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Making a prep list

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

I've been exploring different techniques to making a prep list for my bakery. Yup, boring topic, but an essential element in a smooth running operation.

 

We used to just make it at the end of every day, but things kept getting missed and then there would be last minute additions. Lately, we've been doing inventory once/week and then making a prep list for 5 days. The goal is that we could start seeing trends and then adjust our batch sizes to streamline things. 

 

How do you folks manage your prep lists? Do you use a par system? Does one person do the list, or does everybody contribute?

post #2 of 11

I have had a lot of experience with this and from my point of view the first thing to create is a way of tracking sales.

This becomes your "par" if you will.

Keep track of the items that move better then the others.

Count customers through the door.

Keep track of "rushes" and what time of the day they USUALLY happen.

Starting out from this stage will be by trial and error at first.

After the second or third week, you should have a pretty good idea of what sells and what does not.

 

Knowing this information you can now create prep list.

These lists can be daily or weekly or anything in between, but they must contain specifics,

if you are going to use this information to keep tight inventory controls.

 

Here's an example:

 

For Monday

 

2 gallon Italian bread

1 gallon raisin cinnamon bread

1/2 recipe eclair dough

1 quart pastry cream

ect......

 

This way the prep staff knows what they have to make.

 

For banquets....I always made lists in gallons of quantity. If I had a group of 100 ppl and the serving soup size was 6 ounces, I simply multiplied 6 times 100 which equals 600 and I divide that by 128 ( the number of ounces in a gallon) now I know that I need approx.21 1/2 gallons of soup plus a little extra, just in case....

post #3 of 11
21 1/2 gal of soup? Typo maybe
post #4 of 11

typo indeed.......4 2/3 gallons...thanks

post #5 of 11
Np good formula tho. I work in a banquet kitchen and were trying to implement number. Only problems is the beo might say 600 and 300 might show or visa versa. But i do need more indept know of kitchen calculations. I downloaded a app for formulas but. I dont think the conversion is correct i.e. 40 gallons of soup aint the same as 40 gallons of stuffing.
post #6 of 11

I am at a loss as to what exactly you are looking for, is it portion size or ...?

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #7 of 11
Ya what mean is how do you know the # of ounces of a product someone will eat. At a buffet. I.e a person might eat 6 oz of soup that dont mean they will eat 6 oz of stuffing. Or does it?
post #8 of 11

Tracking consumption and guest satisfaction is the best way to determine that, but be sure to quantify whether ounces in each case, are volume or weight.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #9 of 11
Ya sorry to intrude on some1 else topic might need make my own
post #10 of 11

"Np good formula tho. I work in a banquet kitchen and were trying to implement number. Only problems is the beo might say 600 and 300 might show or visa versa. But i do need more indept know of kitchen calculations. I downloaded a app for formulas but. I dont think the conversion is correct i.e. 40 gallons of soup aint the same as 40 gallons of stuffing."

 

 

 

I too was a banquet Chef for many years in a dinner theatre. On Thursday afternoon matinees I'd prep for 750 pre-paid pre-ordered lunches and had to have amounts for things like soup, sauces, and proteins very closely prepared. So the list is very important.

One of the more important things is the guarantee. That number must be to you no later then 48 before the function.

If the BEO guarantees 700 and you prep for 700 and only 350 people show, that's the sales office problem not yours.

If the BEO reads 700 and 25 more show up but sales never told you....again, that's their problem, not yours.

 

Your portion questions are valid. Aren't there any banquet menus where you're at that describe the food?

The portion numbers for what people eat for plated and buffet dining is something experience teaches.

There are guidelines out there that you can access to help.

 

Here's a sample.  

For plated banquets soup is usually a 6 ounce pour.

Depending on sales department the proteins can vary from 4 -10 ounces depending on the meat.  

So it sounds like the problem is in the office not your kitchen.

post #11 of 11
Well we get paid for the number of guest regardless and leftovers saves the edr money. But ya there is some number issues in sales and event coordinators. But the event coordinators tell the people who make the beo's a number but it is a coin flip who will show these parties (where numbers are usually off the most) are for elite guest and is free them to go.

I dunno ive complain about it but someone higher than me will be looking into it.
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