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LINE COOKS!!!???? - Page 2

post #31 of 36

I've only once had to take over as the new 'big boss'-----

 

I was under a lot of pressure to get things going efficiently----most of the crew welcomed me and my style of organizing---

 

"Most" is the key word, The first week I had to get rid of one guy, fortunately he was transferred to another job in the same company.

 

I also had trouble with another worker--Every time I turned my back he would defy my orders---we were short handed so I tolerated him for a month or so.

 

He quit on his own after many reprimands.

 

All in all it went well----I have my style---I only ask for a person to be the best they can be---and I provide training and tools so they can grow--

 

If your changes make sense to the workers,you will be fine.

 

 

Just remember,some people are bull headed and will fight you--those can cause trouble and might need to be fired or transferred out of your command.

post #32 of 36

Be friendly with the new staff, but not friends. Explain the new procedures. Explain the consequences of not following the new procedures. Have a short grace period, in your head, for transgressions. After the grace period, stick to your guns. Make absolutely sure that you are the optimum role model for the new procedures.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #33 of 36

I know exactly what you mean. I open/run kitchens in airports and we are currently in our opening phase, 4 restaurants open 4 to go. I typically have to hire 12 to 14 line cooks at a time. Add to that the fact that because we are in an airport about 70% of the cook workforce is crossed off my list. They simply can't pass the badging process. I also can't hire anyone with a record. The pickings are super slim. I try to over hire and weed out what I can. I have had some truly terrible experiences dealing with these kids.

 

To add to that, airports are changing. Gone are the days of the Burger King and the McDonalds, we are now into Celebrity Chef driven restaurants. Two of my restaurants have Nationally recognized Celebrity Chefs at the helm (Rick Bayless and Patricia Yeo) and they don't seem to understand my plight of having to hire less than stellar talent and try to stick to their sometimes incredibly high standards. 

post #34 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by alaminute View Post

And this is why our practice is so vicious at times -to weed out the weak. I move with a sense of urgency and accuracy and I demand that my trainees do the same. If they're not keeping up, or their cuts aren't gonna fly I let them know immediately- when I say fine brunoise I mean 1/16", and not cross chopped. How can expect someone to maintain a station if they can't even keep up with prep? So I'm pretty much straightforward and blunt bordering on rude for stag and new hires until they prove they care about what they're doing. I want people to walk out on me because I'd rather find my out if that person is my '1 in 100' in their first week than to carry them and have them leave for a hotel or corporate in four months.

 

I'd love to work in the kitchen with you.

post #35 of 36

I remember when I first started cooking as an apprentice, The chef told me to make a devinshire cream for the dessert we were plating so I thought about it and I did not know what it was.  He thought I should have already known what it is.  I think sometimes it comes to common sense thinking.

 Training, and respect of each others knowledge, the line cook's respect for the Chef's ideas and styles and utilize their skills to accommodate not overaccomidate.  

 

I said respectfully "I do not know what it is, but after today i will hope to be able to show someone else how to make it as well"

Another Day, Another Battle.
Don't Ride A Boat Without A Paddle.
If The Water Is Not Too Deep,
Take A Little Swim But Don't Fall Asleep!
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Another Day, Another Battle.
Don't Ride A Boat Without A Paddle.
If The Water Is Not Too Deep,
Take A Little Swim But Don't Fall Asleep!
Reply
post #36 of 36

Having worked as a line cook, sous chef, chef, restaurant manager and restaurant consultant I feel your pain.  I have had better luck training green peas than I have with the shiny new graduate that gets in the weeds just doing prep!  At least with the former dishwasher that has a serious desire, I didn't have to untrain 95% of the culinary school out of them.  It really boils down to the individuals personality and their understanding of what it takes to be successful in this business (eyes open, mouth shut)  I have been able to weed out a lot of the fluff through the interview process, so I ended up with better results...2 out of 100.  Just keep trying to find the great ones, develop the mediocre ones and ignore the ones that you have the BAD feeling about to save yourself some frustration.  You said it, the Culinary schools graduate 100's per year, no need to take the first one to walk through the door

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