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What Happens When You Abolish Tipping - Page 2

post #31 of 37

"Maybe some of the servers lurking on CT will weigh in and we can have a proper debate."

 

Exactly. Been an interesting thread, but it seems to so far be mostly from the Kooks' or customers' perspective.

post #32 of 37

Hnnnnnnggggg... I hate this topic.

WARNING: COMMENCING RANT

It has so many dimensions that it can't possibly be just black and white. I'm going to narrow it down to my country, because I've heard that tipping in a restaurant is not expected and sometimes unwanted in other countries. And then it has to be narrowed down again because of the state that I live in (Washington). Here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_U.S._minimum_wages#State Look! Feast your eyes, glut your soul on what a tipped employee makes hourly! $9.19/hr! Oregon and California are close, but... And I'm sure you might think that, "oh well, all other wages must be based off of that". NO! They're not! Go through a school program to be a "chef", come get a job here, and the server (who was hired as a host 6 months ago with no experience) is making more than you. A server can easily make $20/hr on top of that (where I am). After kitchen tip out (which I don't think is legally enforceable, and at the very least, unregulated) you're looking at an unskilled laborer making twice as much as a skilled laborer. Not to say that all servers are "unskilled", and of course they have tons of experience serving because they've been doing it for years because they make more than the chef!!!

Apologies to servers browsing; my anger isn't directed at you. It's just that every time minimum wages goes up, I'm guaranteed to NOT get a raise. So the majority of my fellow employees get raises once a year whether they deserve it or not and well, it's been a couple years for me.

RANT COMPLETE

 

A server making $2.63/hr is a good reason to tip well.

 

I got a question, though: I recall in the 80's tipping was 10%. Then in the 90's it was 15%. Now I see auto-grats that add 18% and it's kind of expected that if you're in the industry you tip 20%. Is that a local thing?

 

OMG I's so wound up right now....   it took me 10 minutes to delete swears and make it sound nice....   hhhnnnngggggg

I hate this topic.

post #33 of 37

In new york , a documentary stated that most tip 18% - 20%. 

Which in my opinion is just crazy , especially if i wasnt given good food , with bad service. 

Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

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Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

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post #34 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by left4bread View Post

 

I got a question, though: I recall in the 80's tipping was 10%. Then in the 90's it was 15%. Now I see auto-grats that add 18% and it's kind of expected that if you're in the industry you tip 20%. Is that a local thing?

 

I waited tables in the 70's & 80's, in Florida, Colorado, and California. 15-20% was norm.

 

In Florida and Colorado, I was paid half of the minimum wage and still made way more money than most of the kitchen.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #35 of 37

Sad but true wait staff can and do make more $ than the rest of the house.

I am gonna go there....

Servers (ones that can hustle) don't just shuttle  plates from the kitchen to a table.

He/she makes their money off the % of the total ticket.

You can make a big chunk o' change if you are in an upmarket house and do your job which is SALES.

Cocktails, appetizers, wine, dessert...would you like to see our cigar menu sir?

Cigar room attendants tip whoever moves a diner into the humidor (of course that was back in the day have no clue how this works anymore but assume nothing much has changed)

Heck those that are "career" and serve at the white linen places can pull down 75 k? (some is in cash and you will never hear them talking money) a year after tip out.

I know a server in his late 60's.

Been doing this since he was in his teens (started as a dishwasher natch).

He never works the floor when the local sports teams are playing at their home fields.

He has developed longtime relationships with some companies that own suites and can work 2-3 (per game) if he brings some help in (ooh! Pick me Sam! Pick me! ;-)

So what did we learn boys and girls?

That some servers are not servers at all.

They are sales people that just happen to make their coin selling in a restaurant environment.

IMO.

 

mimi

post #36 of 37

Now this is not personal, but I have a problem with "sales".

 

I've opened more than a few places, two of them are/were my own.  An incredible amount of energy, time, and money goes toward getting the customer in the door. Constantly.  Once the customer is in the door, it's a 99% given that s/he will spend the money, but it is not the server's job to get the customer in the door.

 

Nor do I feel that tips are commission.  With a commission the compensation is agreed upon before the tasks are done.

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #37 of 37

Thank you FP!

I agree 100% ... it takes alot of time, money and sweat equity to get a decent house up and running.

Once all the bugs are ironed out and you (the owner) have developed a loyal guest base it is up to EVERYONE to pull together to insure that those regulars continue to come (as well as talk the place up, bring guests and book catering ....)

I stand behind the word sales tho...yes it is up to you to get those butts in the seats.

Most 2 tops will only order an entree and maybe one drink from the bar...if the server is savvy and a good salesperson he/she will get that extra item from the kitchen to that table (be it pre dinner drinks with an appetizer or a dessert) which will profit both you and them.

My BIL sells high end cars.

Once a deal is done and contracts are signed he is paid a commission by his employer.

The game of golf (or sports tickets) from the happy new car owner is a gratuity.

See the difference?

As much as it annoys me I understand the inital drinks and appetizer push when we are seated (we don't often drink more than a glass of wine and if I order an appetizer most likely that is my entree) BUT if the service is great, we tip as if we had ordered and enjoyed both.

 

mimi

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