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Bread storage

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
How and where do you store your bread? We get fresh from the bakery but it stays tucked in an paper bag inside of a plastic shopping bag. There must be a better and more attractive way to store it.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #2 of 25

In a paper bag - no plastic bag - in a bread box on the counter. 

post #3 of 25

If it comes from the store, i do it like you, paper and plastic.  Then  in  the breadbox.  Otherwise it goes dry too soon. 

When i make my own bread, if it's artisan bread, i keep it only in a paper bag (i found a store that sells paper supplies to small stores and bought a huge pile of brown paper bread bags).  The no knead artisan bread keeps very well in there, even for a week. 

If i make soft american style bread, or honey wheat bread or somesuch, i keep it in a plastic twist top bag.  Otherwise it doesn;t stay soft. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #4 of 25

Problem is that bread is not part of the culture here in the U.S. At least daily bread other than Wonder Bread crap. Good daily bread shouldn't cost $4 a loaf/baguette/country style. If it didn't then you would buy bread every couple of days and the thought of having to "store it" wouldn't be an issue. You would make garlic soup or croutons or bread crumbs/french toast/ etc. etc with leftovers.   

 

Every day bread here in the US is not what it is in Europe. It's gourmand or artisan bread worthy of good capitalism. What the market will bear as opposed to a daily staple. 

 

Buy bread in wax paper and keep it in that for a a day and a half and then in plastic - to be "refreshed" in the oven before serving. Sometimes you can spritz some water into a halved baguette and placed in the oven - it crusts the outside and softens the inside. 

post #5 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by jake t buds View Post
 
 the thought of having to "store it" wouldn't be an issue. 

 

You're so right. In France, you wouldn't even consider buying a baguette for your dinner at 3pm. You'd buy it at 7pm, eat half of it still warm while walking back home, and the other half at dinner at 7:30pm. The next morning, any left over bread goes in the bread toaster for breakfast tartines.

post #6 of 25

An interesting detail is that in Rome, at least, you don't buy the loaf of bread -or rarely do.  You buy by the kilo - half a kilo, a kilo, etc.  So the bread stores have a stack of loaves, sometimes a foot and a half across and over a hand's width high, and on top is a third or quarter or whatever is left from the last person. 

I used to go by foot to the neighborhood stores and buy milk, bread, fruit, meat, vegetables, daily.  I didn't work outside and had two kids. It was possible.  Now i do my food shopping weekly and am usually coming home from work when the stores are already closed. 

But good Roman bread (which hardly exists at all any more) is denser than french, and lasts many days, even a week, in paper.  Nowadays though,  unless you get it from out of rome, in the countryside, and pay more for it, it's dried out in a day, crappy, too light, too fake.  Result of short rising, quick methods, and probably additives to the flour. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #7 of 25

The Germans buy heaps of bread - especially stuff of the schwarzbrot variety tends to last quite a deal longer than white bread. Though it isn't stored so often - either consumed for "abendbrot" in the evening or breakfast. So little time for leftovers. I store my white bread in a bread box but I'm still very wary as it can go bad pretty fast.

post #8 of 25
Thread Starter 

Interesting, bread culture is different everywhere.  Being in NY I have access to really good bread from greek or italian bakeries.  I buy a loaf of greek-style bread for $2.30 at the bakery down the street.  I don't buy it every day because we can't eat that much bread.  I buy it only when we need it, if we're having a dish with a sauce that calls for bread, or I buy ciabatta for hubby to make his lunch sandwiches with.  I don't eat much bread myself.  I don't mind eating yesterday's bread, I love it.  I don't buy wonder bread, thought I do have a difficult time buying whole wheat sandwich bread without additives, but my toddler likes pb&j sandwiches so it's a must.

 

The bread culture in france sounds nice, it's not like that in Greece.  Bread is bought in the morning from the bakery while it lasts.  If you don't buy it early in the day it may be all gone by the time you want it.  Bread is baked only in the mornings.  This is not a big issue though because there's no such thing as "dinner" in the greek culture.  The lunch time meal is the main meal, the one that involves the bread eating, the evening meal is usually very light, more like a snack and doesn't usually involve bread.

 

I don't agree with jake, in certain communities the bread culture is vibrant.  Maybe not in middle america, but certainly in NY there are plenty of folks that I know that walk down to the bakery in the morning and get their daily bread.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #9 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

 

I don't agree with jake, in certain communities the bread culture is vibrant.  Maybe not in middle america, but certainly in NY there are plenty of folks that I know that walk down to the bakery in the morning and get their daily bread.

Sure. NY is very different and cosmopolitan as opposed to middle america. Maybe in Astoria (where I assume you live since it is a well known Greek community) you can get good daily bread cheap, but finding a decent baguette for $2 is impossible. And I'm not talking about the tasteless bread you find in local supermarkets. In Mediterranean countries that I have been to, a medium sized baguette is/was 1 euro. I just recently bought a chiabata at the local farmers market for $4, and it wasn't that big. Whole Foods or Citarella's has decent bread but it's very pricy for what you get. I used to live in Sunnyside and there was a local "french" bakery. They made great pastries (custard filled almond croissant was to die for) but couldn't make decent bread to save their lives. Maybe I'm just being hypercritical.

