, these books belong to a series of cookbooks and, they are very cheap!

Another highly recommended one is The food of Italy from the same series. Simply two must-have for anyone looking to get started in Italian or French cooking.

post #12 of 22

Gratin dauphinois! :)

post #13 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post
 

Gratin dauphinois! :)

 

Oui!

The day i can master all these recipes i will say to myself: Now you're a trully home cook.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #14 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post
 

Gratin dauphinois! :)

 

How can anyone forget to mention that one? Deceptively easy to make if you ask me.

post #15 of 22

I know its Swiss origined, but what about Fondue au fromage?

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #16 of 22
Pommes dauphines. 
 

 

Pommes souflees

 

 

post #17 of 22

Pommes fondant?

 

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #18 of 22

Nobody is hungry for French dessert?  How about crème caramel, Paris Brest, or tarte tatin?

post #19 of 22
Over the weekend I will make a gateau a la creme, will post a pic for you smile.gif
post #20 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post
 

Nobody is hungry for French dessert?  How about crème caramel, Paris Brest, or tarte tatin?

 

How about a far breton aux pruneaux? Here's one I made. Very easy to make, delicious, and really unlike anything else I know.

 

post #21 of 22

The texture looks perfect.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #22 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by petalsandcoco View Post
 

The texture looks perfect.

 

Thanks Petals! That dessert is all about the texture to me. It's the smoothest texture with that consistency.... a little harder than a flan... more like a flan patissier (Flan with flour added). 

 

I rarely strain stuff, but I always strain the batter before pouring it in the mold for this dessert, to get rid of air bubbles and get the perfect texture. BTW if anyone ever wants to give it a try, don't be surprised by how thin the batter is (almost the consistency of milk, really). It's surprising putting a big dish of what seems to be just milk in the oven, and have it end up being solid in the end.

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