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Help with Steaks!

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I cannot figure out how to get that thick not necessarily char, but thick dark coating over the entire steak. That you see at fine dinning restaraunts. I think it has to do with prep or high temp cooking but i can not figure it out. I've tried pan basting and quick brioling at the end but nothing seems to work please help me.
post #2 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by jake ryan View Post

I cannot figure out how to get that thick not necessarily char, but thick dark coating over the entire steak. That you see at fine dinning restaraunts. I think it has to do with prep or high temp cooking but i can not figure it out. I've tried pan basting and quick brioling at the end but nothing seems to work please help me.

 

 

It's mostly about equipment. If you don't have a hot enough grill, you'll have a hard time getting a good crust before you overcook the steak. In the past, I've also brushed steaks and chicken with a homemade basil oil before charbroiling, but it still came down to the charbroiler.

 

At Ruth's Criss Steakhouse, they have a special broiler that gets up to 800-900 degrees.

Brandon O'Dell

 

Friend That Cooks Home Chef Service

www.friendthatcooks.com

O'Dell Restaurant Consulting

www.bodellconsulting.com

 

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Brandon O'Dell

 

Friend That Cooks Home Chef Service

www.friendthatcooks.com

O'Dell Restaurant Consulting

www.bodellconsulting.com

 

Reply
post #3 of 15

I use a cast iron pan, heated on the stove until it is smoking hot.  2 or 3 minutes on each side and in the oven to finish.  I get a great crust with this method.

post #4 of 15

I agree with a great pan and a solid heat source, I keep mine in a 350 oven and pull it out when I am ready to start, I also bring my meat up to room temp then pat it dry, the right oil helps too, look at smoke indexes for the right temp, mine is just a mix of clarified butter and oil, also press that sucker onto the pan and make it stick, if it doesn't want to be flipped yet, let it stay there till its easy to flip over

post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 
Awesome! Thank you guys im gonna try it right now.
post #6 of 15

It actually helps to turn the steak frequently.  This allows the surface to dry which is necessary for good browning.

post #7 of 15

Agreed John, the oil type is important.  I use a blend of Peanut and Olive myself, finishing my steaks with a little clarified butter.  Also great advice on letting the steak tell you when to flip it.  If its holding on, its not ready.  Sorry Dave, I disagree about frequently turning the steak.

post #8 of 15

french steel pan. canola oil. sear both sides and into a 400F oven. We take the racks inside the oven out so we can put the pan on the oven floor for instant heat. 

 

also I've worked in places where we used a sugar/sat/pepper seasoning and the sugar helps caramelize and give color to the steak.

post #9 of 15
It doesn't matter what kind of oil or pan. There I said it. You heat your fat (clarified, peanut, duck fat) till it starts smoking and then lay a WELL seasoned piece of meat ( if it's your steak than literally coat it in salt and peppy) in the fat AWAY from yourself so as not to splash yourself. The crust is a combination of the seasoning and a 'hard sear'. If your pan catches fire than your oil is too hot
post #10 of 15
http://www.goodeatsfanpage.com/collectedinfo/oilsmokepoints.htm

It does matter what typt of fat/oil you use( please refer to the above link ). It also does matter what kind of pan you use as different materials can stand different temps without damage and retain their heat with less loss than others in relationship to thickness of the pan. If your fat/oil is smoking than it is almost at its flash point and is starting to break down.

I do steaks this way, if I'm using a pan and not a grill or flat top. I put my thick bottom pan on the flame to heat, now a days always cast iron. I salt my steak on all sides and let it set for 5 mins. This lets the salt absorb and push water out. Dry the steak thourghly, crack some fresh pepper on it (all sides ) and put it in the hot pan. Cook until it releases and has crusted, turn and repeat, turn onto a fresh part of the pan. Bring to half a temp below desired temp and rest. Serve.

That my 2 kroner worth.
post #11 of 15
So are you saying that I couldn't drop an equally hard sear using either Teflon or cast iron or avacado oil or duck fat? The question was "how do I get that thick black crust - not char". Sure it's easier to use cast iron and peanut oil or duck fat tastes better and pairs better with beef but now you're getting into details on how to enhance like also throwing thyme and garlic in your pan after your first flip(you should only have to flip twice) right before throwing it ein the oven. Then pull when it's at the right temp, monte beurre and arrosse (add butter and baste). You talk of flare ups while pan cooking? Flare ups occur from grilling when you have to much fat or oil drips into the fire causing that 'undesired char' and smoke. Use less oil to lubricate your grill and protein. I guarantee I could give you a perfect sear in an egg pan, transfer to a sheet tray or whatever and finish in an oven.
post #12 of 15
You probly can get a nice crust in a teflon pan, but even by DuPont's recomendations ( best for low to med high heat cooking but good up to 500f max before damage occures)you will heat the pan hot enough to damage it to get to a high enough temp while cast iron's melting point is around 2100f. I didnt mention oil in the way I cook it because I dont use any. I did however say crusted, not char, thus meeting the requierment of that question. Im didnt mention the subject of enhancing the flavor with herbs, or different oils but only with salt and pepper. Agreed that butter basting will add a flavor. Disagree that pulling a steak at its final temp will not be overcooked, even if plated and served the carryover will take it over the temp ordered by the time it reaches the customer. I didnt say anything about flair ups whike pan cooking, I said flash point, as in when a material reaches a temp when it starts to combust. However you are correct is saying that flair ups occure when grilling and fat drips into the flames or coals causing that undesired char and smoke. Thats two different things. Side note, why would I need to lube up a grill while I was cooking on it? Ill wait until its clean and cool and oil it for storage. Also, I dont need any oil on my protein to grille it. Finally I have no doubt you can get a good crust( thats what you really ment right?not char.) In an egg pan. I know I can cause I use a well seasoned cast iron pan to cook eggs in.

Another 2 kronar
post #13 of 15

I agree

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #14 of 15
I feel like we're going in circles. I'm not disagreeing with anything your saying, great advice even. All I'm saying is the question is "how do I get a crust.." To which essentially the answer is still a smoking hot pan and a well seasoned steak. Obviously meats need time to rest, I'm happy your a talented enough cook to fry eggs in any pan too and yes, when grilling I keep a nine pan with oil, and a rolled up towel tied with twine in addition to a grill brush so I can 'lube' or wipe down my grill after brushing to get the cleanest marks.
post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brandon ODell View Post


At Ruth's Criss Steakhouse, they have a special broiler that gets up to 800-900 degrees.

Oh yes. The Monteque. That's one of their "secrets" to an amazing steak.
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