 

I think the point I'm making is that daily bread that is comparable to Spanish, French or Italian, in my experience in NY, is considered "artisan" and carries a bigger price tag. Anything else just tastes like paper, imo. But I do remember going to a place after a nights of bar hopping (eons ago) in the east village that made bread over night, and if you walked in the side door at 3 am and gave the hispanic dudes three bucks they'd give you fresh made bread, still warm from the oven. Does wonders for soaking up alcohol. It didn't taste as good the next day as it did after a number of martinis though...

post #10 of 25

Dehidrating was and is a common way to preserve bread in many cultures. I eat dried home made bread in Calabria, soaked in water or milk. Very tasty and nutritious. I remember also Pane Carasau, from Sardinia, very thin and dry slices of bread that shepherds used to keep in clothes for about 6 months while in the mountains.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #11 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by ordo View Post
 

Dehidrating was and is a common way to preserve bread in many cultures. I eat dried home made bread in Calabria, soaked in water or milk. Very tasty and nutritious. I remember also Pane Carasau, from Sardinia, very thin and dry slices of bread that shepherds used to keep in clothes for about 6 months while in the mountains.

 

Reminds me of worm castles... ;) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hardtack

 

post #12 of 25
Thread Starter 
We eat a lot of dehydrated bread in Krete. It's call paximadi. Good for soups and stews. Not so good for a sandwich though.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #13 of 25
post #14 of 25

I use a pedestrian metal bread box. We have a dozen excellent bakers in a radius of only 2 km who all sell artisanal bread, always sold in paper bags. The principle is that you choose your bread from at least five or more types of freshly baked bread, let it cut and pack. I like my bread uncut, mostly any kind of multigrain bread that will last until the very last slice without drying out.

 

Today, we just bought our first panettone of this season, since a few years available at some supermarkets. We have a very similar raisin bread which sells all year round but it's not the same. Only two years ago I tried a panettone for the first time and got hooked for ever! I developed an instant addiction for the ones with the sugar confited citrus bits in it. Cut a large slice and bite in it from ear to ear, yummmmm! It lives a very, very short life in the bread box.

post #15 of 25
Thread Starter 

I need something I can hang, a bread box takes up too much room on my counter top.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #16 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post
 

 

Reminds me of worm castles... ;) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hardtack

 

 

We have something similar here: Galleta marinera (Mariner cracker):

 

       Google image

Hard as a rock. Not for my milky teeth!

KK. those bread containers can be hang on the wall as i remember.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #17 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post
 

I need something I can hang, a bread box takes up too much room on my counter top.

 

Makes me think of a few years ago, when the BBC made one of their imo best cooking programs with the very lovely Rachel Khoo, at that time living in a tiny Parisian apartment with an even tinier kitchen.

I found a few pictures on the internet from then. I loved her kitchen and the chaotic appearance. Proves that the size of a kitchen is not necessarily in relation with what's coming out of it!

 

 

post #18 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post
 

I need something I can hang, a bread box takes up too much room on my counter top.

 

You're right on that, I hate that part about it. Maybe I should look for something I can hang myself.

post #19 of 25

@Chris: Hot chick!

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #20 of 25

I know a lot of people use cloth bags for bread, not sure how they are though.  I keep thinking cloth would hold mold spores, even through washing - but maybe in a paper bag in a cloth bag, hung on the wall...?

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
post #21 of 25

We used to keep bread in cloth (no paper or anything bewteen the bread and the cloth) when I was a kid. Never had a problem... FWIW. But the bread would become hard faster than it does in a paper bag, it seems - although it wasn't the same bread to begin with so hard to tell for sure. 

post #22 of 25

A number of years ago, I nearly bought an unusually simple Turkish kelim (loosely hand-woven carpet) of around 1,5 x 1,5 meter square that was used for storing warm bread in while people were baking. I presume it was used when making lots of flatbread in one baking session. They put the hot bread in and folded half of the kelim over it.

Storing still warm bread in "loose" textiles makes a lot of sense imo, it allows the heath and vapor to escape, still leaving a nice crust on the bread, but, I also think maybe the bread dries out much faster.

I like the idea of putting a bread -packed in paper- in cloth. Why not have some sort of bag made from a cheap kelim?

 

@ordo; absolutely my friend!

post #23 of 25
Thread Starter 

I could possibly have one sewn for me.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #24 of 25

My mother used a cloth bag, hung it on the back of the kitchen door. worked well when buying bread every two days. Anything that absorbs the moisture in the bread will dry it out though. You could try freezing as well, and de-frost in a brown paper bag at 350 for like 20 minutes. You have to keep an eye on it or the paper will burn. Don't know why you use the paper bag, but it seems to work better than without. 

 

Try this :

 

http://www.amazon.com/Bread-Baguette-Fresh-Friendly-Storage/dp/B0029TGL4E/ref=pd_sim_k_3

 

We have one similar to this and use it on occasion. It's plastic lined cloth.

post #25 of 25

If i could get waxed paper bags i'd use those for the bread. In the summer, even the no knead bread goes dry.  (not in winter though - and our house gets to 95 degrees inside, so it's quite hot).   Or they sell bread sometimes in supermarkets here in bags made of cellophane (which is still a paper type product, not plastic) that has tiny holes in it.

I think there was another reason i stopped using cloth (i was wrapping the bread in a dishtowel for a while) - i think it wasn;t because it dried, but it became soggy, if i remember. it was some time ago though. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
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